Categories
Red Mushroom Coral
(Actinodiscus sp.) Easy Semi-aggressive Low to Medium Bottom to Middle Moderate Red, Pink, Maroon Calcium, Iodine, Strontium, Trace elements 72-80° F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Indo-Pacific, South Pacific Actinodiscidae Mushroom Corals The Red Mushroom Coral (Actinodiscus sp.) is a hardy and easy to maintain species, which is also very colorful and enjoyable to keep. Red Mushroom Corals are also referred to as Mushroom Anemones, Actinodiscus Mushroom and Disc Anemones. This variety of mushroom coral varies in color from a light pink to a dark maroon depending on lighting and aquarium conditions. They will also fluoresce when kept under actinic lighting. Red Mushroom Corals are a wonderful invertebrate for bottom placement in a reef aquarium, which over time will reproduce forming a carpet covering the rock work and nearby sand in a brilliant fluorescent red. In general, Red Mushroom Corals will prosper with only a medium light intensity, and should be placed in the lower areas of an aquarium if kept under high intensity reef lighting. Red Mushroom Corals require a low to moderate indirect water flow in which to provide supplementary food sources such as photo-plankton and carry away waste products created by the coral. Too direct or too intense a water flow will inhibit the Red Mushroom Coral from fully expanding and will overtime lead to poor health. Optimum placement for this species is on the bottom of the aquarium in a spot with indirect water flow. Bottom placement will also keep the Red Mushroom Coral from receiving too intense lighting; as well as, allow it to grow outward. When placing the Red Mushroom Coral also keep in mind that it is a semi-aggressive species that will require adequate space between itself and other corals or sessile invertebrates (also note that this species will grow out horizontally over time). The Red Mushroom Coral receives most of its nutritional requirements through the photosynthesis of the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae, which it hosts. However, it also feeds on other nutrients and particle matter present in established marine aquariums. The Red Mushroom Coral will also benefit from additional feedings in the form of micro-plankton or other foods designed for filter feeding invertebrates. Each mushroom polyp in the colony is a distinct individual, thus supplemental foods should be gently sprayed over the entire colony to make sure that each polyp has an opportunity to feed.
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Ricordea Mushroom
(Ricordea florida) Easy Semi-aggressive Medium to Strong Middle to Bottom Low to Moderate orange, yellow, blue, red, purple Calcium, Strontium, Trace Elements 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025 Caribbean, Tropical Western Atlantic Ricordeidae Mushroom Corals Ricordea florida mushroom corals are indigenous to the tropical Western Atlantic, where they can be found in a variety of color variations including blues, pinks, oranges, purples, reds and yellows. Their bright coloration, relative ease of care and hardiness towards many fish species have made them one of the best ways to add dramatic color to FOWLR or reef aquariums. Minimal upkeep and a wide tolerance for lighting conditions and aquarium placement also make the Ricordea florida mushroom a good beginner species for aquarium hobbyists new to keeping corals. In the wild, Ricordea florida are frequently found growing in large colonies that cover rock and coral rubble throughout shallow, turbid waters. They are also found in deeper waters, but tend to be in smaller colonies or as solitary animals. Their coloration is heavily impacted by their environment and current water conditions, thus water flow, temperature, lighting, etc. will factor in to the corals coloration and depth of color. As with most other marine animals, Ricordea florida do best when placed in an aquarium that provides them habitat that resembles their natural surroundings in the wild. Fortunately for marine aquarists, Ricordea florida mushrooms are fairly tolerant of a wide range of both lighting and water flow conditions. However, it is important to properly acclimate them to the aquariums water conditions via drip acclimation, which will let them slowly adjust to the aquariums water temperature, salinity, etc. In short, R. florida tolerate bright reef lighting much better than most other mushroom corals, but they also do fine in less well-lit situations such as shaded areas of the aquarium, extra tall aquariums or in tanks without metal halides. Under metal halides, it is recommended to consider a lower, somewhat shaded or vertical placement in the aquarium. With less intense reef lighting, a horizontal placement in the middle portion of the aquarium will likely suit them best. After placement, the aquarist should carefully observe the Ricordea specimen to determine its overall happiness with its current location. If the specimen grows paler and shrinks, the lighting may be too intense or if an originally brightly colored specimen retains its size but loses some of its intensity, the lighting should probably be stronger. They can be kept with a wide variety of tank mates including many fish species that are normally too aggressive to be kept with other coral species. They should be place on rocks that do not connect to rocks hosting other coral specimens or at least 4 to 6 inches from existing corals so that they do not sting one another. Captive propagation of Ricordea florida is easily achieved by carefully cutting the individual animal in half straight through the oral disc, column and pedal disc. Care must be taken to insure that the tools used are clean so as to avoid any bacterial contamination. Propagating Ricordea in this manner is easy for the experienced hobbyists and has a very high success rate with the animals healing fully within several weeks under ideal aquarium conditions. Ricordea florida mushrooms obtain their nutritional needs primarily from the symbiotic zooxanthellae that they host within their bodies. They also filter feed on plankton and small crustaceans that they filter from the water column. Ricordea florida mushrooms are often found in shaded locations of the reef in their natural habitat, and many hobbyists have found through experience that many Ricordea specimens actually do better when not exposed directly to bright reef lighting (e.g. metal halide lights) in the aquarium. The reasons for this are not totally understood, but probably have something to do with the animal being able to rely on a combination of photosynthetic and chemosynthetic food production. They will benefit from bi-weekly target feeding of phytoplankton and zooplankton (or commercially available foods designed for filter feeding invertebrates), but this is not absolutely necessary.
