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Bicolor Foxface
(Siganus uspi) Easy Peaceful 10" 125 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Herbivore Fiji, Western Pacific Siganidae Foxface-Rabbit Reef Compatible The Bicolor Foxface (Siganus uspi) has been a popular fish species amongst large reef aquarium hobbyists for a long time. Their coloration, unique shape and propensity for consuming large amounts of algae and other marine vegetation make them both an attractive and beneficial addition to the reef aquarium. In the wild they are found on the edges of coral reefs and rocky reef slopes that dot the western Pacific ocean. While generally considered a reef safe species, they may nibble on some soft & LPS corals if not sufficiently fed. Despite their relatively large size, they are active and graceful swimmers that do well swimming about crowded reef aquariums. Bicolor Foxface truly revel in swimming and algae grazing, thus really do require an aquarium with plenty of open swimming area and plenty of rocks on which to graze for algae. This species should only be added to well establish large reef or FOWLR aquariums that provide for plenty of algae grazing opportunities. If added to a newer aquarium or one with minimal rocky reef scape, the Bicolor Foxface should be provided frequent supplemental feedings of algae rich food and provided dried seaweed or green leafy vegetables like green leaf lettuce. Their larger size allows them to be kept with many of the less aggressive predatory fish species, while their graceful swimming and algae consumption make them suitable for reef and mixed reef aquariums as well. Keeping the Bicolored Foxface in the home aquarium is relatively straight forward and not too difficult. Their primary need is for an adequately sized aquarium of at least 6 feet in length and 125 gallons or more in volume. Bicolored Foxface are very active swimmers who need significant space to swim within the aquarium. Plenty of live rock within the aquarium is ideal as this will provide the Bicolored Foxface both with places to hide when threatened and with additional algae grazing feeding opportunities. The relatively large size of this species combined with their peaceful demeanor make them well suited to be housed with a wide variety of other fish species. They are generally too large for larger semi-aggressive fish to bother and due to their peaceful nature they will not bother smaller fish species. If insufficient food is available, the Bicolor Foxface may nibble on some soft corals and LPS; however, in general they can be kept with pretty much any coral, invertebrate or crustacean species found within the typical reef or FOWLR aquarium. Hobbyists of any experience level should have no problems keeping this species provided their aquarium is large enough, they maintain reasonable water parameters and feed plant and algae based foods. The Bicolor Foxface is a herbivore that require mainly plant and alge based foods in their diet. While they may consume some meaty foods, their diet should have a substantially higher proportion of plant matter, seaweed and algae in their diet compared to meaty food items. In the wild they will eat large quantities of marine plants like Caulerpa and other similar macro-algae. In the aquarium environment they are most often fed marine seaweed and frozen preparations designed for herbivores. They will also consume some meaty foods like mysis shrimp, brine shrimp and flake or frozen preparations designed for omnivores and herbivores. In addition to regular direct feedings, the Bicolored Foxface should be provided with grazing opportunities via a vegetable clip containing seaweed, green leaf lettuce, romaine lettuce or via algae growth on live rock. The Bicolor Foxface like all Rabbitfishes, has venomous spines on their dorsal, pectoral and anal fins. While not fatal to humans, their sting can be extremely painful. Most injuries to hobbyists occur when they attempt to handle the Rabbitfish without wearing gloves. Hobbyists should use plastic collection containers while wearing gloves if they need to catch or move Rabbitfish.
