Categories
Scribbled Angelfish
(Chaetodontoplus duboulayi) Moderate Semi-aggressive 10" 110 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Coral Sea, Australia Pomacanthidae Angels (Large) Fish Only The Scribbled Angelfish (also seldomly referred to as Duboulay's Angelfish), named for its abundance of intricate markings, is a very popular angelfish species that is endemic to the Coral Sea along the Great Barrier Reef of northeastern Australia. Scribbled Angelfish have an array of multi-hued, blue markings on the dorsal fin, each flank, and the anal fin (with some speckling commonly bleeding into the caudal section). The blue is contrasted by bright yellow sections at the mouth (and forward facial area), a "skunk-like" dorsal stripe (straddling each side of the dorsal fin and finally joining the caudal section while remaining above the lateral line), and a thick, vertical band running from the top of the head and across the operculum, pectoral fins, pelvic fins, and wrapping at the breast. The Scribbled Angelfish will also have a blue section between the yellow areas of the face and the thick, vertical band (appearing as a blue, vertical band from the forehead, over the eyes, to just under the neck); there will also commonly be a white, oblique blotch running vertically across the rear operculum. Scribbled Angelfish are generally peaceful towards other tank mates, often being very timid when young and while acclimating and should not initially be housed with fish that may bully them. Scribbled Angelfish will become territorial towards conspecifics and should be house singly unless provided with an extremely large aquarium. Scribbled Angelfish are currently priced extremely high and can sometimes be hard to acquire, although they are gradually becoming more affordable within the hobby as their numbers increase. Scribbled Angelfish require an aquarium of no less than 110 gallons and they should be provided with plenty of live rock for grazing, shelter and territory in addition to adding an element of natural filtration to assist with stable water conditions (which they require) in an established aquarium. For a happy specimen and a healthy system, they should be provided with efficient biological and mechanical filtration as well as a high quality protein skimmer. Scribbled Angelfish are in the pomacanthidae family, which is named for the presence of lower opercular spines which in addition to serving in a defensive role, can also lead to severe gill damage if they are ever collected with a net; if collection ever becomes necessary, they should be coaxed into a separate container with a flattened net, which can later be used to cover the top of the container preventing escape and injury. Most tank mates will coexist well with this species as they are not aggressive, although they can be with their own kind as well as other angelfish; it's not recommended to mix them with conspecifics unless they system is very large. They are not compatible with reef aquariums as they will eat sponges, nip at clam mantles, munch on sessile invertebrates (coral), and small, benthic invertebrates. Scribbled Angelfish are generally kept in large, well established FOWLR environments where they will quickly become the center of attention. Scribbled Angelfish are omnivores that prefer to eat sessile invertebrates (i.e.; anemones, soft corals, sponges), marine algae, and small, benthic invertebrates in the wild. In the aquarium they should be presented with a wide variety of live, fresh, or frozen and vitamin-enriched brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, chopped krill, chopped clams, marine algae, zucchini, spinach, romaine lettuce, and quality Spirulina-based flake foods for angelfish and herbivores. Feed them multiple small meals every day (at least 3 times). If a specimen doesn't initially eat during acclimation, they can be enticed to eat with live brine shrimp, ghost shrimp, and freshly chopped seafood.
