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Nuclear Death Palys
(Zoanthus gigantus) Easy Semi-aggressive Medium to Strong Middle to Top Moderate to High Purple, Green, White Magnesium, Iodine, Trace Elements 72-79° F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4; dKH 8-12 Indo-Pacific Zoanthidae Polyp Corals Nuclear Death Palythoas (Zoanthus gigantus) are a popular morph produced by combining Purple Death and Nuclear Green Palys. The strong demand amongst reef hobbyists for this color morph has fueled coral farmers to begin producing them in larger numbers, which is helping to increase their availability within the hobby. Hobbyists, collectors and vendors have found that the standard scientific naming convention lacked the detail necessary to describe many of the new zoa color morphs, thus the new generation of catchy named zoas was born. The distinctive features of this species include: its large polyp size, alternating green and purple striped skirt, purple ring with iridescent red coloration, green middle, purple lips and white mouth which all combine to define what is now grouped as the "Nuclear Death" color variant. Nuclear Death Palythoas are similar to other Palys in that they are relatively easy to care for and can be successfully housed in a variety of reef aquarium setups. They require medium to strong lighting and moderate to strong water flow in order to allow their symbiotic algae zooxanthellae to thrive and produce food for the coral. While most Nuclear Death Palythoas morphs acquire the majority of their nutrition from photosynthesis and do not require supplemental feeding; some individuals have acquired higher growth rates through supplemental feeding of very fine foods intended for filter feeding invertebrates. The addition of reef additives like: calcium, strontium, iodine and trace elements along with occasional feedings of micro-plankton and similar foodstuffs should allow for the best possible growth rate. Nuclear Death Palythoas kept under proper aquarium conditions will spread or colonize nearby rocks and hard surfaces. In order to keep them separated from other coral species the hobbyist should provide gaps between the rock aqua-scaping, in order to create a boundary to limit the carpeting or horizontal growth of the Polyps. Proper placement is important when keeping Polyps with other corals, as Polyps will crowd out other corals by stinging them repeatedly as they grown in and around them. Hobbyists are recommended to start their Nuclear Death Palythoas in a lower position on the reef and move them up the reef after they have had a chance to acclimate to the aquarium. Nuclear Death Palythoas receive the vast majority of their nutrition through the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae contained within the coral. They receive other nutrients from dissolved minerals that they filter from the water currents. They will also benefit from the addition of reef supplements containing calcium, magnesium, iodine and trace elements. They can also be periodically offered meaty foods like micro-plankton, baby brine shrimp and other similar fare.
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Fire and Ice Zoanthids
(Zoanthus sp.) Easy Semi-aggressive Medium to Strong Bottom to Middle Moderate to High Blue, Red Magnesium, Iodine, Trace Elements 72-76° F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4; dKH 8-12 Indo-Pacific Zoanthidae Polyp Corals Fire and Ice Zoas (Zoanthus sp.) are a beautiful species of Zoanthid that are sought after for their brilliant steel blue and red coloration. Aqua-cultered Fire and Ice Zoas tend to do best in the aquarium environment, as many wild caught specimens are from deeper locations on the reef. The environment of deep reef species is often difficult to completely reproduce in the aquarium environment. In the case of Fire and Ice Zoas many hobbyists have had good success by placing them lower in the aquarium in a location that receives strong but filtered lighting. Fire and Ice Zoas also tend to do better when kept at more moderate water temperatures ranging from 72° to 76° F. These conditions are recommended as a good starting point when first introducing this species to the reef aquarium. Given time and gradual adjustments, hobbyists should be able to identify the ideal location in which to keep Fire and Ice Zoas in their reef aquarium. Fire and Ice Zoanthids (like most zoas) should be introduced in the aquarium in a lower position on the reef and then gradually moved up towards the light source. This is done to ensure that they do not experience photo-shock, which can occur when zoas grown under one set of conditions are then immediately introduced to an aquarium with very different conditions. Fire and Ice Zoas are similar to other Colony Polyps in that they are relatively easy to care for and can be successfully housed in a variety of reef aquarium setups. They require medium to strong lighting and moderate to strong water flow in order to allow their symbiotic algae zooxanthellae to thrive and produce food for the coral. While Fire and Ice Zoanthids acquire the majority of their nutrition from photosynthesis, many individuals have acquired higher growth rates through supplemental feeding of very fine foods intended for filter feeding invertebrates. Fire and Ice Colony Polyps will continue to spread or colonize nearby rocks, they can be separated from other coral species by providing gaps between the rock aqua-scaping, in order to create a boundary to limit the carpeting or horizontal growth of the Polyps. Proper placement is important when keeping Polyps with other corals, as Polyps will crowd out other corals by stinging them repeatedly as they grown in and around them. Fire and Ice Zoas receive the vast majority of their nutrition through the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae contained within the coral. They receive other nutrients from dissolved minerals that they filter from the water currents. They will also benefit from the addition of reef supplements containing calcium, magnesium, iodine and trace elements. They can also be periodically offered meaty foods like micro-plankton, baby brine shrimp and other similar items. Well established reef aquariums with populations of phyto-plankton work best for all varieties of filter feeders, as they are able to supplement their diet with foods filtered from the water column. The addition of reef additives like: calcium, strontium, iodine and trace elements along with occasional feedings of micro-plankton and similar foodstuffs should allow for the best possible growth rate.
