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Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp
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(Stenopus scutellatus) Easy Peaceful 2" Carnivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Red, White, Yellow Caribbean Stenopodidae Shrimp The Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp or also commonly referred to as the Caribbean Boxing Shrimp, has a yellow body and legs, while the chelae and abdomen have red and sometimes white and red bands. This species is a member of the Stenopodidae or "Boxing Shrimp" because of the large pinchers on their third set of legs. They often hold these pinchers erect, giving the appearance of a boxer ready to fight when they feel threatened or are trying to intimidate a rival. Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp are not only attractive in appearance, but are also provide many useful services. Within a community fish aquarium, Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp will remove parasites and dead skin from many fish species, while in the reef aquarium environment they are very efficient at hunting down and eating Bristol worms. Be sure to keep this species singularly and to use caution when keeping them with other less boisterous shrimp species. The Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp needs adequate room in which to move about the aquarium without its long antennae touching neighboring corals or anemones. It is also recommended to provide a good amount of live rock for the Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp to graze for foodstuffs and provide it with caves and crevices when threatened. The Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp must be kept singly, or as a true-mated pair, as it is intolerant of others of the same species. Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp are known to harass other smaller shrimp of different species; such as, peppermint or camel shrimps. It is very hardy species, but must be acclimated slowly to avoid any salinity and/or pH shock and is intolerant of high nitrates or copper levels. It is important to maintain proper iodine levels in the water to allow for proper molting. Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp make interesting and beneficial additions to either reef or peaceful community aquariums. In the wild, the Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp feeds on parasites, dead tissue removed from fish, and other tiny organisms. In the aquarium environment, it will accept most meaty flake and frozen foods, plankton, and other meaty items. Banded Coral Shrimp are also effective bristle worm hunters in the reef aquarium, helping to keep the population of these pests under control.
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Sexy Anemone Shrimp
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(Thor amboinensis) Easy Peaceful 2" Carnivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Brown, Grey, White Indo-Pacific Hippolytidae Shrimp The Sexy Anemone Shrimp is a truly unique and fascinating shrimp to view, and one that exhibits an unusual trait of swaying its abdomen back and forth, hence the name Sexy shrimp. This species is usually found among the tentacles of an anemone, but in the reef aquarium it will quickly find a nice coral to perch on. This is a relatively small peaceful species that does better in the more tranquil environment of a smaller reef aquarium or nano aquarium, away from larger more boisterous fish and invertebrate species. Sexy shrimp do best in small groups of 3 to 6 individuals in a smaller reef aquarium. Sexy Anemone shrimp will grow quite rapidly, molting about every 3-4 weeks. Although very hardy, the small size of these shrimp means they should be acclimated slowly to avoid any salinity and/or pH shock. While a suitable anemone is the preferred home of the Sexy Anemone Shrimp, they will also take up residence on some corals as well. As with most marine invertebrates, the Sexy Anemone Shrimp are intolerant of high nitrates or copper levels, and iodine levels in the water must be correct to promote proper molting. The Sexy Anemone Shrimp maintains a symbiotic relationship with its host Anemone and will get a portion of its food by eating small food items that it can scavenge from what the Anemone is feeding on. However, its diet should be supplemented with flaked and frozen foods, plankton, and other similar type meaty items.
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Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp
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(Lysmata amboinensis) Easy Peaceful 2" Carnivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Red, White Indo-Pacific Hippolytidae Shrimp The Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp is one of the most popular and common species of Shrimp found in the home aquarium trade. It goes by a multitude of names including: the Indo-Pacific White-Banded Cleaner Shrimp, Indo-Pacific White-Striped Cleaner Shrimp, Scarlet Skunk Cleaner Shrimp and Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp. It may also be called the Red Skunk Cleaner Shrimp because of the very distinct two bright red stripes surrounding one white stripe running down its back. Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp is not only an attractive easy to keep species, but it also performs a valuable service in the aquarium cleaning parasites and dead tissue from many fish species. All of these positive attributes make the Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp a sought after addition for both reef and fish only aquariums. The Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp is equally at home singularly or in small groups, where it will set up a cleaning station on coral reefs or rubble, waiting for fish to come and be cleaned. The Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp feeds on ectoparasites or dead tissue that it picks from the body and oral cavities/gills of fish, both in the wild or in the aquarium environment. This helps to protect the fish from contracting diseases and infections, which makes this species both a colorful and beneficial addition to any aquarium. Many fish value its services so highly that they will allow it to clean the inside of their mouths, and not harm it. Some fish, though, such as Hawkfish, Lionfish, and some predatory shrimp and crabs may eat the Scarlet Skunk Cleaner Shrimp and should not be kept with this species. Like most invertebrates, the Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp will not tolerate copper or high levels of nitrates in the aquarium, but will require correct levels of iodine in the water to promote proper molting. Overall this species is very easy to keep within the home aquarium, since it does not have any special water, lighting or feeding requirements. Some rock work, caves and crevices should be present in the aquarium to provide adequate shelter for this species. In addition to the parasites and dead tissue that the Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp will consume while cleaning fish species, it should also be offered meaty foods such as freeze dried, frozen, and dry flake foods. When not performing cleaning duties at its "cleaning station" on the reef the Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp will scavenge for leftover meaty foods. Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp provide a cleaning station for fish to come and be cleaned. The Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp feeds on ectoparasites or dead tissue that it picks from the body and oral cavities/gills of many species of fish. This also helps to protect the fish from contracting diseases and infections. Many fish value its services so highly that they will allow it to clean the inside of their mouths, and not harm it.