AD Admin
Majestic Angelfish
(Pomacanthus navarchus) Moderate Semi-aggressive 12" 125 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Pomacanthidae Angels (Large) Fish Only Majestic Angelfish are an elegant and brightly colored species commonly observed along the coral reefs throughout the tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific. Majestic Angelfish are one of the most popular angelfish species within the hobby due to their large size as well as their beautiful coloration and markings, but they are only recommended for experienced hobbyists due to their preference for pristine water quality and stable chemistry. As they mature, the darker, juvenile color form of the Majestic Angelfish will gradually fade away to be replaced by its vivid, adult coloration of bright orange-yellow and varying hues of dark to bright blue. Majestic Angelfish are generally peaceful towards other tank mates, but may become quite territorial and aggressive toward conspecifics and other angelfish species; it's recommended that they be housed singly in a well established aquarium environment. Majestic Angelfish are an extremely attractive and rewarding choice for experienced hobbyists that can meet their needs; they are generally available through online retailers and local vendors alike, but may sometimes be quite pricey. Majestic Angelfish should be housed in an aquarium of no less than 125 gallons and require plenty of live rock, forming multiple caves and crevices for territory and shelter. They require pristine water quality and should only be introduced to a well established aquarium due to their sensitivity to unstable conditions. They should also be provided with strong biological and mechanical filtration and the utilization of a high quality protein skimmer. Majestic Angelfish are in the pomacanthidae family and have lower opercular spines which can cause them to suffer from severe gill damage if they are ever collected with a net; if collection ever becomes necessary, they should be coaxed into a separate container with a flattened net, which can later be used to cover the top of the container preventing escape and injury. They will usually coexist peacefully with other tank mates aside from conspecifics and other angelfish. The Majestic Angelfish is not reef friendly due to its affinity for sessile invertebrates, benthic invertebras, and small pelagic invertebrates (including tiny ornamental shrimp); they are ideally suited for large FOWLR aquariums. Majestic Angelfish are omnivorous and generally eat sessile invertebrates (e.g.; soft corals, anemones, sponges), small benthic invertebrates, and marine algae in the wild. In the aquarium they should be presented with a wide variety of live, fresh, or frozen and vitamin-enriched brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, krill, chopped clams, marine algae, zucchini, spinach, romaine lettuce, and quality Spirulina-based flake foods for angelfish and herbivores. Feed them multiple small meals every day (at least 3 times). If a specimen isn't eating well during acclimation, they can be coaxed with live treats of brine shrimp, ghost shrimp, or fresh, chopped seafood (especially clams).
AD Admin
Lamarck's Angelfish
(Genicanthus lamarck) Moderate Peaceful 8" 110 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore, Planktivore Indo-Pacific Pomacanthidae Angels (Large) Fish Only Lamarck's Angelfish are a hardy and interesting angelfish species, endemic to the coral reefs of the tropical Indo-Pacific. The Lamarck's Angelfish is notable among other angelfish as one of the few sexually dimorphic fish of the pomacanthidae family (males usually have a bright yellow blotch on the forehead in addition to longer and "sharper" caudal fin edges) as well as being a member of the Genicanthus genus, which are the only genus among angelfish to contain planktivores. Juvenile Lamarck's Angelfish are usually very dark with electric blue markings, but the juvenile color form will lighten and begin to change as they mature (around 5"). The adult coloration of the Lamarck's Angelfish is very similar to its juvenile form as most of the dark areas are generally just replaced with an attractive dark to bright orange coloration. Lamarck's Angels are relatively peaceful with other tank mates, but they have been known to become territorial (especially towards conspecifics) once they are acclimated and have become established. The more territory and open space provided for them, the less aggressive they will turn out to be. They are quite popular and are sometimes hard to acquire within the hobby, although they are frequently special ordered through local vendors and online auctions/dealers when they aren't available through normal channels. In the wild, Lamarck's Angelfish generally prefer to live in groups of a single male and 2 to 6 females; in an aquarium it would be ideal and generally more realistic to house a small group consisting of a single male and two females in an aquarium of 240+ gallons. A single male should be provided with a 110+ gallon aquarium setup with a live sand substrate and plenty of live rock for grazing, refuge, and territory. They should also be provided with a plenty of open swimming space for when they decide to cruise around. Angelfish can be sensitive to fluctuations in water chemistry and pristine conditions should be sustained by the use of high quality biological and mechanical filtration used in conjunction with a high quality protein skimmer. Lamarck's Angelfish are members of the pomacanthidae family, specifically named for the presence of lower opercular spines, which are used for defense, but can lead to severe gill damage if they tangled in a net. If specimen collection becomes necessary, they should be coaxed into a collection container with a flattened net that can then be used to cover the top of the container reducing the risk of escape and injury. They are generally peaceful and will coexist well with a wide variety of heterospecific as well as conspecific tank mates, but can become territorial with and occasionally chase other planktivorous species that they perceive to compete with them for food (anthias, wrasse, pseudochromis, basslets, etc.). Lamarck's Angelfish make excellent reef inhabitants, being planktivores, they completely ignore stony coral species, sessile invertebrates, ornamental shrimp, and the cleaning crew (snails, hermit crabs, sand sifting starfish, urchins, cucumbers, etc.); they also make great candidates for a large FOWLR system. Lamarck's Angelfish are omnivorous planktivores that prefer eating planktonic foods from the water column in their natural habitat. In the aquarium they should be offered a wide selection of live, fresh, or frozen and vitamin-enriched brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, chopped krill, chopped clams, chopped squid, chopped mussels, and quality Spirulina-based flake and prepared foods for angelfish and herbivores. Feed them at least three small meals a day. If a specimen doesn't initially eat during acclimation, they can be enticed with live brine shrimp, ghost shrimp, and freshly chopped seafood items.
