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Matted Filefish
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(Acreichthys tomentosus) Moderate Peaceful 4" 30 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Indo-West Pacific Monacanthidae Filefish Fish Only The Matted Filefish, often referred to as the Bristletail Filefish, is an attractive species that is well known for its ability to eliminate Aiptasia and Majano anemones. Matted Filefish also have the ability to camouflage themselves by shifting their mottled coloration, effectively blending into the rock rubble, seagrass, and shallow coral reefs throughout their Indo-West Pacific habitat. Matted Filefish are a gentle and peaceful species that generally prefers to investigate their aquarium while always on the lookout for snacks. Matted Filefish are quite popular in the hobby and are commonly available through online retailers; local vendors should be able to place a special order if they aren't in stock. Matted Filefish require an aquarium of at least 30 gallons and require a sand to crushed-coral substrate in addition to plenty of live rock for grazing and shelter. Although they have proven to be a hardy species, they appreciate an established aquarium with stable water conditions as well as high quality, biological and mechanical filtration (including a protein skimmer). They will coexist peacefully with many other tank mates, but should not be housed with aggressive fish that may harass them or pick at the bristle-like spinules of maturing males. Although Matted Filefish will decimate and likely eradicate infestations of nuisance anemones, they have been known to nip at some coral polyps (e.g.; zoanthids and palythoas) and sessile invertebrates; they are also known to consume small crustaceans (including ornamental shrimp), bivalve mollusks, and polychaetes. They aren't considered to be reef friendly and would ideally be housed in a peaceful, community FOWLR system. Matted Filefish are omnivores that mainly feed upon amphipods, bivalve mollusks, copepods, isopods, polychaetes, and various marine algae within their natural habitat. In an aquarium environment, they should be fed a variety of meaty food items such as live, frozen, freeze-dried, prepared, and vitamin enriched brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, krill, squid, crab meat, clams, scallops, and marine algae. Feed multiple small meals (at least thrice) per day. Matted Filefish are dimorphic egg-layers that have been reported to readily breed in an aquarium environment. A pair can generally be formed by simply introducing a male and female to an aquarium at the same time (the male can be identified by the presence bristle-like spinules); mature males will display retrorse spinules at roughly 2-3" and females will have developed eggs at 3". The Female will eventually lay around 300 adhesive eggs in a sheltered location on the substrate, which she will defend until they hatch a few day later. New fry can be fed a diet of Artemia nauplii and euryhaline rotifers for the first two weeks, after which they can be moved to mature Artemia Salina and juvenile-sized foods.
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Orangespotted Filefish
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(Oxymonacanthus longirostris) Expert Peaceful 5" 30 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Carnivore Indo-Pacific Monacanthidae Filefish Fish Only The Orangespotted Filefish, commonly called the Harlequin Filefish by hobbyists, is possibly the most beautiful filefish species within the hobby. Orangespotted Filefish are commonly found in pairs and small groups among lagoons and tropical coral reefs throughout the Indo-Pacific. Orangespotted Filefish have a blue-green base coloration with a multitude of yellow-orange spots and blotches over the entire body that solidly colors the forward dorsal "trigger" in a line to the upper snout. Orangespotted Filefish commonly have green eyes rimmed in yellow-orange with light, blue-green radial striping; they also have a dark ventral "trigger" area with a smattering of tiny, white to light blue-green spots and a black blotch on the caudal fin. Orangespotted Filefish are magnificent species that is becoming extremely popular as hobbyists continue to learn more about the species; their availability is sparse, but their numbers are gradually increasing within the trade; they can mainly be found through online retailers and some local vendors may have a source where special orders can be placed. Orangespotted Filefish require an aquarium of at least 30 gallons and should be provided with a sand to crushed-coral substrate in addition to plenty of live rock for refuge. They appreciate an established aquarium with stable water conditions as well as high quality, biological and mechanical filtration (including a protein skimmer). They will coexist peacefully with many other tank mates, but should not be housed with aggressive fish that may harass them (especially while acclimating to their new environment and being weaned off an exclusive diet of SPS coral polyps). Orangespotted Filefish are known to be obligatory corallivores of SPS corals in the wild and are not recommended for reef systems for this very reason, although they will initially require the presence of SPS corals until they learn to accept other food items; they should not be considered safe around small invertebrates such as tiny ornamental shrimp species. This species is ideal for a "nano" environment as well as a larger system and have been reported to thrive in large SPS reef tanks without noticeable damage. Orangespotted Filefish were initially believed to be obligatory corallivores (a strict diet of only coral) and was previously known to only consume Acropora and Montipora coral species; although several hobbyists have observed them consuming hair algae, frozen brine shrimp and frozen mysis shrimp (both vitamin-enriched). This species should always be introduced into an established aquarium that already contains Acropora or Montipora coral colonies where they will have their natural food source while the hobbyist attempts to slowly wean them towards live ("gut-load" with a variety of different, quality flake and prepared foods), frozen, and vitamin-enriched meaty foods such as brine shrimp and mysis shrimp. They may also eventually accept other prepared foods for omnivores, such as quality flakes and pellets. Once completely weaned from SPS corals, feed them multiple small meals a day to insure they are getting enough to eat.