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Masked Rabbitfish
(Siganus puellus) Easy Peaceful 10" 150 gallons 74-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Herbivore Indian Ocean, Australia, South China Sea Siganidae Foxface-Rabbitfish Reef Compatible The Masked Rabbitfish (Siganus puellus) is found in it its native habitat living in shallow, coral-rich lagoons and seaward facing reefs of the Indo-West Pacific region, generally at depths of 10 to 100 feet. While they are found primarily in the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific, they can be found in the South China Sea to the Gilbert Islands, north to the Ryukyu Islands, south to the southern Great Barrier Reef and New Caledonia, and Tonga. Juvenile specimens form large schools, often mixing with other Rabbitfish and Tangs, where they patrol the open reef flats and in lagoons, especially in areas dominated by Acropora corals. However, as an adult they will form isolated pairs and move to deeper waters, typically along seaward facing reef slopes and drop-offs at reef edges. Their body is yellow-orange coloration with dorsal grading from a pale blue to white, with the body being covered with wavy blue lines that are vertical to the anterior and horizontal to the posterior. The eyes are masked by a prominent blackish stripe that extends from the bottom of the mouth to the top of the head, with gives them their common "Masked Rabbitfish" name. As this black stripe passes through the eye it becomes spotted with black dots over top a blue background. This species is sold under a variety of names within the aquarium hobby including: the Masked Rabbitfish, Decorated Rabbitfish, and Masked Spinefoot. Unlike some of the other Rabbitfish commonly sold in the hobby who do well in aquariums as small as 75 gallons, the Masked Rabbitfish is more of an open water species who will need a an aquarium of 150 gallons or more as an adult in order to thrive. When keeping the Masked Rabbitfish within the aquarium environment hobbyists will want to focus on providing plenty of live rock for grazing, ample swimming space and compatible tank mates. Similar to open water Tang species, the Masked Rabbitfish moves up and down large areas of seaward facing reef slopes in the wild grazing on algae over a large territory. They need a large enough aquarium to adequately simulate a scaled down version of their life in nature within an aquarium environment. Ideally hobbyists will want to keep them in an 8 foot long tank like a 240 gallon or larger; however, a 6 foot tank like a 180 or 150 gallon is sufficient on the low end. This is not the species to keep in smaller 4 reef tank as an adult, as with time they will become more and more aggressive towards tank mates and any polyp or stony corals that are present. Despite picking on corals when kept in aquariums that are too small and confining or when under fed, the Masked Rabbitfish is very much a reef compatible fish when properly fed and housed. It is quite flexible in regards to tank mates, with the only exception being other Rabbitfish or a group of their own kind. They do best when kept in a pair in larger reef aquariums. When kept in a suitably sized aquarium, this species will not bother smaller tank mates, and are large enough as an adult to handle being kept with larger aggressive community fish like large Angelfish or even predatory fish like Groupers or Triggerfish. Predators are aware of the venomous dorsal spines of their and will tend to leave them alone. Lastly, it should be said again that this species can eat large amounts of algae from rocks, like green hair algae and filamentous algae. Thus they need to be kept in tanks that provide plenty of grazing opportunities or provided supplemental feedings of dried algae or seaweed. It should also be noted that do not eat every type of algae, so those with nuisance algae problems will need to verify that the Masked Rabbitfish will eat the specific type of algae that is taking over the tank if purchased for the sole purpose of clearing up a algae plague. Masked Rabbitfish are a herbivore species who consume large amounts of marine algae, seaweed and some marine plants. They will do best in aquariums with plenty of live rock to provide them with algae grazing opportunities, in addition to a herbivore based commercial foods diet. Hobbyists will want to provide them a quality flake or frozen food designed for marine herbivores, along with plenty of dried algae or seaweed. In the wild they will eat large quantities of marine plants like Caulerpa and other similar macro-algae, thus they cannot be kept in aquariums containing most marine plant species. This species is sought after by many reef aquarium hobbyists as they are adept keeping the reef free of excess algae growth. However, if they are not able to satisfy their appetite with commercial herbivore foods and supplemental algae grazing, they will often nip at polyp and stony corals. If you witness this species nipping at corals it is best to provide them with additional dried seaweed or algae, which should curb any aggression towards corals. The Masked Rabbitfish like all Rabbitfishes has venomous spines on their dorsal, pectoral and anal fins. While not fatal to humans, their sting can be extremely painful. Most injuries to hobbyists occur when they attempt to handle the Rabbitfish without wearing gloves. Hobbyists should use plastic collection containers while wearing gloves if they need to catch or move Rabbitfish.