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Hairy Mushroom Coral
(Rhodactis indosinensis) Easy Semi-aggressive Medium Middle Medium to High Purple, Green, Brown, Tan Iodine, Trace elements 72-78º F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Indo-Pacific Discosomatidae Mushroom Corals The Hairy Mushroom Coral or Rhodactis Coral is a member of the order Corallimorpharia and occurs in multiple colors including brown, tan, green and purple. Rhodactis corals in general are very hardy and are considered excellent choices for beginning reef aquarists. The Hairy Mushroom Coral is a common form of Rhodactis coral that is found in most local fish stores that carry marine fish and corals. The Hairy Mushroom Coral gets its common name from the hair-like tentacles that cover the majority of its surface area, thus giving it a hairy appearance. Under proper conditions this species is known to grow quite quickly and should be given enough room to expand laterally as it grows. Another reason to provide ample room for this coral is that it is aggressive to other corals if it comes in contact with. Overall though, this is an excellent species for beginning reef aquarists. The Hairy Mushroom Coral like all corals requires good water quality, but unlike many other coral species only requires medium light intensity and medium water movement. In shallow aquariums Hairy Mushroom Corals do well when placed in the middle areas of the aquarium or placed in higher areas of the aquarium in deeper tanks, with plenty of room for them to grow laterally. If higher intensity lighting is used, it is best to place the Hairy Mushroom Coral in a lower area of the tank to prevent bleaching. One should not allow this species to come into contact with of corals or sessile invertebrates as it will overgrow and damage or possibly kill them. Ideally this species does best when it receives alternating or indirect medium water currents, as some of its nutrition comes from filter feeding on plankton and other micro-foods. Most of the nutrition the Hairy Mushroom Coral receives is provided by photosynthesis of the hosted symbiotic algae zooxanthellae contained within the coral. However, they also filter small plankton or other filter foods from the water and may be fed plankton, brine or other similar smaller meaty items.
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Green Mushroom Coral
(Actinodiscus sp.) Easy Semi-aggressive Low to Medium Bottom to Middle Medium Green, Blue, Emerald Calcium, Iodine, Strontium, Trace elements 72-80° F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Indo-Pacific, South Pacific Actinodiscidae Mushroom Corals The Green Mushroom Coral (Actinodiscus sp.) is a hardy and easy to maintain species, which is also very colorful and enjoyable to keep. Green Mushroom Corals are also referred to as Mushroom Anemones, Actinodiscus Mushroom and Disc Anemones. This variety of mushroom coral varies in color from a light blue/green to an emerald green depending on lighting and aquarium conditions. They will also fluoresce when kept under actinic lighting. Green Mushroom Corals are a wonderful invertebrate for bottom placement in a reef aquarium, which over time will reproduce forming a carpet covering the rock work and nearby sand in a brilliant fluorescent green. In general, Green Mushroom Corals will prosper with only a medium light intensity, and should be placed in the lower areas of an aquarium if kept under high intensity reef lighting. Green Mushroom Corals require a low to moderate indirect water flow in which to provide supplementary food sources such as photo-plankton and carry away waste products created by the coral. Too direct or too intense a water flow will inhibit the Green Mushroom Coral from fully expanding and will overtime lead to poor health. Optimum placement for this species is on the bottom of the aquarium in a spot with indirect water flow. Bottom placement will also keep the Green Mushroom Coral from receiving too intense lighting; as well as, allow it to grow outward. When placing the Green Mushroom Coral also keep in mind that it is a semi-aggressive species that will require adequate space between itself and other corals or sessile invertebrates (also note that this species will grow out horizontally over time). The Green Mushroom Coral receives most of its nutritional requirements through the photosynthesis of the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae, which it hosts. However, it also feeds on other nutrients and particle matter present in established marine aquariums. The Green Mushroom Coral will also benefit from additional feedings in the form of micro-plankton or other foods designed for filter feeding invertebrates. Each mushroom polyp in the colony is a distinct individual, thus supplemental foods should be gently sprayed over the entire colony to make sure that each polyp has an opportunity to feed.