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Purple People Eaters Colony Polyp
(Zoanthus gigantus) Easy Semi-aggressive Medium to Strong Middle to Top Moderate to High Purple, Green Magnesium, Iodine, Trace Elements 72-78&deg F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4; dKH 8-12 Indo-Pacific Zoanthidae Polyp Corals Purple People Eaters Colony Polyp (Zoanthus gigantus) are a popular morph of the "PE" palythoa/zoa line of colony polyps. Purple People Eater (PPE) zoas were one of the first zoa morphs to receive a colorful common name that has since spawned a naming fad amongst the various Zoanthid color morphs. Hobbyists, collectors and vendors have found that the standard scientific naming convention lacked the detail necessary to describe many of the new zoa color morphs, thus the new generation of catchy named zoas was born. The distinctive features of this species including: its size, neon green skirts, deep purple colored plate and its distinctive neon green mouth how helped define what is now grouped as the "People Eaters" feature. The brilliant purple coloration of this giant polyp palythoa/zoa commands attention in even the most elaborate reef aquarium, thus it is often sought after by zoa collectors and reef enthusiasts alike. Purple People Eaters are similar to other Colony Polyps in that they are relatively easy to care for and can be successfully housed in a variety of reef aquarium setups. They require medium to strong lighting and moderate to strong water flow in order to allow their symbiotic algae zooxanthellae to thrive and produce food for the coral. While most People Eater Zoanthid morphs acquire the majority of their nutrition from photosynthesis and do not require supplemental feeding. Some individuals have acquired higher growth rates through supplemental feeding of very fine foods intended for filter feeding invertebrates. The addition of reef additives like: calcium, strontium, iodine and trace elements along with occasional feedings of micro-plankton and similar foodstuffs should allow for the best possible growth rate. Purple People Eaters Zoanthids kept under proper aquarium conditions will spread or colonize nearby rocks and hard surfaces. In order to keep them separated from other coral species the hobbyist should provide gaps between the rock aqua-scaping, in order to create a boundary to limit the carpeting or horizontal growth of the Polyps. Proper placement is important when keeping Polyps with other corals, as Polyps will crowd out other corals by stinging them repeatedly as they grown in and around them. Hobbyists are recommended to start their PPE Zoas in a lower position on the reef and move them up the reef after they have had a chance to acclimate to the aquarium. Purple People Eaters Colony Polyps receive the vast majority of their nutrition through the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae contained within the coral. They receive other nutrients from dissolved minerals that they filter from the water currents. They will also benefit from the addition of reef supplements containing calcium, magnesium, iodine and trace elements. They can also be periodically offered meaty foods like micro-plankton, baby brine shrimp and other similar fare.