AD Admin
Regal Angelfish
(Pygoplites diacanthus) Expert Semi-aggressive 10" 125 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Pomacanthidae Angels (Large) Fish Only The Regal Angelfish is an attractive and colorful fish that can be found living among the tropical coral reefs throughout the Indo-Pacific. Regal Angelfish are one of the most colorful angelfish species with their vivid coloration of bright blue, yellow, black, and white. Regal Angelfish are generally peaceful, but they can become territorial with conspecifics and should be housed singly. Some Regal Angelfish have been known to bully tank mates with a similar appearance or eating habits, but will usually leave heterospecific tank mates alone. Regal Angelfish are not usually compatible in a reef environment as they are known to nip at LPS and soft coral species as well as clam mantles, sponges, and tunicates; they will also consume ornamental and nuisance marine algae within their aquarium. Regal Angelfish are an excellent choice for advanced hobbyists looking to add brilliant color and constant activity to their aquarium. Regal Angelfish are usually available within the hobby and can be obtained through online vendors and local retailers. Regal Angelfish require an aquarium of at least 125 gallons and should be provided with plenty of live rock for multiple hiding places and adequate territory. They are a highly sensitive species and require pristine and stable water parameters in addition to an already well established aquarium environment; they are only recommended for the more experienced hobbyists that can meet their special needs. They must be provided with strong and efficient biological and mechanical filtration as well as a high quality protein skimmer. Regal Angelfish are members of the pomacanthidae family and have lower opercular spines that can lead to severe gill damage if they are netted; if it becomes necessary to collect an individual from an aquarium, they should be coaxed into a container with a flattened net, which can then be used to cover the top to prevent injury or escape. They will generally get along well with other tank mates except for other angelfish or members of the same species (unless paired) or tank mates that have a similar appearance. Regal Angelfish are not reef compatible as they will consume various LPS and soft coral species as well as tiny crustaceans, clam mantles, sponges, and tunicates. Regal Angelfish are omnivores that mainly feed upon sponges and sessile invertebrates in their natural environment. Their dietary needs in the aquarium should consist of a variety of live, fresh, or frozen and vitamin enriched brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, krill, clams, marine algae, zucchini, spinach, romaine lettuce, and quality Spirulina-based flake foods for angelfish and herbivores. Feed multiple small meals each day (at least 3 times). This species may sometimes refuse to eat while acclimating to a new aquarium; it may be enticed to eat by offering live shrimp or fresh, chopped clams.
AD Admin
Koran Angelfish
(Pomacanthus semicirculatus) Moderate Semi-aggressive 14" 125 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Pomacanthidae Angels (Large) Fish Only Koran Angelfish are large members of the pomachanthid family (Latin translation: “pom” (cover) and “acanthus” (thorn) referring to their single, lower opercular spines) endemic to tropical reefs throughout the Indo-Pacific. Juvenile Koran Angelfish have a similar appearance to and are often mistaken for juvenile Emporer Angelfish (which have several circular markings as opposed to the semicircular markings of juvenile Koran Angelfish); they have a black base coloration with semicircular banding and markings of vivid blue and bright white, which has earned them the common nickname of the Semicircle Angelfish. As they mature (around 5") the markings of Koran Angelfish will gradually fade off as they approach their drastically different adult coloration. Koran Angelfish are peaceful as juveniles and can appear indifferent towards larger tank mates; however, once mature they can be very territorial toward conspecifics and only one specimen should be housed in an aquarium. Some Koran Angelfish have been known to bully tank mates with a similar appearance or eating habits, but will usually ignore dissimilar, heterospecific tank mates; Koran Angelfish should be the last fish introduced into an aquarium. Koran Angelfish are not compatible in a reef environment as they will pick at and destroy various sessile invertebrates (corals), sponges, clam mantles, crustaceans, and mollusks; as well as ornamental and nuisance marine algae. Due to their hardiness and excellent coloration, Koran Angelfish are ideal candidates for more advanced hobbyists with large FOWLR systems and are commonly available via local and online retailers. Koran Angelfish should be housed in an aquarium of at least 125 gallons and must be provided with a large amount of live rock for grazing, hiding, and territory. In addition to open swimming space, high light intensity, and strong water movement they demand pristine water conditions and must be provided with quality filtration to include biological and mechanical as well as efficient protein skimming. Due to the presence of opercular spines on many angelfish species, its not recommended to net them as they can get stuck, causing severe gill damage. A flattened net used in conjunction with a container can be used to collect a specimen if the need should arise; the specimen could be coaxed into the container with the net, which can then be used to cover the top to prevent escape. Although they will coexist peacefully with dissimilar tank mates (which are often ignored altogether), as Koran Angelfish mature they will become highly aggressive towards conspecific and similar, heterospecific tank mates; only one Koran Angelfish should be housed per aquarium and is recommended as the last tank inhabitant to be added to a system. They are recommended for large FOWLR systems and are not compatible in a reef aquarium as they will eat cleaning crews, ornamental marine algae, coral species, mollusks, and sponges. Koran Angelfish are omnivores that mainly feed upon crustaceans, coral species, marine algae, sponges, and zooplankton in the wild. Their aquarium diet should consist of a variety of live, fresh, frozen, or freeze-dried, and vitamin enriched brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, krill, chopped clams, marine algae, zucchini, spinach, romaine lettuce, nori, and quality Spirulina-based flake foods for angelfish and herbivores. Feed multiple small meals each day (at least 3 times).
