Categories
Squamosa Clam
(Tridacna squamosa) Moderate Peaceful 12" Photosynthesis Substrate 75 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Calcium, Strontium, Trace elements, Magnesium Blue, Green, Yellow, Brown Indo-Pacific Tridacnidae Tridacna Clams The Squamosa Clam is also commonly referred to as the Scaled Clam within the marine aquarium hobby. Its species name squamosa is the Latin word for scale, which explains the numerous rows of large scales over its entire shell that are often used as shelter by other organisms, such as small crabs, other clams, and other invertebrates. The shell is symmetrical, and the matching growth pattern in its shell allows it to close together very tightly when necessary. The Squamosa Clam is often found living amongst Acropora coral, anchored by its byssal filaments, generally in shallow areas of the reef where the sunlight is at its most intense. It has a wide byssal opening and long tentacles surrounding its in-current siphon, and can grow up to 12 inches or larger in the home aquarium. The Squamosa Clam is very hardy species and is much less demanding of high intensity light than most other tridacna clams. Even so, bright light supplied by power compact fluorescents or halide lamps will help it grow and keep its intense colors. The type of lamp required will depend on the depth of the tank and the position of the clam, with metal halides being necessary for placement 20" or more from the surface, while power compacts should perform well for placement 20" or less. A daylight fluorescent tube (10,000k or 20,000k) is also recommended to provide the intensity needed for this tridacna clam species. Squamosa Clams are a little bit more forgiving with their placement in the aquarium in regards to water flow than most other tridacna clam species, giving them a little more flexibility in their aquarium placement. The Squamosa Clam requires calcium levels of 400-480 mg/L, and a carbon hardness of 7 to 12 degrees, with proper levels of strontium and iodine are also needed. Squamosa Clams rely heavily on the photosynthesis of the zooxanthellae cells growing in its mantle for its primary source of sustenance. For this reason bright intense lighting is required for this species to survive and thrive in an aquarium environment. However, all clams also require micro foods designed for filter feeders, especially when small, offering such as phytoplankton and other micro-foods or marine snow provide an excellent source of additional nutrition.
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Maxima Clam
(Tridacna maxima) Moderate Peaceful 12" Photosynthesis Substrate 55 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Calcium, Iodine, Strontium, Trace elements Blue, Purple, Gold, Green, Black, Yellow Indo-Pacific Tridacnidae Tridacna Clams Maxima Clams come in a wide variety of colors and patterns and can provide a very vibrant punch of color to any reef aquarium. The Maxima Clam is also commonly referred to within the aquarium trade as the Great Clam or Rugosa Clam. In general, Maxima Clams have larger areas of solid color than the other Tridacna clams, with the two halves of the shell being elongated with a lack of symmetry. Maxima Clams will require the best water quality with intense lighting and a medium water flow. In the wild Maxima Clams are found in shallow water where intense sunlight is plentiful; therefore, in the aquarium they should be placed where they can receive direct intense lighting. Like other members of its genus, such as T. crocea and T. maxima, Maxima clams have ways of attaching themselves to the coral reef. The may also burrow partially into the substrate, but not as deeply as T. crocea. It may also attach itself by its byssal filaments, which it can do in a day or two, so its first placement in the aquarium should be considered a permanent home. The Maxima Clam is probably the most widely recognized species of the giant clams, with its beautiful mantle and rich variety of vivid colorations. Its shell may reach a width of up to 12 inches. Maxima Clams are also known to live together in great congregations in the wild in shallow areas of the reef where the sunlight is very strong. It is recommended that metal halide lighting be use in the reef aquarium to provide this species with enough lighting intensity to thrive. The Maxima Clam should also be place where it will receive a steady moderate water flow as well. In the home aquarium, the Maxima Clam needs the correct lighting and water parameters to both live and to thrive. Bright lighting, medium water flow and excellent water quality are all necessary for the Maxima Clam to survive. It also requires calcium levels of at least 280 mg/L, preferably 400-480 mg/L, as well as adequate strontium,iodine and other trace elements.