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Foxface Rabbitfish
(Siganus vulpinus) Easy Peaceful 9" 70 gallons 74-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Western Pacific Siganidae Foxface-Rabbit Reef Compatible The Foxface Rabbitfish (Siganus vulpinus) has been a popular fish species amongst reef aquarium hobbyists for a long time. Their coloration, unique shape and propensity for consuming algae and other marine vegetation make them both an attractive and beneficial addition to the reef aquarium. In the wild they are found throughout the coral reefs and rocky reef outcrops that dot the western Pacific ocean. While generally considered a reef safe species, the Foxface Rabbitfish may nibble on zoanthids or coral polyps if not properly fed. Despite their relatively large size, they are active and graceful swimmers that do well swimming about crowded reef aquariums. Hobbyists may still find this species sold under the now obsolete common name of Foxface Lo, which was based off of the previous categorization of the Foxface in the genus Lo. Foxface Rabbitfish make an excellent addition to a wide variety of aquariums including reef, FOWLR and semi-aggressive predator aquariums. Their larger size allows them to be kept with many of the less aggressive predatory fish species, while their graceful swimming and algae consumption make them suitable for reef and mixed reef aquariums as well. Keeping Foxface Rabbitfish in the home aquarium is relatively straight forward and not too difficult. Primarily they need an adequately sized aquarium approximately 4 feet in length and 70 gallons or more in volume. Foxface Rabbitfish are tolerant of less than perfect water parameters, but do need stable water temperature and chemistry. Plenty of live rock within the aquarium is ideal as this will provide the Foxface Rabbitfish both with places to hide when threatened and with additional feeding opportunities. The relatively large size of the Foxface combined with their peaceful demeanor make them well suited to be housed with a wide variety of other fish species. They are generally too large for larger semi-aggressive fish to bother and due to their peaceful nature they will not bother smaller fish species. Foxface Rabbitfish can also be kept with pretty much any coral, invertebrate or crustacean species found in the average reef or FOWLR aquarium. Hobbyists of any experience level should have no problems keeping this species provided their aquarium is large enough, they maintain reasonable water parameters and feed their fish quality fish foods. Foxface Rabbitfish are omnivores that require both plant and animal based foods in their diet. However, they require a much higher proportion of plant matter, seaweed and algae in their diet compared to meaty food items. In the wild they will eat large quantities of marine plants like Caulerpa and other similar macro-algae. In the aquarium environment they are most often fed marine seaweed and frozen preparations designed for herbivores. They will also consume meaty foods like mysis shrimp, brine shrimp and flake or frozen preparations designed for omnivores and herbivores. In addition to regular direct feedings, Foxface Rabbitfish should be provided with grazing opportunities via a vegetable clip containing seaweed, green leaf lettuce, romaine lettuce or via growth on live rock. Foxface Rabbitfish like all Rabbitfishes have venomous spines on their dorsal, pectoral and anal fins. While not fatal to humans, their sting can be extremely painful. Most injuries to hobbyists occur when they attempt to handle the Rabbitfish without wearing gloves. Hobbyists should use plastic collection containers while wearing gloves if they need to catch or move Rabbitfish.
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Yellow Blotch Rabbitfish
(Siganus guttatus) Moderate Peaceful 16" 180 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Herbivore Indo-Pacific, Tropical Central Pacific Siganidae Foxface-Rabbit Reef Compatible Yellow Blotch Rabbitfish are a large, active and attractive species found throughout the tropical waters of the Pacific Ocean. Yellow Blotch Rabbitfish are also commonly referred to as the Orange-Spotted Spinefoot; both names are well earned and the former is based on the yellow false eye they have on their caudal section while the latter is due to the fact they they have orange, spot-like markings as well as a venomous dorsal spine that they often raise in defense. Yellow Blotch Rabbitfish are extremely peaceful towards other fish species, but can become aggressive with other Rabbitfish in an aquarium environment and should be kept singly or as a pair. Yellow Blotch Rabbitfish can be reef compatible if they are well fed; otherwise they may nip at stony and soft coral species. Although they are becoming more popular in the hobby Yellow Blotch Rabbitfish are not always available, but they can occasionally be special ordered locally or found through online vendors. Yellow Blotch Rabbitfish are large and robust species that should be housed in an aquarium of at least 180 gallons (a pair should be housed in 240 gallons or more) and be provided with a sand substrate in addition to large amounts of live rock for algae grazing and overall system balance. They prefer plenty of open swimming space as well as quality water conditions; strong biological and mechanical filtration is recommended with the addition of a quality protein skimmer. Yellow Blotch Rabbitfish are naturally peaceful and aren't usually bothered as they have their venomous dorsal spines; they can coexist peacefully with many other fish species aside from other conspecifics that they aren't paired with. They are considered to be reef safe (as long as they are provided with plenty of marine algae to keep them from nipping at stony and soft corals) and would do well in a community reef or FOWLR environment. Yellow Blotch Rabbitfish are herbivores and eat copious marine algae within their natural habitat. In the aquarium their diet should consist of a variety of high quality, vitamin enriched, marine algae preparations, and quality Spirulina-based flake foods for herbivores. They will also graze on filamentous algae within the aquarium, but should also be fed once or twice a day.
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