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Giant Cup Mushroom Coral
(Amplexidiscus fenestrafer) Easy Semi-aggressive Low to Medium Middle Moderate Tan, Brown, Green Iodine, Trace elements 72-78º F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Indo-Pacific Discosomatidae Mushroom Corals The Giant Cup Mushroom Coral is also commonly known as the Giant Disc Anemone, Giant Mushroom Anemone, or Giant Flower Coral, and sometimes the Large Elephant Ear within the marine aquarium hobby. Giant Cup Mushroom Coral is a piscivore, and it uses an attracting scent to lure fishes into the folds of its oral disc, where it slowly closes around the fish until it has trapped it within the sac formed, and then it digests the fish with mesenterial filaments. While there is an inherit risk with keeping this species with fish species, it is possible to keep in the reef aquarium. The Giant Cup Mushroom Coral reproduces by pedal laceration or budding, while fission may occur occasionally. The Giant Cup Mushroom Coral is very easy to maintain in the reef aquarium with only a medium light level combined with a low to medium water movement required for its well being. It can expand to over 12 inches in diameter during the day and is considered semi-aggressive and requires adequate space between itself and other corals. When a fish brushes against it, it forms a ball around the fish, from which the fish generally cannot escape. Since it eats fish, it is best kept in an aquarium that does not contain fish species and has a sandy bottom and rock formations. In the aquarium the Giant Cup Mushroom Coral can trap fish, but it can also be maintained and fed dead fish. Most fish learn to avoid it, but there is always a risk that it will trap and eat your favorite fish. In the wild this species lures, traps and eats fish, but it can be fed dead fish or other meaty foods in the aquarium environment. Care should be exercised with this species as it is possible that it may eat your favorite fish. Most fish learn to avoid it, but there is always a risk. If kept in a reef aquarium, it should be fed large meals of Artemia and other plankton-like foods. It will also receives some of its nutritional requirements from the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae hosted within its body.
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Bullseye Mushroom
(Rhodactis inchoata) Easy Semi-Aggressive Low Middle Low to Moderate Purple, Blue, Red, Green Calcium, Strontium, Trace Elements 72-78° F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4; dKH 8-12 South Pacific Discosomatidae Mushroom Corals The Rhodactis Bullseye Mushroom is also known as the Tonga Blue Mushroom and is less commonly referred to as a Hairy or Small Elephant Ear Mushroom. The Bullseye Mushroom usually is a violet to blue color, often with margins and highlights of green and may have a red mouth area, with papillae that form cauliflower-like patterns, and can grow up to 3 inches in diameter. This is a relatively easy species to care for and can thrive with lower lighting and waterflow. The Bullseye Mushroom makes a good coral for beginner reef aquarists in that it is relatively easy to care for and is a very attractive specimen. It is very easy to maintain the Bullseye Mushroom in the reef aquarium, mostly because it prefers low to medium lighting and low water movement. The Bullseye Mushroom is less tolerant of bright light compared to other Rhodactis sp., prefering reduced lighting, which normally requires that is be placed in the lower regions of the aquarium or where it is partially shaded. It is a semi-aggressive species and requires adequate space between itself and other corals so as not to damage any nearby neighbors. Longitudinal fission is the primary means of reproduction and it normally is sold as several individual mushrooms attached to one rock. The Bullseye Mushroom Coral receives most of its nutrition requirements through the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae hosted within its body through photosynthesis, which provide the majority of its nutrition. It may also eat plankton and small invertebrates which can be provided through supplemental liquid foods.
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Blue Mushroom Coral
(Actinodiscus sp.) Easy Low to Medium Bottom to Middle Medium Semi-aggressive Green, Blue, Emerald Calcium, Iodine, Strontium, Trace elements 72-80° F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Indo-Pacific, South Pacific Actinodiscidae Mushroom Corals Mushroom Corals The Blue Mushroom Coral (Actinodiscus sp.) is a hardy and easy to maintain species, which is also very colorful and enjoyable to keep. Blue Mushroom Corals are also referred to as Mushroom Anemones, Actinodiscus Mushroom and Disc Anemones. This variety of mushroom coral varies in color from a light blue/green to an emerald green depending on lighting and aquarium conditions. They will also fluoresce when kept under actinic lighting. Blue Mushroom Corals are a wonderful invertebrate for bottom placement in a reef aquarium, which over time will reproduce forming a carpet covering the rock work and nearby sand in a brilliant fluorescent green. In general, Blue Mushroom Corals will prosper with only a medium light intensity, and should be placed in the lower areas of an aquarium if kept under high intensity reef lighting. Blue Mushroom Corals require a low to moderate indirect water flow in which to provide supplementary food sources such as photo-plankton and carry away waste products created by the coral. Too direct or too intense a water flow will inhibit the Blue Mushroom Coral from fully expanding and will overtime lead to poor health. Optimum placement for this species is on the bottom of the aquarium in a spot with indirect water flow. Bottom placement will also keep the Blue Mushroom Coral from receiving too intense lighting; as well as, allow it to grow outward. When placing the Blue Mushroom Coral also keep in mind that it is a semi-aggressive species that will require adequate space between itself and other corals or sessile invertebrates (also note that this species will grow out horizontally over time). The Blue Mushroom Coral receives most of its nutritional requirements through the photosynthesis of the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae, which it hosts. However, it also feeds on other nutrients and particle matter present in established marine aquariums. The Blue Mushroom Coral will also benefit from additional feedings in the form of micro-plankton or other foods designed for filter feeding invertebrates. Each mushroom polyp in the colony is a distinct individual, thus supplemental foods should be gently sprayed over the entire colony to make sure that each polyp has an opportunity to feed.
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