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Saron Shrimp
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(Saron marmoratus) Easy Peaceful 2" Carnivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons No 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Brown, Tan, Green, Red Hawaiian Islands, Indo-Pacific Hippolytidae Shrimp The Saron Shrimp, or as it is also commonly referred to as the Marble Shrimp, is a easily cared for species that is perfect for reef aquariums. During daylight the Saron Shrimp is a brown color with green spots; however, these green spots will have variable amounts of white speckling. The Saron Shrimp is nocturnal, and at night, the color of its body turns primarily red, which helps it blend into the shadows of the twilight. The legs have darker brown bands on a brown background with alternating white speckled bands and their first pair of walking legs are elongated. Tufts of cirri (feathery appendages) are found decorating the back of the males. When introduced into the marine aquarium, the Saron Shrimp will need a dark place in which to hide and hangout until dusk. Initially the Saron Shrimp will come out only at night, but after acclimating, it will start to wander about during the daylight. The Saron Shrimp is usually found in the coral rubble at the base of the reef or in low lying crevices within the rock. As with most all invertebrate species it is intolerant of copper or high nitrates, and will require a correct level of iodine in the water for proper molting. As with most shrimp the Saron Shrimp is primarily a scavenger and will comb the substrate of the aquarium looking for any leftover meaty items. It's diet should also be supplemented with meaty foods such as, brine shrimp, plankton, flaked food, frozen food, and small pieces of fish.
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Red Snapping Shrimp
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(Alpheus sp.) Easy Peaceful 2" Omnivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Calcium, Magnesium, Iodine, Trace Elements Red, Purple, Orange, White Indo-Pacific, Japan Alpheidae Shrimp The Red Snapping Shrimp is also commonly referred to as the Symbiosis Shrimp and Pistol Shrimp. Red Snapping Shrimp are found in a variety of colorations and can vary in size a fair amount. Red Snapping Shrimp are not easily sexed, but the males of many species are thought to have a larger pincher. This species gets its name from the sound it makes comes from an appendage on the pincher which moves when the pincher is opened or closed and water is ejected. The Red Snapping Shrimp can be easily confused with Mantis Shrimp if judged by sound only, but unlike the Mantis Shrimp, it is not harmful and will not pose any threat to other tank inhabitants, with the possible exception of smaller shrimp. Like other shrimp species, the Red Snapping Shrimp is an excellent scavenger and will help keep the aquarium clean and free of excess foodstuffs rotting on the substrate. The name Symbiotic Shrimp comes from the equally beneficial relationship the Red Snapping Shrimp has with gobies (e.g.;Amblyeleotris or Stonogobiops). The goby, with better eyesight, warns the shrimp of predators, while the Red Snapping Shrimp share its food with the goby. Depending upon the species, Red Snapping Shrimp may also have symbiotic relationships with sponges, corals, or anemones (e.g.; Bartholomea annulata). This species thrives in environments with sand, rock caves, and dim lighting. Also if kept in pairs, one will often stand guard at the burrow while the other is inside. The Red Snapping Shrimp is intolerant of copper or high nitrate levels, but needs a correct level of iodine in the water to promote proper molting. Red Snapping Shrimp will readily feed on freeze-dried and frozen foods and bottom feeder tablets, as well as scavenge for algae in the aquarium. Along with scavenging and keeping the tank free of excess food, this species is beneficial to the aquarium in that it churns the sand looking for food which helps keep the sand bottom free of dead spots.