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Blue and Green Sympodium
(Sympodium sp.) Easy Peaceful Medium to Strong Middle to High Moderate to High Blue, Green, Red Calcium, Magnesium, Strontium, Iodine, Trace Elements 72-80° F, sg 1.023-1.025, dkh 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4 Indo-Pacific Zoanthidae Polyp Corals Blue and Green Sympodium (Sympodium sp.) grows throughout the reefs and shallow lagoons of the Indo-Pacific ocean. Blue and Green Sympodium is a fast growing species that will colonize or encrust the rocks or shells on which it grows. The growth rate and aquarium behavior of Blue and Green Symodium is very similar to that of the various Xenia species; however, Sympodium sp. is a member of the Zoanthidae family of encrusting polyp corals. Despite only being introduced into the aquarium hobby in the 2010 time frame, Blue and Green Sympodium has become widely available due to its ease of growth and adaptability to the aquarium environment. Given proper aquarium conditions, Blue and Green Sympodium will quickly spread over areas of the reef that it has access too. For this reason it is recommended that hobbyists isolate the coral on rocky formations that are placed at least a few inches from other portions of the reef. This will allow the hobbyist to both get a feel for the rapid growth of the coral and allow its growth to be controlled since it requires a hard surface to grow on and will not grow onto a sandy substrate. Hobbyists will want to maintain Blue and Green Sympodium in reef aquariums that have moderate to high lighting and moderate water flow. Average reef aquariums with typical power compact fluorescent or T-5 fluorescent lighting systems and a tank height of up to 30 inches will require the Blue and Green Sympodium to be place in an upper area on the reef. Reef aquariums with metal halide lighting or high intensity LED lighting systems and a tank height of up to 30 inches will allow for Blue and Green Sympodium to be placed in either an upper or middle location on the reef. The overall height of the aquarium and lighting placement greatly affects how much PAR or (Photosynthetically Active Radiation) is available to the coral, thus coral placement will vary depending on the overall tank conditions. Ideal water flow will be a moderate intensity laminar water flow or wave style water flow provided by either a wave box or multiple power heads positioned to create varied flow. Mature reef aquariums or reef aquariums connected to mature refugiums are ideal as they provide supplemental feeding opportunities via phytoplankton and other micro-organisms present in the water column. Lastly, hobbyists will want to place the Blue and Green Sympodium (Sympodium sp.) coral in an area where its growth can be controlled, as it will spread to neighboring portions of the reef rapidly under ideal conditions. Blue and Green Sympodium polyps receive the majority of their nutrition through the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae contained within the coral. However, they thrive when they receive additional nutrients from phyto-plankton that they filter from the water currents. They will benefit from the addition of reef supplements containing calcium, strontium and trace elements. They can also be periodically offered meaty foods like micro-plankton, cyclop-eeze, marine snow, baby brine shrimp and other similar foods.
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Red People Eaters Colony Polyp
(Zoanthus gigantus) Easy Semi-aggressive Medium to Strong Middle to Top Moderate to High Red, Purple Magnesium, Iodine, Trace Elements 72-78°F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4; dKH 8-12 Indo-Pacific Zoanthidae Polyp Corals Red People Eaters Colony Polyp (Zoanthus gigantus) are by far one of the more popular species of Zoanthidae found within the aquarium hobby trade. The popularity of the Red People Eaters Colony Polyp has led them to be fully identified down to the species level, which is rare amongst zoanthids as most are not fully identified. Red People Eater Zoas are considered relatively slow growers, but overall a very hardy zoanthid species. They have a large oral disc that because of its large size causes many hobbyists to confuse them with similarly colored Palythoa species. (Zoanthus gigantus) are an excellent coral species for a wide variety of aquarium sizes and hobbyist skill levels, as they are equally at home in the beginners nano aquarium as that of the advanced reef aquarium hobbyists full blown reef tank. Red People Eaters are similar to other Colony Polyps in that they are relatively easy to care for and can be successfully housed in a variety of reef aquarium setups. They require medium to strong lighting and moderate to strong water flow in order to allow their symbiotic algae zooxanthellae to thrive and produce food for the coral. While most People Eater Zoanthid morphs acquire the majority of their nutrition from photosynthesis and do not require supplemental feeding. Some individuals have acquired higher growth rates through supplemental feeding of very fine foods intended for filter feeding invertebrates. The addition of reef additives like: calcium, strontium, iodine and trace elements along with occasional feedings of micro-plankton and similar foodstuffs should allow for the best possible growth rate. Red People Eaters Colony Polyps will continue to spread or colonize nearby rocks, they can be separated from other coral species by providing gaps between the rock aqua-scaping, in order to create a boundary to limit the carpeting or horizontal growth of the Polyps. Proper placement is important when keeping Polyps with other corals, as Polyps will crowd out other corals by stinging them repeatedly as they grown in and around them. Red People Eaters Colony Polyps receive the vast majority of their nutrition through the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae contained within the coral. They receive other nutrients from dissolved minerals that they filter from the water currents. They will also benefit from the addition of reef supplements containing calcium, magnesium, iodine and trace elements. They can also be periodically offered meaty foods like micro-plankton, baby brine shrimp and other similar fare.