AD Admin
Blueline Angelfish
(Chaetodontoplus septentrionalis) Moderate Semi-aggressive 10" 90 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Japanese Pacific Pomacanthidae Angels (Large) Fish Only Blueline Angelfish are a highly attractive and colorful species that are endemic to tropical reefs around Japan and the Ryukyu Islands. As juveniles they are very dark brown to black and have a vertical yellow band that is even with their rear operculum; they also have yellow rear edges on their anal and dorsal fins, and a thin, yellow stripe on their face and lips. Their blue markings will become more abundant as they mature (at around 4-5") and their base coloration will morph to a yellow with a slight hint of green while their anal and dorsal fins remain dark. Blueline Angelfish are peaceful as juveniles, but once mature they can sometimes harass other tank mates with similar eating habits. Blueline Angelfish are a popular species, but they can be hard to find within the hobby; they can sometimes be special ordered locally or found through online vendors. Blueline Angelfish should be housed in an aquarium of at least 90 gallons and be provided with a sand substrate in addition to large amounts of live rock for grazing, shelter, and territory. They prefer to have adequate water movement, open swimming space, and quality water conditions; they should be provided with quality filtration to include biological, mechanical, and protein skimming. As they mature they will establish their territory and become more aggressive towards other tank mates (especially other angels) and should be the last fish introduced or added at the same time as tank mates while still a juvenile. They are recommended for community, FOWLR aquariums as they are known to snack on clam mantles, live corals, small invertebrates, and sponges. Blueline Angelfish are omnivores and within their natural environment they can be found weaving around the reef, eating algae, clam mantles, live corals, small invertebrates, and sponges. Their aquarium diet should consist of a variety of live, frozen, or freeze-dried, and vitamin enriched brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, krill, chopped clams, marine algae, and quality Spirulina-based flake foods for angelfish and herbivores. Feed at least 2-3 times a day.
AD Admin
Cortez Angelfish
(Pomacanthus zonipectus) Moderate Semi-aggressive 18" 125 gallons 72-79° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Mexico, Sea of Cortez Pomacanthidae Angels (Large) Fish Only Cortez Angelfish receive their name from their natural home territory of the Sea of Cortez off the coast of Mexico. Cortez Angels are one of the few fish species from this region that make it into the marine aquarium trade. As juveniles, they exhibit dark black bodies with yellow and blue stripes running vertically and going from their mouth down to their tail fins. As adults, their bodies take on a more muted brown / gray coloration with areas of blue and yellow highlighting accents. Although Cortez Angelfish are not as brightly colored as other members of their genus, they do have a strong presence and are interesting and graceful swimmers that standout in larger marine aquariums. They also tend to be more hardy than many other large Angelfish found within the hobby and are a bit better suited for hobbyists who haven't been keeping marine aquariums for too long. Cortez Angels are a large species of Angelfish, thus a responsible hobbyist should only keep this species in larger aquariums that are typically six feet or greater in length and 125 plus gallons in size. Cortez Angels are best suited for FOWLR (fish only with live rock) style aquariums that contain a fair amount of live rock, but plenty of open swimming rooms to accommodate large fish species. They make excellent additions to larger aquariums containing other larger fish species with semi-aggressive to aggressive personalities. This species is not well suited for reef aquariums or aquariums containing corals or other delicate invertebrates, as the Cortez Angelfish will see many of these invertebrate species as a food source. They should also not be kept with other similarly sized, colored and shaped large Angelfish species (like the French or Grey Angelfish) as they will fight with them aggressively over territory within the aquarium. Only very large aquariums can accommodate multiple large Angelfish together, and even then there are hurdles to overcome in getting them to coexist peacefully. As a large bodied fish species the Cortez Angel puts out a fair amount of waste, which puts pressure on the filtration system of the aquarium. They should be kept in aquariums with strong mechanical, biological and chemical filtration with strong water currents and plenty of dissolved oxygen in the water. It is recommended that a protein skimmer and wet/dry filtration unit be used, along with additional pumps for water currents and bi-monthly partial water changes to keep the aquarium water quality high. Cortez Angelfish require a balanced and varied diet that contains meaty items, plenty marine algae and sponge material. A high quality marine angelfish frozen or flake food should be supplemented with dried marine algae or seaweed along with frozen meaty items like mysis shrimp or krill. Ideally their aquarium should contain plenty of live rock with marine algae, plant and sponge growth on which the Cortez Angel can graze on between feedings.