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Peppermint Shrimp
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(Lysmata wurdemanni) Easy Peaceful 2" Carnivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Red, Pink, White Caribbean Hippolytidae Shrimp The Peppermint Shrimp, or as it is also commonly known as in the aquarium hobby as the Veined Shrimp, or Caribbean Cleaner Shrimp, is part of the "cleaner" shrimp family, but is considered to be more of a scavenger. The body of the Peppermint Shrimp is mostly red with yellowish white accents in vertical stripes and other varying patterns. Peppermint Shrimp is sometimes confused with its Pacific cousin, Rhynchocinetes durbanensis, which has a pointed nose and inter-spaced white stripes over its body. In general the Peppermint Shrimp is a very peaceful species that will scavenge the rock work and substrate within the aquarium looking for leftover meaty foods to consume. This species is an excellent cleaner for both community and reef aquariums. The Peppermint Shrimp is usually found living in caves and crevices of the reef, sometimes in the core of the pipe sponges or other similar areas. The Peppermint Shrimp is very sociable and will live peacefully with almost all reef inhabitants. The Peppermint Shrimp will generally spend its time savaging the reef for any meaty foods that it can find. While it is in the cleaner shrimp family, the Peppermint Shrimp is more of a scavenger than a parasite cleaner, and is not known for cleaning parasites off of fish. The Peppermint Shrimp will live with others of its own kind or pretty much any species of invertebrate, coral or fish as it is an extremely peaceful species. It will not tolerate copper or high levels of nitrates in the aquarium, and will also require iodine for proper molting of its carapace. In addition to what it obtains from scavenging, the diet of the Peppermint Shrimp should consist of any type of meaty prepared foods, such as, flake, frozen, freeze-dried or fresh chopped fish or mussels. Supplemental feedings will only be necessary if there is not enough leftover foods for the Peppermint Shrimp to scavenge for within the aquarium.
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Camel Shrimp
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(Rhynchocinetes durbanensis) Easy Peaceful 2" Omnivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Red, White, Pink Caribbean Hippolytidae Shrimp The Camel Shrimp is also commonly referred to as the Hinge-beak Shrimp, Dancing Shrimp, or Candy Shrimp within the aquarium trade. It is distinguished by a movable rostrum (beak) that is usually angled upwards. The Camel Shrimp has a varied pattern of red and white stripes on its body, with claws located directly in front of its body. The males of its species tend to have larger chelipeds (claws) than the females. Camel Shrimp prefer to congregate with others of their own kind in rock crevasses, under overhangs, or in the coral rubble. Plentiful caves and crevices for hiding in are necessary to properly house the Camel Shrimp, especially when it is molting as its protective shell is compromised. It is ideal to keep a small group of Camel Shrimp in the aquarium environment as they prefer to live in small groups. The Camel Shrimp is usually found living in caves and crevices of the reef, usually in small groups of four to six individuals. The Camel Shrimp is very sociable and will live peacefully with almost all reef inhabitants; however, it may nip at colonial anemones, disc anemones, and soft leather corals but will generally leaves bubble coral and stinging anemones alone. The Camel Shrimp will generally spend its time savaging the reef for any meaty foods that it can find. While it is in the cleaner shrimp family, the Camel Shrimp is more of a scavenger than a parasite cleaner, and is not known for cleaning parasites off of fish. They will live with others of their own kind or pretty much any species of invertebrate, coral or fish as they are an extremely peaceful species. Camel Shrimp will not tolerate copper or high levels of nitrates in the aquarium, and will also require iodine for proper molting of its carapace. In addition to what it obtains from scavenging, the diet of the Camel Shrimp should consist of any type of meaty prepared foods, such as, flake, frozen, freeze-dried or fresh chopped fish or mussels. Supplemental feedings will only be necessary if there is not enough leftover foods for the Camel Shrimp to scavenge for within the aquarium.
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Bumble Bee Shrimp
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(Gnathophyllum americanum) Moderate Peaceful 2" Carnivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Brown, White, Orange, Yellow Western Atlantic Gnathophyllidae Shrimp The Bumble Bee Shrimp, also commonly known as the Striped Harlequin Shrimp, is found throughout the Indo-Pacific. They are small shrimp only attaining a maximum size of about 2 inches. Their body is yellow or white in coloration with black stripes giving them a similar appearance to a bumblebee, while the legs and tail may also have orange markings. Bumble Bee Shrimp are similar to Harlequin shrimp and feed upon the tube feet of echinoderms. The Bumble Bee Shrimp is best kept as pairs in a small nano aquarium with moderate light to accommodate easy viewing. Bumble Bee Shrimp may also be suitable for smaller reef aquariums with other very peaceful inhabitants and no boisterous species being present. As with most marine invertebrate and fish species the Bumble Bee Shrimp requires some live rock in order to provide it with proper habitat and a place to retreat to when it feels threatened. They cannot tolerate copper or high nitrates, and iodine levels must be correct and maintained to ensure proper molting. The Bumble Bee Shrimp will feed upon the tube feet of echinoderms, but do not require them for survival. They will also feed on offerings of pieces of frozen meaty foods such as brine or mysis shrimp, cockle, or small pieces of fish. Bumble Bee Shrimp should be offered these foods daily.
