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Red Finger Gorgonian
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(Diodogorgia nodulifera) Difficult Peaceful Strong Bottom Low Red, Orange Calcium, Strontium, Trace Elements 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Caribbean Anthothelidae Sea Fans The Red Finger Gorgonian is also commonly referred to as Red Tree Gorgonian, or Colored Sea Rod. This species is definitely for expert reef aquarists with established reef systems. The Red Finger Gorgonian requires not only excellent water conditions and proper handling, but it also requires daily feedings of plankton and other foods designed especially for filter feeders. This species is a very attractive branching tree-like coral, that is basically available in two color variations being bright orange-yellow with red and white polyps, or deep red to purple with white polyps. This sea fan will usually grow in small and sparsely branched colonies and is extremely brittle and breaks easily, making it easy to propagate in this manner. The Red Finger Gorgonian is peaceful, but it should be given adequate space away from neighboring corals or anemones so that it is not harmed by more aggressive species and so that it has room to grow. Underwater epoxy is commonly used to anchor its base to a piece of live rock or other suitable location at the bottom of the reef aquarium. It is difficult to maintain even in the well-established reef system, so it should only be attempted by an expert reef keeper. The Red Finger Gorgonian is not photosynthetic and requires a low level of lighting to ward off a build-up of micro algae, but also requires a stronger water flow and the addition of iodine, calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water. All the combined requirements make this species overall difficult to keep and only suitable for certain reef aquarium setups. Since the Red Finger Gorgonian is not photosynthetic, it depends on regular feedings of micro-plankton, live baby brine shrimp or other foods designed for filter feeding corals and invertebrates for its survival. Multiple feedings each day will be required to replicate the food intake this species would have in the wild and to make sure it will survive and thrive in an established reef aquarium.
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Purple Brush Gorgonian
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(Muriceopsis flavida) Moderate Semi-aggressive Medium to Strong All Medium to High Purple, Gray, Brown, Tan Iodine, Calcium, Strontium, Trace elements 72-78º F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Caribbean Plexauridae Sea Fans The Purple Brush Gorgonian is also commonly referred to within the aquarium hobby as the Purple Bush, Lamarck's Gorgonian, Feather Gorgonian, or Rough Sea Plume. It is a branching coral that is closely related to hard corals. The Purple Brush Gorgonian has tall-branched formations of feather-like colonies and has a beautiful purple coloration. The polyps are nocturnal and will feed at night or when the light is dimmed or off, and the branches are bumpy in appearance when the polyps are withdrawn. Underwater epoxy is commonly used to anchor this species to a base of live rock within the reef aquarium. While it is moderately difficult to maintain, the Purple Brush Gorgonian does make a very rewarding addition to the well-established reef system. The Purple Brush Gorgonian is a moderately difficult species to care for in the aquarium environment. It is a semi-aggressive species that should be given adequate space away from neighboring corals or anemones. It requires medium to high lighting along with a medium to strong constant or intermittent water flow, both of which are very important in order to inhibit algae or cyanobacterial growth; as well as, to the overall and long-term health of the species. In the event that it does begin to become covered with algae or cyanobacteria, remove it from the coral immediately, as this will cause rapid tissue deterioration. Algae can be removed by gently scrubbing with the use of a soft brush while soaking the coral in freshwater of the same temperature for approximately 1 minute can combat cyanobacteria. These corals will also benefit from the addition of iodine, calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water. The Purple Tree Gorgonian should be fed a 2 to 3 times a week with a plankton based filter-feeding food. The Purple Tree Gorgonian should also be provided with a varied diet of live or frozen baby brine shrimp, Marine Snow, PhytoPlan and other suitable micro foods.
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Orange Tree Gorgonian
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(Swiftia exserta) Difficult Peaceful Strong Bottom Low Orange, Red Iodine, Calcium, Strontium, Trace elements 72-78º F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Caribbean Anthothelidae Sea Fans The Orange Tree Gorgonian is also commonly referred to within the aquarium hobby as the Orange Sea Fan or Orange Tree coral. It is either orange or orange/red in color and has loose branches forming a fan shape with large red or orange polyps. The Orange Tree Gorgonian is a very impressive species that will make a great showpiece or centerpiece for any reef aquarium. Like other Sea Fans the Orange Tree Gorgonian is very difficult to keep within the aquarium environment and requires specialized care by expert aquarists in a well established reef aquarium in order to survive and thrive. While the Orange Tree Gorgonian is a peaceful species, it should be given adequate space away from neighboring corals or anemones, so that it is not damaged and has room to grow. This species is generally anchored to the reef through the use of underwater epoxy, which can anchor its base to a piece of live rock within the reef aquarium. The Orange Tree Gorgonian is a very challenging species to maintain, as they require supplemental feeding several times per week. The Orange Tree Gorgonian is not photosynthetic and only requires a low level of lighting to ward off a build-up of micro algae, but it will require a stronger water flow and the addition of iodine, calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water to thrive. Because the Orange Tree Gorgonian is not photosynthetic, its survival is dependent on regular and frequent feedings of brine shrimp, baby brine shrimp, or foods designed for filter feeding invertebrates; such as, marine snow or phytoplankton. Do not allow cyanobacteria to form on the branches, as it will cause both the polyps and tissue of the coral to rapidly deteriorate. The Orange Tree Gorgonian should only be attempted by expert reef aquarist within a well established reef aquarium.
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