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Fiji Barberi Clownfish
(Amphiprion barberi) Easy Semi-aggressive 4" 30 gallons 72-82° F, KH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4 sg 1.020-1.026 Omnivore Fiji Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible Fiji Barberi Clownfish are not surprisingly found in the coral reefs and tidal reefs of Fiji. They are a color variant of the (Amphiprion melanopus) clownfish, which is found in many locations within the Australian South Pacific to the Western Pacific Ocean. Since their fairly recent discovery, the Fiji Barberi Clownfish has become a very popular aquarium species due to it's vibrant reddish orange coloration and bright orange face and finnage. While suitable for beginning marine aquarium hobbyists, the Fiji Barberi Clownfish is also sought after by advanced hobbyists for it's beautiful coloration and suitability for both FOWLR or reef aquariums. The Fiji Barberi Clownfish is a very flexible species that can easily find it's own niche in either a FOWRL or reef aquarium. They are aggressive enough to not be bullied by larger aggressive species, but are not so aggressive that they cannot co-exist with smaller or less aggressive fish species. Fiji Barberi Clownfish will also do well in a reef environment as they will not damage corals or harass most peaceful reef species given adequate space. However, it is not recommended for smaller nano-cube environments where their somewhat boisterous behavior could cause stress to smaller more peaceful reef species in such a small enclosure. Ideal aquarium setups for this species should contain plenty of rock work and caves in order to provide a natural environment. They will appreciate having caves and crevices to retreat to if they feel threatened. Plenty of live rock will also allow the Fiji Barberi Clownfish to establish a small territory as his own, which will limit his aggression towards other non-similar tank mates. It is best to house Clownfish either as a single specimen, mated pair or small group of 5 or 6 individuals. Fiji Barberi Clownfish do not require the presence of a host anemone, but will greatly appreciate the presence of larger anemones like Entacmaea quadricolor, carpet anemones or larger bubble tip species. They will generally establish a symbiotic relationship with any suitable host anemone present in the aquarium. Fiji Barberi Clownfish should be fed a varied diet that consists of both plant based and meaty foods. They will readily consume a variety of food types including: flake, small pellet, freeze-dried, frozen and live foods. A mixture of quality foods like formula I & II, Mysis Shrimp, enriched Brine Shrimp, Cyclop-eeze and similar foodstuffs will ensure that the Fiji Barberi Clownfish has a varied nutritional intake that will help them maintain a proper immune system.
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Tomato Clownfish
(Amphiprion frenatus) Easy Semi-Aggressive 5" 30 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible Tomato Clownfish have a wide distribution that extends throughout the Indo-Pacific region. They prefer to host almost exclusively in Bubbletip Anemones (Entacmaea quadricolor), but can be found hosting in Heteractis crispa and on occasion using a coral as a host. Within the aquarium hobby, the Tomato Clownfish is sometimes also referred to as the Red Clownfish, Fire Clownfish or Red Fire Clownfish. Tomato Clownfish are an excellent choice for beginning marine aquarium hobbyists as they are very hardy and tolerant of the types of mistakes beginning hobbyists make in regards to water quality. They also do well in fish-only aquariums that house other semi-aggressive fish species like some Triggers and Angelfish, as the Tomato Clownfish can hold their own against larger species. Tomato Clownfish are fairly aggressive (especially towards other Clownfish) and will vigorously protect their territory, which is typically their host anemone or rocky cave if no host is available. Due to their somewhat aggressive nature, Tomato Clownfish are not recommended for smaller nano aquariums or reef aquariums that house more delicate species. The Tomato Clownfish is well suited for beginners through expert marine aquarium hobbyists as they do well in a variety of fish-only, FOWLR and larger reef aquariums. It is recommended that they be kept in at least a 30 gallon aquarium, as they are a bit too aggressive for a smaller aquarium and will likely claim the entire aquarium for themselves. However, when kept in a 30 gallon or larger, especially if given an anemone to host in, they can coexist with a wide variety of fish and invertebrate species. In smaller to medium sized aquariums (30 to 90 gallons) Tomato Clownfish should be kept as the only Clownfish either singularly or a mated pair. In larger aquariums of 125 gallons or more, they can be kept with other Clownfish species if the tank is aqua-scaped to provide enough territory and if multiple host anemones are present. Tomato Clownfish are very aggressive feeders that will readily consume a wide variety of both meaty and vegetable foodstuffs. It is not uncommon for Tomato Clownfish to make it difficult for other more timid fish to feed as they will vigorously go after food during feedings. They should be fed a mix of meaty, vegetable and algae based commercial foods in order to provide them a balanced diet that provides them a range of vitamins, minerals and nutrients. All quality commercial foods including: flake, frozen, freeze-dried and live foods will be readily accepted.