AD Admin
Vermiculated Angelfish
(Chaetodontoplus mesoleucus) Moderate Peaceful 8" gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Western Pacific, Japan Pomacanthidae Angels (Large) Fish Only The Vermiculated Angelfish or as it is also commonly know as the Singapore Angelfish comes from the tropical western pacific, extending from as far north as Japan to Australia in the south. It is found inhabiting shallow reefs and lagoons up to 60 feet in depth. This species is well suited for established FOWLR (fish only with live rock) aquariums with plenty of live rock and other non-aggressive community fish species as tank mates. The Vermiculated Angelfish will spend a lot of time grazing live rock for many types of algae including filamentous and diatom, thus should be provided an environment to allow for it so swim in and out of the reef grazing. This species is not recommended for reef aquariums as it will nip at many forms of corals. The Vermiculated Angelfish, has been likened to a butterflyfish because of its body structure. It has blue lips and a yellow nose, which abruptly changes to a black vertical band over the eyes, somewhat resembling a mask. The mask is bordered with another thin vertical band of yellow, followed by a wider vertical band of white. The rest of the body is a mix of black, white and gray coloration that fades to black and extends to the dorsal fin and just before the tail fin. The dorsal and anal fins are outlined in brilliant sapphire-blue and the caudal fin is a bright yellow. Vermiculated Angelfish inhabit shallow coral reefs and lagoons in the wild, and at an adult size of about 7 inches are a good size for the home marine aquarium. However, they are somewhat on the shy side and while some will acclimate well to aquarium life, others can be difficult to adjust. The best environment for this species is a 55 gallon or larger aquarium with plenty of live rock and tank mates that are non-aggressive. Plenty of live rock will give the Vermiculated Angel plenty of places to hide when threatened, which will give it a comfort zone so that it can swim freely and not feel exposed. Since this species is very peaceful and non-boisterous, it does best with other species with a similar disposition. Vermiculated Angelfish are not well suited for reef aquariums as they will pick at both stony and soft corals, along with sessile inverts such as clams. In the wild the Vermiculated Angel feeds on algae, sponge and meaty foods when they become available. In the home aquarium, they should be fed a varied diet that includes: angelfish preparations containing sponge material, meaty frozen and flaked preparations and either frozen or live mysid shrimp or other finely chopped meaty marine items. Plenty of live rock in the aquarium will also give them areas to graze for algae and micro-organisms.
