Categories
Multicolor Angelfish
(Centropyge multicolor) Moderate Semi-aggressive 4" 40 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Marshall Islands Pomacanthidae Angels (Dwarf) Reef Compatible Multicolor Angelfish are found fairly infrequently within the aquarium hobby, where they are sold under a variety of common names including: Multicolor Angelfish, Pastel Pygmy Angelfish or Many-colored Angelfish. In nature they are found living in and around deeper reef slopes, ranging from areas of rocky rubble all the way to areas of dense coral growth. They are found singularly for short periods of time as maturing juveniles, but will quickly form harems of 3 to 8 individuals with a single dominant male and female. Despite being an omnivore, the Multicolor Angelfish consumes much more algae and plant material than it does meaty foods in its diet within it natural habitat. They will quickly adjust to commercial aquarium foods of all types, but for best overall health and to maintain a strong immune system, hobbyists should feed them a diet high in marine algae and seaweed. The Multicolor Angelfish tends to be more secretive and delicate to keep in captivity than many of the more commonly found dwarf Angelfish aquarium species like the Coral Beauty or the Lemonpeel Angelfish. While the Multicolor Angelfish can do quite well within the aquarium environment, they are much more likely to survive and thrive when provided with plenty of live rock and hiding places. When first introducing this species to the aquarium it is important to take time and acclimate them slowly, both to adjust to the water chemistry and to provide them with dimmed lighting for 30 minutes to an hour after being introduced into the aquarium. They do best in tanks with calm, peaceful tank mates and should only be kept with other dwarf Angelfish in longer, larger aquariums like a 125 gallon or larger tank. Multicolor Angels are not suitable for aquariums with more aggressive tank mates like large Angelfish, aggressive Damselfish species or any predatory fish like Triggers or Groupers. They do best in peaceful fish aquariums or reef aquariums where they won't be bothered by tank mates and will have plenty of caves, crevices and other structures to explore, forage for algae and retreat to when threatened. Unlike some dwarf Angelfish species, Multicolor Angelfish do well in many reef environments as they are not known to bother most corals and invertebrates. However, some specimens have been known to nip at some stony corals and clam mantles, but overall they tend to be on the less destructive side of the dwarf Angelfish scale when it comes to corals and sessile inverts. Being an omnivore, the Multicolor Angelfish should be fed a varied diet of both vegetable based and meaty food in order to provide the vitamins, minerals and nutrients required for good health and a strong immune system. It is best to feed a mix of commercial meaty and vegetable based foods, or foods designed for marine omnivores. Multicolor Angels will readily accept flake, freeze-dried or frozen commercial marine fish foods; as well as, fresh or frozen meaty foods made from quality marine based meaty items like shrimp, squid or mussels. Additionally, they should be provided with plenty of marine based vegetable matter either via commercial foods like dried seaweed or marine algae flakes or through algae grazing opportunities from the presence of plenty of live rock within the aquarium. This species will actively graze on marine algae growing on rock work or the aquarium glass.
AD Admin
Flameback Angelfish
(Centropyge aurantonotus) Easy Semi-aggressive 3" 20 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Brazil, Southern Caribbean Pomancanthidae Angels (Dwarf) Reef Compatible Flameback Angelfish (Centropyge aurantonotus) originate from the coastal waters of Brazil and the southern most portions of the Caribbean sea, where they inhabit coral reefs and surrounding rocky outcrops. In nature they use their small size to move in and out of the reef hunting for tiny crustaceans, amphipods, copepods and other similar prey items. Much to the annoyance of many hobbyists, the Flameback Angelfish also feeds on corals polyps and the fleshy portions of soft corals and clam mantles. While their small size makes the Flameback Angelfish an attractive species for hobbyists with smaller nano-aquariums, the damage they can cause to reef systems limits suitable aquarium environments. Like many marine fish species the Flameback Angelfish is commonly sold under a wide variety of common names including: Flameback Angelfish, Flameback Pygmy Angelfish, Brazilian Flameback Angelfish, Fireball Angelfish and Fireball Pygmy Angelfish. It is also often confused with its African cousin the African Flameback Angelfish (Centropyge acanthops), whose very similar appearance makes it difficult for the untrained eye to differentiate the two. The Caribbean based Flameback Angelfish is distinguished from the its African cousin by its dark blue tail fin, with the African Flameback Angelfish exhibiting a yellowish/orange tail fin. The small adult size of the Flameback Angelfish makes it well suited for nano aquariums and smaller FOWLR setups. Flameback Angels are generally peaceful towards other fish in the aquarium, but will typically show aggression towards other Pygmy Angelfish. However, hobbyists with very large aquariums (6 to 8 foot designs) are often able to keep multiple pygmy angelfish in the same aquarium since they can establish their own territories due to the overall size of the tank. They can be housed in reef aquariums, but they will pick at coral polyps and fleshy clam mantles. In general Flameback Angelfish should only be considered for reef aquariums that have coral species that are noxious to fish and that will not be seen as food. The primary requirement for the Flameback Angel is plenty of live rock and other peaceful to semi-aggressive tank mates. Flameback Angelfish (Centropyge aurantonotus) require a varied diet that contains both plant and animal matter. They do best with smaller food items like brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, dwarf angelfish frozen foods, staple flake foods (Formula I & II) and other similar food items designed for marine omnivores. They will also appreciate the grazing opportunities that mature live rock provides in terms of algae, sponge and small organisms that are found growing on the surface of established live rock. Ideally they should be fed 2 to 3 small meals over the course of the day, comprised of an amount of food that they will consume within a few minutes.