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Yellow Colony Polyp
(Parazoanthus gracilis) Easy Semi-aggressive Medium Any Moderate Yellow Trace elements 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025 Indo-Pacific Parazoanthidae Polyp Corals Yellow Colony Polyps are an attractive and easy to maintain Parazoanthus species best known for their distinctive yellow coloration and long tentacles. Their hardy nature and modest lighting and water flow requirements make them ideal for beginning reef aquarium hobbyists. In fact most hobbyists find that the trick to caring for Yellow Colony Polyps is to restrain them from over growing the entire aquarium. It is recommended that they be isolated on a piece of rock or coral rubble separate from the main reef in order to keep them from spreading out of control. To allow the Yellow Colony Polyp to spread onto the reef, the hobbyist need simply place the rock containing the Polyps next to a bare rock and they will quickly begin colonizing the new real estate. Yellow Colony Polyps require only moderate lighting and water flow in order to grow and thrive. They should be kept in an establish aquarium with clean water and stable water parameters. They can be placed at any level within the aquarium as long as they have rocks or coral rubble to attach themselves. They do not require extremely bright lighting, but they should be provided a proper marine reef aquarium light spectrum ranging from 10,000K to 20,000k daylight and actinic blue lighting. Power compact fluorescent, T-type fluorescent and LED style lighting designed for marine aquariums should be more than sufficient for the Yellow Colony Polyp to support the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae hosted on its body. Yellow Colony Polyps are peaceful species that should not pose any danger to other nearby coral species. Yellow Colony Polyps is heavily predated by fish species that eat corals, thus should not be kept with fish species that are known for eating or picking at corals. Yellow Colony Polyps are photosynthetic and receive the bulk of their nutrition from the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae which it hosts. While supplemental feedings are not required, they will increase the growth rate of the colony. Weekly feedings of brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, cyclop-eeze or other similar meaty foods with greatly accelerate the growth of the Yellow Colony Polyp colonies.
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Eagle Eye Polyps
(Zoanthus sp.) Easy Semi-Aggressive Medium Any Moderate to High Green, Orange, Blue Calcium, Trace Elements 72-78° F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4; dKH 8-12 Indonesia Zoanthidae Polyp Corals Eagle Eye Polyps are a species of Zoanthus that originate from the tropical waters around Indonesia. While their ease of care makes them suitable for beginning reef aquarium hobbyists, they are also sought after by more experience reef aquarium hobbyists due to their brilliant coloration and pattern. The alternating pattern of blue, orange and green, make an established colony of Eagle Eye Polyps a truly beautiful sight to see. They live in colonies with multiple individuals living side by side on a rock and if provided with the right conditions, will spread out over adjacent rocks. Eagle Eye Colony Polyps should be given space between themselves and their neighbors so that they have room to expand without coming into contact with other corals. They are capable of stinging other polyps and corals, thus are considered to be Semi-Aggressive. Over time the Eagle Eye Polyp colony will spread to adjacent rocks and form a colorful living carpet atop the rocks, reminiscent of a field of flowing flowers. Eagle Eye Polyps are similar to other Colony Polyps in that they are relatively easy to care for and can be successfully housed in a variety of reef aquarium setups. They require medium to strong lighting and moderate water flow in order to provide their symbiotic algae zooxanthellae to thrive and produce food for the coral. Eagle Eye Polyps will also benefit from the addition of reef additives like: calcium, strontium, iodine and trace elements along with occasional feedings of micro-plankton foodstuffs. While Eagle Eye Colony Polyps will continue to spread or "colonize" nearby rocks, they can be separated from other coral species by providing gaps between the rock aqua-scaping, in order to create a boundary to limit the carpeting or horizontal growth of the Polyps. Proper placement is important when keeping Polyps with other corals, as Polyps will "crowd out" other corals by stinging them repeatedly as they grown in and around them. Eagle Eye Colony Polyps receive the vast majority of their nutrition through the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae contained within the coral. They receive other nutrients from dissolved minerals that they filter from the water currents. They will benefit from the addition of reef supplements containing calcium, strontium and trace elements. They can also be periodically offered meaty foods like micro-plankton, baby brine shrimp and other similar fare.