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Tassle Filefish
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(Chaetodermis penicilligerus) Easy Peaceful 12" 75 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Monacanthidae Filefish Fish Only The Tassle Filefish, sometimes referred to as the Leafy Filefish, is an interesting and unique relative of the Triggerfish species. Endemic to the reefs of the Indo-Pacific, the Tassle Filefish gets its name from the multiple, tiny tassle-like protuberances over its entire body; which in conjunction with their broken, horizontal striping, they have an efficient natural camouflage an can blend into the surrounding marine algae among the reef of their natural habitat while they search for food or hide from danger. Tassle Filefish are an active and peaceful species that like to swim around the entire aquarium in search of food and other interesting things. They should not be housed with aggressive tank mates that will pick at their protuberances, such as puffers or triggers. Tassle Filefish require an aquarium of at least 75 gallons and should be provided with plenty of live rock for shelter as well as a fine sand to crushed coral substrate. They are heavy eaters and should be provided with efficient protein skimming in addition to high quality, biological and mechanical filtration. They will coexist peacefully with other tank mates that are not conspecific or similar in appearance and aggressive tank mates that will harass them or pick at their "tassles" should be avoided (puffers and triggers). Tassle Filfish won't usually harm corals, but will eat invertebrates (including anemones); they aren’t reef safe and would ideally be housed in a peaceful, community oriented FOWLR system. Tassle Filefish are omnivores and are often found in weedy areas where they blend into their surroundings while they hunt for small fish, shrimp, and other invertebrates in addition to marine algae. They should be fed a variety of meaty food items such as live, frozen, freeze-dried, and vitamin enriched brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, krill, squid, crab meat, clams, and other prepared meaty food as well as marine algae. Feed 3 times per day.
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Orange Fantail Filefish
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(Pervagor spilosoma) Easy Peaceful 4" 45 gallons 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Eastern Pacific Monacanthidae Filefish Fish Only The Orange Fantail Filefish is found in coral reefs around the Hawaiin Islands and is considered a hardy fish species that is well suited for fish only marine aquariums. It is also commonly known as the Hawaiian Filefish, Fantail Filefish, or Fantail Orange Filefish Hawaii within the marine aquarium hobby. While this species is one of the smaller filefish species (about 4 inches) it is not suitable for reef aquariums or those with invertebrates, as it will eat many types of invertebrates. However, with the exception of others of its own kind and fish species with very long finnage, the Orange Fantail Filefish can be kept with most other marine fish species without problems. This species is brown and silver with an orange, black and yellow tail fin. It is a very flat shaped fish species with a distinctive body shape and vibrant coloration. The Orange Fantail Filefish is rarely aggressive toward other fish species, with the exception of species from its own genus. It will also pick at the fins of fish species with very long elaborate finnage. This species is best suited for a 55 gallon or larger aquarium with plenty of live rock, but that does not contain invertebrates. The Orange Fantail Filefish will feed on a variety of sessile invertebrates and therefore is not suitable for the majority of reef aquariums. The Orange Fantail Filefish is one of the more desirable Filefish species for the home aquarium as it is very hardy, has distinctive coloration and stays relatively small. The diet of the Orange Fantail Filefish should include a variety of shrimp, squid, scallop pieces along with mysid shrimp, freeze-dried krill soaked in a vitamin supplement, and frozen marine algae. Filefish in general need to be fed a mixed diet of foods 3 to 4 times per day. It is important to keep in mind that this species is a true omnivore and must be fed a varied diet that includes fresh or frozen herbivore preparations and meaty foods.
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