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Sebae Clownfish
(Amphiprion sebae) Easy Semi-Aggressive 6" 30 gallons 72-78° F; dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible The Sebae Clownfish has traditionally been one of the most recognized anemonefish within the aquarium hobby for decades. Thus the Sebae Clownfish has been readily available within the hobby since tropical marine fish were first imported for the trade and more recently the Sebae Clown has been successfully bred in multiple captive breeding programs geared toward the marine aquarium hobby. Sebae Clownfish have many visual similarities to the Clarkii Clownfish, and are often mislabeled as Clarkii Clownfish and vice versa. The Sebae Clownfish has a brown body that darkens with age, two wide white stripes, an orange head and an anal fin that is white to yellow in color. Tank raised Sebae Clownfish are very hardy and will do well in a variety of marine aquarium setups, making them suitable for beginning marine aquarists and more advanced aquarists alike. Sebae Clownfish that are not tank bred are collected from the Indo-Pacific where they are found living among coral reefs and rocky outcrops in shallow to medium depth waters. Sebae Clownfish do very well in aquariums of 30 gallons or larger with or without the presence of an anemone. Ideally they should be provided with live rock to provide the territory and shelter when they feel threatened. Also, while the presence of an anemone is not mandatory, they are appreciated and will help the Sebae Clown feel more at home within the aquarium environment. Sebae Clowns are one of the larger and more territorial clownfish species, thus they should be kept as the only clown in smaller aquariums or in a mated pair or small group in larger aquariums. When kept in a group, the Sebae Clownfish will establish a hierarchy where the largest specimen will become the female, second largest the dominant male and the rest of the group will remain juveniles. The process of establishing their group hierarchy can be stressful on all the fish involved, so it is recommended to keep a pair of one large specimen and one small specimen, so they will have the best chance to pair off with little to no aggression. When pairing up the Sebae Clown with a host anemone, the following anemones are the most compatible: Sebae anemone, Long Tentacle anemone, Ritteri (Maroon) anemone, Carpet anemone, Saddle anemone, Bubble anemone. The Sebae Clown is probably one of the easiest captive marine fish species to feed, as they will eat a large variety of meaty or vegetable based foodstuffs including all the commonly available flake, frozen and freeze-dried preparations commonly available within the hobby. The Sebae Clownfish should be fed a diet that includes a variety of meaty food items such as brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, marine flake, chopped marine foods and carnivore or herbivore frozen preparations.
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McCullochs Clownfish
(Amphiprion mccullochi) Moderate Semi-aggressive 5" 40 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Lord Howe Island, Australia Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible McCulloch's Clownfish (Amphiprion mccullochi) is a new comer to the marine aquarium hobby, as it has only been since 2006 that specimens were collected from the wild and a breeding program started. McCulloch's Clownfish have been successfully bred in captivity and are thus becoming more common within the aquarium trade, but still command a price much higher than more common Clownfish species. However, given time this attractive and interesting species of Clownfish should become more affordable and accessible to the average marine aquarium hobbyist. Beyond the fact that this species is very difficult to acquire and thus very expensive, the McCulloch's Clownfish has unique physical features that include bluish-gray nose and mouth area with a jet black body with bright white markings and caudal fin. This species is only found in one known location, a small pacific ocean island off the coast of Australia called Lord Howe Island. This island is a certified World Heritage site, thus collecting of this species is very limited and the specimens available within the hobby have come from captive breeding programs. McCulloch's Clownfish adapt very well to aquarium life, as in the wild they are generally found in shallow lagoons and rocky reef outcrops of between 10 and 100 feet in depth. If provided with high quality stable water conditions and a sub-tropical water temperature of around 78 degrees, the McCulloch's Clownfish should both adapt quickly and thrive within the aquarium environment. Like all Clownfish species they will benefit from plenty of live rock with many caves and crevices to explore and to use for protection when threatened. While not absolutely necessary, the McCulloch's Clownfish will benefit from the presence of a suitable host anemone. They will generally take to a variety of Bulb Tip Anemones (Entacmaea quadricolor) or Sebae Anemones (Heteractis crispa). Once they have selected a host anemone they become extremely territorial over it and will defend their territory ruthlessly. This species should be kept singularly, in a mated pair or in a very large aquarium with many other Clownfish specimens, so that they do not single out an individual to harass. They do well with other fish species and do not harm corals or other invertebrates commonly found in marine reef aquariums. It is important to offer a varied diet of meaty fare in the form of vitamin and amino acid-enriched frozen mysis, frozen brine shrimp, flake food, and high quality pellet foods. A varied diet helps guarantee that all needed nutrients are provided and that the McCulloch's Clownfish is able to maintain a healthy immune system. Like most reef fish species, the McCulloch's Clown will appreciate feedings with a variety of offerings 2 to 3 times per day.