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Starburst Polyp
(Pachyclavularia sp.) Easy Peaceful Medium to Strong Middle or Top Medium to High White, Brown, Green Iodine, Trace elements 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Indo-Pacific Clavulariidae Polyp Corals The Starburst Polyps are also commonly referred to within the marine aquarium hobby as Star, Eight Tentacle, Mat, or Daisy Polyps. They are generally purchased encrusted to a piece of live rock that can then be placed within the reef aquarium, where they will begin to grow out onto nearby rocks. They are usually white or brown with a white dot in the center of each polyp, although, some of the more rare Starburst Polyps are green. The green specimens have been called Clavularia viridis; however, they are now identified as a Pachyclavularia sp. They have the distinctive eight-leaved tentacles on each polyp and are colonial animals with several individual polyps attached to a single piece of live rock. Starburst polyps are relatively easy to maintain in an established reef aquarium with relatively strong water currents and intense lighting. Starburst Polyps are encrusting colonial corals, in that under proper conditions they will rapidly grow over adjacent rock work, coral and aquarium glass. Therefore, they should be carefully placed where they will have both proper lighting and water movement, but also area to expand without conflicts with other coral species. They are a peaceful coral, but they are armed with the defensive capability of being able to retract or deflate each of their polyps in response to predation. They will not harm other corals that are placed close to their colony, but are susceptible to being damaged by any aggressive corals in the reef aquarium. They require intense medium to high light level (metal halide or power compact) combined with a medium to strong water movement within the aquarium and should be placed from the middle to the top of the aquarium. In an established reef aquarium, they are easy to maintain and make an excellent candidate for both beginning and advanced reef aquarists. To provide for their continued good health, they will also require the addition of iodine and other trace elements to the water. The symbiotic algae zooxanthellae hosted within their bodies provide the majority of their nutritional requirements through photosynthesis. This makes high quality intense lighting very important for this species as it will allow them to produce the necessary amounts of food. They also benefit from weekly feedings of micro-plankton or other foods designed for filter feeding invertebrates.
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Clove Polyp
(Clavularia sp.) Easy Semi-aggressive Medium Middle or Top Moderate Brown, Green, Tan, Pink, Purple, White Iodine, Trace Elements, Strontium 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Indo-Pacific Clavulariidae Polyp Corals The Clove Polyp or Clavularia Clove Polyps goes by a few names including: Eight Tentacle Polyps, or Encrusting Polyps. The Clove Polyp not only has many names, it can also be found in many colors, such as, brown, tan, pink, purple, green, or white. However, their polyps have a single distinctive eight-leaved tentacles associated with all the members of this family. They are colonial animals with several individual polyp colonies living close together and usually attached to a single piece of live rock. It is important to space this coral carefully within the aquarium, so that it may grow and not be stung and damaged by other aggressive corals. By keeping adequate space between themselves and other corals, the Clove Polyp colonies will have room to grow and a buffer from other aggressive corals can be maintained. Clove Polyps are not difficult to maintain within a reef aquarium and only require moderate lighting and water movement. The most important aspect of caring for this species is to provide proper mid to top level placement within the aquarium, and to place them where they can expand their colonies without coming into contact with other aggressive corals. Clove Polyps require the addition of iodine and other trace elements to the water to promote health and growth. This species will grow rapidly in an established reef aquarium by encrusting over adjacent rock work or even other less aggressive corals. Clove Polyps receive their nutrition through the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae hosted within their bodies, which is responsible for providing the majority of their nutritional requirements via the algaes light drive process of photosynthesis. Clove Polyps will also benefit from weekly feedings of micro-plankton or foods designed for filter feeding invertebrates.
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Button Polyp
(Protopalythoa sp.) Easy Semi-Aggressive Medium Middle or Bottom Moderate Brown, Green, Tan, Yellow, Blue, Pink Iodine, Trace Elements 72-78° F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4; dKH 8-12 South Pacific Zoanthidae Polyp Corals The Protopalythoa Button Polyp Corals, are also commonly referred to within the aquarium hobby as Moon Polyps, Encrusting Anemones, or Sea Mats, are generally brown or tan in color, but may also be green and fluoresce under actinic lighting. Button Polyp Corals are a colonial animal with multiple individual polyps attached to a piece of live rock or coral rubble. Over time with proper aquarium conditions Button Polyp Corals will grow out with more and more colonies being produced and over time can create a mat or carpet like appearance. Button Polyp Corals are very easy to maintain in an established reef aquarium with only moderate water flow and lighting being required. Their polyps have the ability to sting other animals and are semi-aggressive; therefore, they need to have space between their colony and any other neighbors. Button Polyp Corals grow rapidly and will crowd out their neighbors including any sessile life; it is this rapid growth and the resulting appearance that gives them the name Sea Mats. Button Polyp Corals will reproduce easily in the reef aquarium by budding (splitting off a portion of their base or mouth), which will increase the size of their colony. For continued good health, they will also require the addition of iodine and other trace elements to the water. As with other semi-aggressive fast growing corals, be sure to place this species where it will have room to grow without coming into contact with other specimens. Button Polyp Corals receive most of their nutrition through the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae hosted within their bodies, which provides the majority of their nutritional requirements through photosynthesis. Button Polyp Corals will also benefit from weekly feedings of micro-plankton or brine shrimp which should be fed to each individual of the colony.
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