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Doughnut Coral
(Cynarina lacrymalis) Easy Peaceful Low Bottom to Middle Moderate Brown, Green, Red, Pastels Calcium, Strontium, Trace Elements 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Indo-Pacific Mussidae LPS Hard Corals The Cynarina Button Coral is a large polyp stony (LPS) coral that is also commonly referred to as Cat's Eye, Tooth, Doughnut, Teary Eye, or Meat Coral. The Cynarina Button Coral resembles an artichoke in appearance, it is one of the largest single-polyped coral found in the wild. It's coloration can vary from different forms of bright vibrant pastels to more drab variations. The Cynarina Button Coral is non-aggressive in nature, but like most corals, requires adequate space in which to expand sweeper tentacles and such in order to feed. In the case of the Cynarina Button Coral a space large enough to allow the coral to expand to twice it's size is required. Compared to many corals available on the market this space consideration is very modest, which allows for a variety of placements for the Cynarina Button Coral within a reef aquarium. The combination of both its hardiness and its ease of placement make this coral an excellent choice for beginning reef aquarists, while its brilliant coloration and unique shape make it an interesting specimen for advanced reef aquarists as well. The Cynarina Button Coral only expands to about twice its normal size for feeding, which allows for diverse placement within any reef aquarium. The Cynarina Button Coral is a relatively easy specimen to maintain, which makes it an excellent choice for the beginning reef aquarist. It requires only medium lighting and low water movement, which allows for very diverse placement. Like most corals the Cynarina Button Coral will benefit from the addition of calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water. Supplemental feedings of brine shrimp or mico-plankton with the aquarium lights turned off will greatly benefit this species. Along with medium lighting and low water movement the Cynarina Button Coral requires supplemental feedings of micro-plankton, brine shrimp or similar meaty foods. Like most corals the Cynarina Button Coral will also benefit from the addition of calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water.
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Candy Cane Coral
(Caulastrea furcata) Easy Peaceful Medium All Moderate Blue-Green, Brown-Green, Yellow-Green Calcium, Strontium, Trace Elements 72-78º F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Indo-Pacific Faviidae LPS Hard Corals The Candy Cane Coral is a large polyp stony (LPS) coral often referred to as either Trumpet, Torch, Candy, or Bullseye Coral. Its genus name, Caulastrea, comes from the Latin kaulos (stalk), and aster (star) describing its skeletal structure consisting of tubular stalks with stars on each tip. The large circular polyps are vibrant green, yellow, blue and brown. The Candy Cane Coral from Fiji are generally a brilliant greenish/teal and brown, and the tips are white. With quality lighting such as metal halides or combination 10,000k & actinic blue power compacts, the Candy Cane Coral will stand out amongst the crowd with it's brilliant coloration. As corals go the Candy Cane coral is a hardy species when kept in an environment with moderate water movemoment and medium to strong lighting. The Candy Cane Coral requires moderate water movement and moderate to strong lighting in the aquarium environment. It makes a great addition to the reef aquarium with its' brilliant coloration and passive nature. Unlike many corals, the Candy Cane coral has very short sweeper tentacles, which allows it to be kept in close quarters with other corals without harming them. Due to its need for only moderate lighting combined with very short sweeper tentacles, the Candy Cane coral can live in many areas within a reef aquarium and do very well. The Candy Cane coral has short sweeper tentacles, which will necesitate the need to provide some supplemental nutrients through weekly feedings of either brine shrimp or micro-plankton. As with most other corals the Candy Cane coral will also benefit from the addition of calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water.
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Bubble Coral
(Plerogyra sp.) Easy Aggressive Low to Medium Bottom Moderate White, Yellow, Pink, Red Calcium, Strontium,Trace Elements 72-78° F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4; dKH 8-12 Indo-Pacific Caryophylliidae LPS Hard Corals Bubble Corals are both unique and attractive in their appearance. With both attractive colors and a unique bubble like appearance they provide a stark contrast to many other Indo-Pacific LPS corals. They have a white-ridged hard skeleton that can be seen only when the polyps are deflated. When inflated, the large skin like polyps will cover the entire coral skeleton, giving this species a white, yellowish or pink coloration. Like many other LPS corals, this species posses sweeper tentacles that can harm other near by corals, making it important to think about the position and placement in the aquarium. Bubble Corals require moderate lighting levels combined with low to moderate water flow to flourish in the home aquarium. Too much water flow will prevent the coral from fully expanding its fleshly polyps. These polyps are very fragile and will puncture easily, thus it is very important to handle these corals with the utmost care and only by the hard skeletal base. Because Bubble Corals have long sweeper tentacles, be sure to place them in a location that will provide plenty of room between themselves and other species to prevent damage being done to its neighbors. As with most corals the Bubble Coral will benefit from the addition of calcium, strontium and other trace elements added periodically to the water. Bubble Corals utilize the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae from which it receives the majority of its nutrition through photosynthesis. They also benefit from occasional feedings of meaty items; such as, brine shrimp or micro-plankton. They should be offered food when the tentacles are fully expanded, which is typically during the night time hours. As with most corals the Bubble Coral will benefit from the addition of calcium, strontium and other trace elements added periodically to the water.
