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Golden-spot Hogfish
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(Bodianus perditio) Moderate Semi-aggressive 26" 450 gallons 72-79° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Carnivore Indo-Pacific, Western Pacific Labridae Hogfish Fish Only Golden-spot Hogfish (Bodianus perditio) are widely distributed throughout the tropical oceans of the southern hemisphere. They can be found living around coral reefs and rocky outcrops from the eastern coast of Africa to the western coast of North & South America and most areas in between. Despite their large size of close to 30 inches long in the wild and about 26 inches in the aquarium environment, Golden-spot Hogfish stay close to the reef throughout their lives. They generally inhabit shallow reefs and lagoons as juveniles and as they grow move out to deeper reefs and rocky outcrops as adults. Golden-spot Hogfish stay close to the reef as their primary source of food is the benthic clams and mollusks found growing on the rocks throughout the reef. Coral reefs also give Golden-spot Hogfish cover from large open water predator fish who would see the Hogfish as a prey item. Golden-spot Hogfish are only suitable long term for hobbyists with very large aquariums that are supported by a strong filtration system. Large bodied fish like the Golden-spot Hogfish need a significant amount of space to swim about and due to their size put a heavy biological load on aquarium filtration systems. Being that the Golden-spot Hogfish feeds primarily on crustaceans and sessile invertebrates, they are not suitable for reef aquariums or mixed fish aquariums with invertebrate clean up crews and such. Golden-spot Hogfish are mostly found in larger fish only aquarium setups like tanks housing reef sharks or large aquariums found in restaurants, hotels and other larger aquarium installations. Beyond a large aquarium, hobbyists seeking to keep Golden-spot Hogfish will need to employ a powerful filtration system that has excellent mechanical and biological capabilities. Large bead filters or large sump based wet/dry systems combined with a very large protein skimmer will be required to maintain proper water quality. Once hobbyists begin keeping larger reef fish species like Hogfish, Groupers, Sharks, Rays, etc. it is generally recommended that they move away from filtration products designed for smaller ornamental aquariums and look more toward products designed for aquaculture. Filters, skimmers, sumps and tanks designed for the aquaculture industry have the capacity and flow rates needed to handle larger reef fish even when they reach their max size as adults. Suitable tank mates for Golden-spot Hogfish should mainly be limited to larger community reef fish and semi-aggressive reef predator fish like groupers and reef shark species. Golden-spot Hogfish spend most of their time in the wild solo, but do pair up during breeding. Given enough room they will tolerate others of their own kind, but in smaller environments they will become territorial towards others that they see as competition for food. Wild Golden-spot Hogfish feed primarily on crustaceans and benthic invertebrates such as mollusks and clams. Aquarium specimens will consume a wide variety of marine based meaty foods ranging from commercial pellets and frozen foods to homemade preparations. Being such a large fish, hobbyists will most likely find that it is more economical to feed them a homemade diet consisting of clams, mollusks, squid, chopped fish, shrimp, cockles and other similar marine based meaty items. Ideally they should be fed smaller meals multiple times per day, as this more closely resembles how they would feed in the wild. Monitor the overall girth of the fish to make sure that they are receiving enough food and adjust feeding frequency accordingly. It is also recommended to vary their food items to ensure that they are receiving a balanced diet of minerals and vitamins that they require to maintain a healthy immune system.
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Spanish Hogfish
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(Bodianus rufus) Easy Aggressive 10" 150 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Carnivore Caribbean Labridae Hogfish Predatory Spanish Hogfish are found along coral reefs throughout the Caribbean, where they inhabit relatively shallow water reefs looking for crustacean, invertebrate or small fish prey. They are a fairly large species of reef fish that typically reach upwards of 10" in length and have relatively stout build. As juveniles the Spanish Hogfish exhibits a peaceful demeanor towards other fish species and will even clean parasites from larger fish. However, as they mature Spanish Hogfish become quite aggressive towards smaller fish species and will actively bully fish species that are smaller than themselves. They are prized within the aquarium community by aquarists who prefer to keep FOWLR aquariums containing larger fish species. The Spanish Hogfish does well with other large fish species like triggers, groupers, etc. and it renowned for their resistance to disease and overall strong constitution. They have attractive coloration and are strong active swimmers that do well in larger aquariums with other large fish tank mates. Spanish Hogfish should not be kept in a reef aquarium or with smaller less aggressive fish species, invertebrate or crustaceans as they will be seen as food items. Spanish Hogfish are a very hardy tropical reef fish species that will do well in larger aquariums with strong filtration and good water movement. In the wild this species patrols the top and edges of shallow coral reefs, thus it is well adapted to strong water currents. Spanish Hogfish are strong swimmers that will appreciate adequate room in the aquarium in which to swim along with small to moderate amounts of live rock or similar aquarium decor along with medium to strong water currents. Adult specimens are aggressive and are only suitable for non-reef aquariums that contain other large aggressive fish species. Spanish Hogfish should not be kept with crustaceans, invertebrates or small fish unless they are intended as food items. They make a great community species in larger predatory aquariums where their active swimming style, bright coloration and strong aggressive personality make them an ideal tank mate for other fish species of similar dispositions. They require strong mechanical, biological and chemical filtration to cope with the large amounts of waste produced by larger fish species. The diet of the Spanish Hogfish varies quite a bit between a juvenile and adult specimen. Juvenile Spanish Hogfish eat a variety of small meaty foods including parasites off of other larger fish species, meaty flake, frozen or freeze-dried foods like brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, krill or similar marine meaty fare. Adult Spanish Hogfish are much more aggressive and will consume a large variety of meaty foods including live invertebrates and fish. Mature specimens will readily consume snails, shrimp, worms, mussels, smaller fish species and a wide range of crustaceans and sessile invertebrates.
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