AD Admin
Flagfin Angelfish
(Apolemichthys trimaculatus) Difficult Peaceful - except with other large Angels 10" 75 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Pomacanthidae Angels (Large) Fish Only Flagfin Angelfish are usually found in the wild living on reef slopes and rocky drop-offs, but can also be found in shallow reef areas and lagoons. In the wild this species is seen in mated pairs or as a solitary individual. Juveniles generally stay deeper down in the reef and prefer the protection of many rocky crevices and caves, while adults of the species can be found anywhere from around 10 feet to 180 feet of water. Three-spot Angelfish inhabit waters ranging from the Indo-West Pacific, East Africa, and throughout South-east Asia and Micronesia, north to Japan, south to Australia and east to Samoa. Flagfin Angelfish are moderately sized at ten inches which makes them larger than most dwarf angelfish, but not as large as most full size angelfish. They have a yellow body with bright blue lips and three spots on their head, with the black spot on the forehead being very clear and two more faint spots behind each gill cover. They also have a black and white striped anal fin, which looks a bit like a flag and gives them their common name of Flagfin Angelfish. Juvenile Flagfin Angelfish are similar to adults, but lack the spots around the head. They have a narrow black band through eye and a series of golden bars on the side. The Flagfin Angelfish is a good size for the home aquarium, since its adult length is around 10 inches; however, it can be difficult to keep because of its semi-specialized dietary requirement of sponges. This species has become easier to maintain as high quality angelfish preparations with sponge material have come onto the market, as it is important to provide a varied diet containing sponge material to keep the immune system of this species strong. This species is best kept in a community fish aquarium with live rock, as it will be destructive to a reef environment as it considers many species living in a reef aquarium as food. 75 gallon or larger aquariums with plenty of live rock, with many caves and crevices will provide the Flagfin Angelfish with an excellent environment. This species should only be kept with others of its own species as a mated pair. It is extremely important to replicate the diet of this species to what it would consume in the wild in order to provide it proper nutrition and maintain a healthy immune system. In the wild the Flagfin Angelfish consumes lots of sponge material, algae, sea squirts and other plant material. In the home aquarium it is important to provide a mixed diet of a high quality angelfish preparation including sponge material and vitamin-enriched plant and meaty foods. A combination diet of spirulina algae enriched brine shrimp, mysid shrimp, marine vegetables or seaweed along with plenty of live rock for grazing, will provide the Three-spot Angel with the varied diet that it requires.
AD Admin
Rock Beauty Angelfish
(Holacanthus tricolor) Difficult Semi-aggressive 10" 90 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Caribbean, Western Atlantic Pomacanthidae Angels (Large) Reef Compatible The Rock Beauty is an angelfish species that is found in shallow reef habitats of the tropical western Atlantic. It is found from Georgia to Bermuda and the Bahamas, and from Florida to southeastern Brazil. The Rock Beauty is active during the day where it inhabits rock jetties, reef rubble, and coral reefs to depths of upto 330 feet (100 m). Juveniles reside among fire corals or hide in rock crevices and caves. Like most angelfish, the Rock Beauty is very territorial, rarely venturing more than a few feet from their protective shelter. It is best to keep this a the only large angelfish species in an aquarium, unless the aquarium is very large and has enough room for multiple angelfish to establish territories. In contrast to other large angelfish, Rock Beauties do not participate in cleaning station activities with either cleaner wrasses or shrimp. While it will aggressively defend its territory against other large angelfish, the Rock Beauty can coexist with most other community fish and invertebrate species. The Rock Beauty has a discus-shaped body that is easily distinguished from other members of the family by its distinctive black and yellow coloration. The head and tail are bright yellow, with the bulk of the middle part of the body being black in color. The lips, eyes, and margins of the dorsal and anal fins are an iridescent blue and the caudal fin is entirely yellow. The front edge of the anal fin and edge of gill cover are orange, with the upper and lower part of the iris being a bright blue. The juveniles share the same colors of the adults but not the same pattern, with the juvenile being entirely bright yellow except for a small blue-ringed black spot under the dorsal fin. As the juvenile grows, the black spot increases in size and spreads throughout the body, and the blue ring eventually disappears as the fish matures. The Rock Beauty does best in large aquariums with lots of live rock to provide it with algal grazing opportunities and territorial needs. Large rock crevices and caves will enable the Rock Beauty to feel protected and give it a much needed territory to patrol. While this species is not overly aggressive, it will fight with other large angelfish and should only be kept with similar angelfish species in a very large aquarium with lots of live rock and terrain. This species is somewhat difficult to keep in the marine aquarium because of its somewhat specialized feeding needs and the requirement of very high quality water conditions. The Rock Beauty requires a lot of sponge and marine algae in its diet in order to maintain a strong immune system. The diet of the Rock Beauty is the main reason that this species is considered difficult to keep in the home aquarium. Their diet consists of mainly sponges but they have been known to occasionally feed on corals, tunicates, and algae. It is important to provide a quality angelfish preparation that contains lots of sponge, Spirulina and algae for the Rock Beauty to do well and maintain a healthy immune system. Rock Beauties will also consume live or frozen meaty items, which can make up to approximately 35% of their diet with the rest coming from sponge and marine algae. Plenty of live rock should be provided to allow for algal grazing along with the addition of dried seaweed or other marine vegetation.
AD Admin