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Pineapple Brain Coral
(Favites spp.) Easy Aggressive Medium Any Moderate Brown, Cream, Green, Orange, Yellow Calcium, Strontium, Trace Elements 72-78° F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4; dKH 8-12 Indo-Pacific Faviidae LPS Hard Corals The Favites Corals are large polyp stony (LPS) corals often referred to as Moon, Pineapple, Brain, Closed Brain, Star, Worm, or Honeycomb Coral. They are the most common and prolific coral in the world, and are very similar to the genus Favia, sharing many of the same common names, and sometimes being very difficult to differentiate. Favites Corals are found in various color forms and polyp shapes. "Pineapple Coral" is the name commonly given to those that have smaller circular patterns with a tan-ish brown outer ridges and vibrant green inner crevices. Favite Corals are aggressive, expanding their sweeper tentacles at night well beyond their base. It is important to leave space between them and neighbors in the reef aquarium, so that other corals are not stung by the sweeper tentacles. Maintenance for the Favite Corals (Pineapple Brain Coral) is relatively easy, making them excellent choices for both beginner and expert hobbyist. They require only moderate lighting combined with moderate water movement within the aquarium. While they do not require high intensity lighting, Pineapple Brain Corals should be given full spectrum lighting usually 6500K with Actinic Blue combination and they will also do fine with more intense lighting systems. Water movement should be moderate, they should not be subjected to any direct continuous current. To maintain Pineapple Brain Corals in good health, calcium, strontium, and other trace elements should be added to the water. They will also benefit from the addition of supplemental meaty foods in the form of micro-plankton or brine shrimp. They should be fed twice per week in the evening while the tentacles are visible.
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Closed Brain Coral
(Favites spp.) Easy Aggressive Medium Any Moderate Brown, Cream, Green, Orange, Yellow Calcium, Strontium, Trace Elements 72-78º F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Indo-Pacific Faviidae LPS Hard Corals Maintenance for the Closed Brain Corals (Favites Brain Coral) is relatively easy, making them excellent choices for both beginner and expert hobbyist. They require only moderate lighting combined with moderate water movement within the aquarium. While they do not require high intensity lighting, Pineapple Brain Corals should be given full spectrum lighting usually 6500K with Actinic Blue combination and they will also do fine with more intense lighting systems. Water movement should be moderate, they should not be subjected to any direct continuous current. To maintain Closed Brain Corals in good health, calcium, strontium, and other trace elements should be added to the water. They will also benefit from the addition of supplemental meaty foods in the form of micro-plankton or brine shrimp. They should be fed twice per week in the evening while the tentacles are visible. The Closed Brain Corals are large polyp stony (LPS) corals often referred to as Moon, Pineapple, Brain, Favites Brain, Star, Worm, or Honeycomb Coral. They are the most common and prolific coral in the world, and are very similar to the genus Favia, sharing many of the same common names, and sometimes being very difficult to differentiate. Closed Brain Corals are found in various color forms and polyp shapes. "Pineapple Coral" is the name commonly given to those that have smaller circular patterns with a tan-ish brown outer ridges and vibrant green inner crevices. Favite Corals are aggressive, expanding their sweeper tentacles at night well beyond their base. It is important to leave space between them and neighbors in the reef aquarium, so that other corals are not stung by the sweeper tentacles. Maintenance for the Closed Brain Corals (Favites Brain Coral) is relatively easy, making them excellent choices for both beginner and expert hobbyist. They require only moderate lighting combined with moderate water movement within the aquarium. While they do not require high intensity lighting, Pineapple Brain Corals should be given full spectrum lighting usually 6500K with Actinic Blue combination and they will also do fine with more intense lighting systems. Water movement should be moderate, they should not be subjected to any direct continuous current. To maintain Closed Brain Corals in good health, calcium, strontium, and other trace elements should be added to the water. They will also benefit from the addition of supplemental meaty foods in the form of micro-plankton or brine shrimp. They should be fed twice per week in the evening while the tentacles are visible.
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Black Tube Coral
(Tubastrea micrantha) Moderate Peaceful Medium to Strong Any Low Olive Green, Black Calcium, Strontium, Trace Elements 72-78° F; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4; dKH 8-12 Indo-Pacific Dendrophylliidae LPS Hard Corals The Black Tube Coral is a large polyp stony (LPS) coral, also commonly referred to as the Black Sun Coral. It is a very dark olive green to black colonial coral, markedly different than others within the species. It is often found on reef ledges or steep reef slopes in the wild, where it feeds on drifting zooplankton. Its skeleton has tubes branching in all directions. They should be placed into rockwork and prefer to be beneath a ledge where they will be shaded from high light. They are a low light species, but do require medium to strong water movement in order to feed on zooplankton that drifts by. Be careful when handling the Tube Coral; it can be fragile and needs to be picked up by its underside when placing it in the aquarium. Moderate to strong water current combined with low lighting levels will provide a good aquarium environment in which the Black Tube Coral can thrive. Usually, it will only expand its polyps in the evening unless it is hungry, when it may expand its polyps during the day. The tentacles have stinging cells that can shoot tiny poison darts into their prey or can even be used as a defense mechanism if necessary, but generally this species is peaceful with other if not overcrowded. While it is a hardy coral for the reef aquarium, it is classified as moderately difficult to maintain because it has special dietary needs. It is one of the few corals that does not contain the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae. Instead, it must be regularly fed vitamin-enriched brine shrimp or micro-plankton from an eyedropper directly to each of its polyps to promote rapid polyp budding. It will also benefit from the addition of calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water.
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