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Yellowstripe Maroon Clownfish
(Premnas biaculeatus) Easy Aggressive 6" 30 gallons 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Eastern Indian Ocean to Western Pacific Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible The Yellowstripe Maroon Clownfish or as it is also commonly referred to as the Spine-Cheeked Anemonefish or Maroon Anemonefish is hardy clownfish species that is attractive and readily available within the marine aquarium hobby. This species originates from the Indo-West Pacific: Indo-Australian Arch. including India, Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, New Guinea, New Britain, Solomon Is., Vanuatu, and Australia. It is a very hardy species that has adapted well to aquarium life and is often bred in captivity, thus many species available in the hobby are captive bred specimens. Yellowstripe Maroon Clownfish are more aggressive than most other clownfish species, especially towards others of the species or similar sized fish. Maroon Clowns are suitable for fish-only community, more aggressive fish only tanks and some reef aquariums. Yellowstripe Maroon Clownfish are generally maroon in color; however, their coloration can vary from maroon to red to even and orangish-red color. They have 3 relatively wide white stripes, one near the head, one in the middle of the body and one right before the tail fin. The fins of the Maroon Clown are round in shape and flow seamlessly off of the body. This species also has a spine that emanates from both cheeks, thus they are often referred to as Spine-cheek Clownfish as well. Yellowstripe Maroon Clownfish typically reach about 6 inches in length and can be comfortably housed in aquariums 30 gallon or larger. They originate from tropical coral reefs, thus will require live rock or other aqua-scaping to provide them with adequate caves and crevices to retreat to when they feel threatened. Maroon Clowns are more aggressive than most other Clownfish species and should not be kept with other Clownfish or similarly sized fish unless in a very large aquarium. This species will do well as a mated pair or as a single specimen in either community, aggressive or reef aquariums. Yellowstripe Maroon Clownfish enjoy symbiotic relationships with anemones, such as, Bubble Tip anemones (Entacmaea quadricolor), while it is not required to have an anemone with the Maroon Clown it is desirable and will provide the Maroon Clown with a more natural environment. It is important not to net this species when moving them as their cheek spines will become tangled in netting and can cause damage to the fish. Yellowstripe Maroon Clownfish are omnivores and will require a mixed diet of meaty foods and marine algae or herbivore preparations. Maroon Clowns are hardy eaters and will readily consume live mysid or brine shrimp, finely chopped fresh meaty foods, frozen preparations and flaked foods. They may also pick at algae or other items growing on live rock within the aquarium.