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Derasa Clam
(Tridacna derasa) Moderate Peaceful 24" Herbivore Substrate 75 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Calcium, Trace elements Yellow, Tan, Brown, Blue, Green Indo-Pacific, Great Barrier Reef Tridacnidae Tridacna Clams The Derasa Clam is also commonly referred to in the aquarium trade as the Southern Giant Clam or Smooth Giant Clam. The latter of these names refers to the relative lack of ribbing and scales on the shell, which sets this species apart from many other Tridacna Clams. The smoothness of its thick shell, and the 6-7 vertical folds helps to differentiate its species from T. gigas, its larger relative which is not as smooth and has 4-5 folds; however, in an aquarium environment scutes may develop. Deresa Clams mantles are a mixture of orange, yellow, blue, and black and white colors, and are usually a wavy striped or spotted pattern, usually with vivid blues and greens. Derasa Clams have a narrow byssal opening and the incurrent siphon has tentacles. This species is one of the largest of the "giant" clams, and grows rapidly, reaching a maximum size of approximately 20 inches. Under the proper conditions, smaller Derasa Clams can double or triple their size in less than a year. Because of their strong growth and relative ease of care with the correct conditions, most Derasa Clams in the aquarium trade are usually aqua cultured. The Derasa Clam is the most widely available and hardy of the Tridacna clams. It does require bright intense lighting supplied by either intense power compact fluorescent or metal halide lamps to live, grow, and keep its bright colors. The type of lamp will depend on the depth of the tank and the position of the clam, with metal halide being required for deeper aquariums. A daylight fluorescent tube such as a 10,000K or 20,000K is also highly recommended. Since the Derasa Clam generates much of its food through photosynthesis, proper lighting for this species is crucial so that it survive and to promote healthy growth. This species of clam also grows to a rather large 20" in size and grows quickly under the right conditions, so placement within the aquarium should be well thought out. Along with the correct lighting, the Derasa Clam will also require medium water flow, so that it may filter feed on small phytoplankton and other micro-foods within the currents. The Deresa Clam requires calcium levels of 400-480 mg/L, and an alkalinity of 7 to 12 degrees, along with proper levels of strontium and iodine. Deresa Clams rely heavily on the photosynthesis of the zooxanthellae cells growing in its mantle for its primary source of sustenance. For this reason bright intense lighting is required for this species to survive and thrive in an aquarium environment. However, all clams also require micro foods designed for filter feeders, especially when small, offering such as phytoplankton and other micro-foods or marine snow provide an excellent source of additional nutrition.
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Crocea Clam
(Tridacna crocea) Moderate Peaceful 6" Herbivore Substrate 30 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Calcium, Trace elements Blue, Brown, Green, Yellow Indo-Pacific, Great Barrier Reef Tridacnidae Tridacna Clams The Crocea Clam, which is also commonly referred to as the Boring Clam or Crocus Clam within the marine aquarium hobby, is a mixture of many bright colors. Super colored clams are typically a vibrant metallic blue, green, or blue/green coloration with spectacular patterns on the mantle. The coloration is not also this vibrant, and the more standard looking Crocea clams are purple with shades of browns and yellows. The Crocea Clam penetrates through limestone substrates by releasing an acid to break down the carbonate in the stone, then it uses the ridges of its thick shell to dig into the rock by opening and closing quickly through the use of its bysal muscles. Being the smallest of the "giant" clams, the Crocea Clam also uses its burrowing behavior to help protect itself from predators such as starfish or butterflyfish. Being the smallest of the giant clams, this species only reaches a maximum size of about 6 inches in the aquarium. In nature Crocea Clams are often found living in large congregations that can spread some distance. In order to provide proper living conditions for the Crocea Clam in the home aquarium, bright lighting is essential to promoting growth and intense coloration; as well as, overall good health. Being a filter feeder, the Crocea Clam requires that there are both medium currents from which to feed as well as phytoplankton and other micro-organisms suspended in the currents. Crocea Clams also require calcium levels of at least 280mg/L to 480mg/L to provide for proper mantle growth and overall good health. Proper levels of strontium and iodine are also very important for this and most other marine invertebrate species. Crocea Clams rely mostly on photosynthesis of the algae growing on its mantle. It should also be fed supplemental feedings of yeast-based foods or foods designed for filter feeders.
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