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Bullseye Pistol Shrimp
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(Alpheus soror) Easy Peaceful 2" Omnivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons With Caution 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Orange, Tan, Blue Caribbean Alpheidae Shrimp The Bullseye Pistol Shrimp has a bright yellow/orange coloration on its body with purple claws and its namesake blue Bullseye dot on each side of the body. The Bullseye Shrimp is also often commonly referred to as the Blue Spot Snapping Shrimp. The Bullseye Pistol Shrimp can make a clicking or popping sound from an appendage on the pincher, which moves when the pincher is opened or closed and water is ejected. The sound is very similar to a sound made by the Mantis Shrimp, and it judged solely on sound the Bullseye Pistol Shrimp could be confused with the Mantis Shrimp. However, unlike the Manits Shrimp, the Bullseye Pistol Shrimp is an extremely beneficial aquarium inhabitant that will keep the substrate sifted and will keep the aquarium clean and free of any uneaten food. Also unlike the Mantis Shrimp, it is not harmful to other invertebrates or fish and will not pose any threat in the tank, with the possible exception of very small shrimp species. While some pistol shrimp have symbiotic relationship with gobies, the Bullseye Pistol Shrimp is not known for this and tends to live by itself and will move all about the aquarium. Bullseye Pistol Shrimp thrive in environments with sand, rock caves, and dim lighting; however, after time they will become quite used to aquarium lighting and will come out for food during daylight hours. The Bullseye Pistol shrimp is an excellent scavenger and will constantly be digging through the aquarium substrate looking for uneaten food and algae. This species is also known for excavating caves in which it will sleep or retreat to in case it feels threatened. In fact, when kept in pairs one will often stand guard at the burrow while the other is inside. Bullseye Pistol Shrimp are equally at home in either fish-only or reef aquariums, with the only tank unsuitable for them being one with predatory fish species that might eat them. The Pistol Shrimp are intolerant of copper or high nitrate levels, but need a correct level of iodine in the water to promote proper molting. The Bullseye Pistol Shrimp is a true omnivore and will scavenge the aquarium substrate and reef for bits of meaty foods or algae, They will readily accept any meaty freeze-dried, frozen or flake foods or bottom feeder tablets, as well as scavenge for algae and leftovers from fish feeding. The amount and frequency of feedings will depend greatly on the amount of food scraps from fish feedings that are available; however, supplemental feedings of 2-3 times a week will most likely be necessary.
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Blue Banded Coral Shrimp
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(Stenopus tenuirostris) Easy Peaceful 2" Carnivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Red, White, Blue Indo-Pacific Nephropsidae Shrimp The Blue Banded Coral Shrimp or also commonly referred to as the Caribbean Boxing Shrimp, has a Blue body and legs, while the chelae and abdomen have red and sometimes white and red bands. This species is a member of the Stenopodidae or "Boxing Shrimp" because of the large pinchers on their third set of legs. They often hold these pinchers erect, giving the appearance of a boxer ready to fight when they feel threatened or are trying to intimidate a rival. Blue Banded Coral Shrimp are not only attractive in appearance, but are also provide many useful services. Within a community fish aquarium, Blue Banded Coral Shrimp will remove parasites and dead skin from many fish species, while in the reef aquarium environment they are very efficient at hunting down and eating Bristol worms. Be sure to keep this species singularly and to use caution when keeping them with other less boisterous shrimp species. The Blue Banded Coral Shrimp needs adequate room in which to move about the aquarium without its long antennae touching neighboring corals or anemones. It is also recommended to provide a good amount of live rock for the Blue Banded Coral Shrimp to graze for foodstuffs and provide it with caves and crevices when threatened. The Blue Banded Coral Shrimp must be kept singly, or as a true-mated pair, as it is intolerant of others of the same species. They are known to harass other smaller shrimp of different species; such as, peppermint or camel shrimps. It is very hardy species, but must be acclimated slowly to avoid any salinity and/or pH shock and is intolerant of high nitrates or copper levels. It is important to maintain proper iodine levels in the water to allow for proper molting. Blue Banded Coral Shrimp make interesting and beneficial additions to either reef or peaceful community aquariums. In the wild, the Blue Banded Coral Shrimp feeds on parasites, dead tissue removed from fish, and other tiny organisms. In the aquarium environment, it will accept most meaty flake and frozen foods, plankton, and other meaty items. Banded Coral Shrimp are also effective bristle worm hunters in the reef aquarium, helping to keep the population of these pests under control.
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