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Saddleback Clownfish
(Amphiprion polymnus) Easy Semi-Aggressive 4" 30 gallons 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible The Saddleback Clownfish is a popular fish species with beginners through reef aquarists alike due to their interesting appearance and relatively hardy disposition. Saddleback Clownfish can be found from the western pacific, China, Vietnam, Taiwan, south to Indonesia, Philippines, Australia, west to New Guinea and the Soloman Islands. This species is similar in temperament to Sebae or Clarkii Clownfish, and do best in small groups or mated pairs. Tank bred specimens tend to adapt to aquarium life better than wild caught specimens, but both are considered relatively easy to care for by intermediate to advanced aquarists. Saddleback Clownfish tend to be a little less aggressive and territorial than many other Clownfish species, thus tend to do well in the reef aquarium environment (especially when provided a suitable host anemone). Saddleback Clownfish have a dark brown to almost black body with a wide white stripe behind the eye, another on the middle of the back, which slants backwards slightly (giving the appearance of a white saddle). The caudal fin is mainly the same dark brown color as the body, usually with white areas on the top and bottom of the fin. The body is largest just behind the head area and tapers down as it reaches the tail fin. Saddleback Clownfish make excellent additions to both peaceful community aquariums and reef aquariums. While the minimum requirement for this species is a 30 gallon aquarium, they do best in 30 gallon or larger aquariums with live sand and plenty of live rock. In the wild this species generally lives in shallow sandy lagoons with scattered rocks along a sandy bottom or in lower regions of shallow reefs. Providing plenty of live rock in the aquarium envrionment will help create territory for the Saddleback Clownfish and reduce its aggression towards similarly sized fish in the aquarium. Providing a host anemone () will also lessen any aggression towards other fish in the aquarium and along with caves and crevices in the live rock will provide the Saddleback Clown with a place to retreat to when feeling threatened or when sleeping. This species also makes a great addition to most reef aquariums, as they will not harm corals or invertebrates, and are quite content to hang near their host anemone. Saddleback Clownfish are also successfully captive bred, and have even been known to breed in larger well maintained aquariums. Saddleback Clownfish are omnivores and will require a diet that contains a variety of meaty and vegetable items, along with marine algae. They will consume flake, freeze-dried and frozen meaty preparations along with live feeder shrimps etc. They should also be offered flake or frozen preparations with plenty of vegetable matter, such as, marine angelfish preparations containing vegetable matter and marine algae. Ideally live rock should be provided to allow for algae grazing opportunities and to provide habitat for other food sources like amphipods, copepods, etc. Overall, this species is a bold feeder and should readily accept most food items offered to it.
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Pink Skunk Clownfish
(Amphiprion perideraion) Moderate Semi-Aggressive 4" 30 gallons 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible The Pink Anemonefish is pinkish-orange with a white bar down either side of the face, and a white stripe along the back and a white caudal fin. Another contrasting white stripe is located just behind the eyes. It is semi-aggressive towards other similar species and may be intimidated by large boisterous tank mates. It is recommended to keep this species in a 30 gallon or larger aquarium with many hiding places including coral caves and rubble. An Anemone host such as Stichodactyla mertensii, Macrodactyla doreensis, or Heteractis crispa is preferred to provide the clownfish with an environment as close to the wild as possible. The Pink Anemonefish inhabits coral reefs and is usually associated with the anemone Heteractis magnifica. It is sometimes seen associated with three other anemones: Heteractis crispa, Mactodactyls doreenis and Stichodactyla gigantea. Usually one adult pair and several juveniles are present in each anemone. This fish occurs in tropical marine waters of the Western Central Pacific, from the Philippine Islands, north to Japan, throughout Micronesia, south to Australia and east to the Samoan Islands. In their natural environment their diet will consist of zooplankton, copepods, amphipods, benthic worms tunicates and various forms of algae. Within the aquarium environment they should be fed a diet consisting of high quality flake, pellet or frozen meaty food items, herbivore preparations and dried seaweed, along with marine based meaty items like chopped shrimp, mussel, clam, etc. This species has been known to breed within the aquarium environment with or without the presence of a compatible anemone; however, they do require a suitable area within the aquarium to lay their eggs. They prefer a protected area in the substrate or properly positioned rocky ledge. Pink Skunk Clownfish are a sequential hermaphrodite with a strict sized based dominance hierarchy: where the female will be the largest, the breeding male is second largest, and the non-sexually mature males will get progressively smaller as the hierarchy descends. They exhibit protandry, which means the breeding male will change to the female if the sole breeding female dies, then the largest non-sexually mature male will become the breeding male.
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Orange Skunk Clownfish
(Amphiprion sandaracinos) Moderate Semi-Aggressive 4" 30 gallons 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Western-Pacific Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible The Orange Skunk Clownfish, also known as the Skunk-striped Anemonefish, is pale orange with one white stripe behind the head that runs down the entire length of the back. Unlike A. perideraion, the Orange Skunk Clownfish and the similar Amphiprion akallopisos species has no vertical white headband present; has a somewhat bold white stripe that runs from the snout upwards between the eyes, continuing along both sides of the dorsal fin, ending at the upper part of the tail fin. Orange Skunk Clownfish are very hardy and durable fish making them a perfect addition for the novice or seasoned aquarist. If introduced to the aquarium at the same time, many varieties of tank raised clowns can be maintained together in the aquarium. The Orange Skunk Clownfish are semi-aggressive towards conspecifics and may be intimidated by boisterous tank mates. They form shoals in the home aquarium with the two dominant fish becoming a pair. The largest Clown is typically the terminal female, the next largest the male, and the others remain juveniles. The Orange Skunk Clownfish does well if kept in pairs with a host anemone. Large females can be rather aggressive towards closely related, as well as similar species. These fishes are unusual for wild as specimens are found to be prone to Brooklynellosis, or what is referred to as Clownfish Disease. Orange Skunk Clownfish are an omnivorous species whose diet should consist of a variety of meaty food items such as chopped shrimp and frozen herbivore preparations. A high quality, vitamin-enriched, color-enhancing marine omnivore flake food can be given to supplement adequate levels of nutrients. The Orange Skunk Clownfish can breed in an aquarium with or without an anemone host. A 30 gallon or larger aquarium with many hiding places is desirable. An anemone host such as Stichodactyla mertensii or Heteractis crispa is preferred, but not required as these fishes may adapt to other anemones nearby. These are well suited for reef tank aquariums but plenty of shelter to be provided.
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Clarkii Clownfish
(Amphiprion clarkii) Easy Semi-Aggressive 6" 30 gallons 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Persian Gulf, Western Australia, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible Clarkii Clownfish or Clark's Anemonefish are found widely distributed across the South Pacific and Indian Oceans all the way to the Persian Gulf in the east to Micronesia in the west and as far north as southern Japan. The wide availability, striking coloration and overall aquarium suitability have made this species a long time favorite within the aquarium hobby trade. As with many Clownfish species the Clarkii Clownfish should not be kept with other Clownfish species unless within a very large aquarium with suitable territory to support multiple species (220 gallon and up with plenty of live rock). Clarkii Anemonefish are omnivorous, and in the aquarium will readily eat brine shrimp, meaty marine flake foods, meaty frozen foods, mysis shrimp, herbivore flake or frozen foods and other similar marine based algae, seaweed or meaty items. They will regularly host in many sea anemones in the home aquarium and will bring food to their host anemone during feeding. Breeding Clarkii Clownfish in captivity is definitely a possibility, as they will utilize substrate, rocks ledges or rocky caves to lay their eggs. Unlike some Clownfish species, they do not require an anemone to breed and like all members of the Amphiprion genus, Clarkiis are highly sexually dimorphic.
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Cinnamon Clownfish
(Amphiprion melanopus) Easy Semi-Aggressive 5" 30 gallons 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Indonesia, Melanesia, Great Barrier Reef. Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible The Cinnamon Clownfish, which is also commonly referred to as the Black Anemonefish, Red and Black Anemonefish, or the Red and Black Clownfish within the aquarium trade, is a very fish species that is popular with beginners to advanced aquarists alike. This is one of the larger clownfish species found in the western pacific, reaching an adult size of around 5 to 6 inches. It is ideal to keep this species in an aquarium with live rock and a host anemone, as this will provide a small territory for it to call home and help reduce its aggression towards other tank mates. If kept in small sparsely aquascaped aquariums, this species tends to become territorial over the entire tank and will chase smaller less aggressive species. When kept in heavily aquascaped, reef or large aquariums the Cinnamon Clown can be kept easily with a variety of other fish and invertebrate species. Cinnamon Clownfish have an orange body that fades to a black color on the body and lighter orange to yellow finnage. They have a white stripe outlined in black that is located behind the eye and just before the pectoral fins. As they age, they tend to become darker in color with the face and frontal part of the body taking on a cinnamon orange, while the body fades to a dark orange or black color. Cinnamon Clownfish are a very hardy species that do very well in fish-only aquariums and reef environments. They are very territorial and will vigorously defend their territory from other clownfish and similarly sized fish species. They become more aggressive with size and age, but should be considered more territorial than overly aggressive. When kept in smaller aquariums, this species should be the only clownfish species kept and should be kept with other semi-aggressive fish species. In larger aquariums, this species can be kept with a vast range of other marine fish species. Cinnamon Clownfish will prefer a host anemone, but this is not an absolute requirement. This species is usually seen with bulb tipped anemones (ex. Entacmaea quadricolor) or leathery sea anemones (ex. Heteractus crispa), but may also accept other similar type anemone species. This species will not harm corals or invertebrates, thus is suitable for reef and FOWLR aquariums. Cinnamon Clownfish are omnivores that will appreciate a mixed diet of meaty and herbivore preparations. While this species will happily eat flaked foods, its diet should ideally include flake, frozen and live meaty foods. Herbivore flake or frozen preparations will also be readily accepted. Cinnamon Clownfish are aggressive eaters and will boldly accept food offered to them. Ideally they should be fed small meals 2 to 3 times a day.
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