AD Admin
Midnight Angelfish
(Centropyge nox) Moderate Semi-aggressive 4" 30 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Fiji, Indo-Pacific Pomacanthidae Angels (Dwarf) Fish Only The Black Nox Angelfish (Centropyge nox) goes by a variety of common names within the aquarium hobby including: Midnight Angelfish, Black Angelfish, Black Nox Angelfish, Nox Angelfish and Black Pigmy Angelfish. They originate from the tropical reefs off of Fiji and throughout much of the Indo-Pacific, where they are found living in and around coral reefs and rocky outcrops. Their solid black coloration makes them stand out in the average marine aquarium as they contrast the bright coloration of most marine corals and fish species. Midnight Angelfish are generally considered one of the more peaceful Centropyge Angelfish species and can coexist with other peaceful Centropyge species in larger aquariums with enough live rock to create multiple territories. Dwarf Angelfish do best in aquariums that are at least 30 gallons in size and contain a good amount of live rock. They make an excellent addition to community aquariums containing other peaceful to semi-aggressive fish species. They are typically quite territorial towards their own kind and other dwarf angelfish, thus should only be housed with others dwarf angels in large aquariums capable of supplying enough territory for each specimen. Like other dwarf angelfish, the Midnight Angelfish will pick a variety of corals and sessile invertebrates including eat soft coral polyps, clam mantles, and zoanthids. They do best in reef environments with noxious corals like soft corals, mushrooms and palythoas that are generally too noxious for them to see them as a food source. Midnight Angelfish will not bother invertebrates like shrimp, snails and crabs. Hobbyists keeping multiple pygmy angel specimens together in larger aquariums should consider keeping 4 or more specimens in order to spread out any potential aggression amongst all the fish. The diet of the Midnight Angelfish should include marine algae, spirulina, high-quality angelfish preparations, and other meaty items such as brine or krill. This species should ideally be fed two to three times daily what the fish will consume within a minute or two. Being an omnivore it is important to provide a balanced diet of algae and meaty foods in order to provide all the necessary vitamins and nutritional required to maintain a healthy immune system. Plenty of live rock will also provide grazing opportunities for the Midnight Angelfish between feedings.
AD Admin
Bicolor Angelfish
(Centropyge bicolor) Moderate Semi-Aggressive 6" 30 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Fiji, New Caledonia, Papua New Guinea Pomacanthidae Angels (Dwarf) Reef Compatible Bicolor Angelfish are a species of pygmy or dwarf angelfish that get their name from their contrasting blue and yellow coloration. Bicolor Angels have a unique body shape for a dwarf angelfish with a more elongated body than other dwarf angelfish species, which gives them the look of a larger angelfish in a small body. Bicolor angels will spend much of their day swimming in and out of rocky caves and crevices looking for algae or small organisms on which to feed. If kept in a well established aquarium with plenty of live rock and at least 30 gallons of water volume, the Bicolor Angelfish should thrive. While a minimum of 30 gallons is required for this species to do well, a larger of aquarium of 55 gallons or greater is recommended so that the Bicolor Angelfish can truly thrive. Bicolor Angelfish need plenty of live rock on which to graze and for protection if they feel threatened. This species will do very well in most any FOWLR (fish only with live rock) community aquarium where it can be kept peacefully with a large variety of other community species. As with most dwarf angelfish, the Bicolor Angelfish should not be kept with other dwarf angelfish as they will fight with each other to the point where one is likely to die. The only exception to this is when they are kept in very large aquariums that can support many dwarf angelfish species and provide each of them a suitable amount of territory. While something like a 300 gallon aquarium with 350 plus pounds of live rock with 4 or more different dwarf angelfish species can be achieved due to the amount of territory and number of species kept. However, even in this scenario where it is possible to keep multiple dwarf angelfish together, there will still be some squabbling but unlikely to lead to serious injuries or death. Bicolor Angelfish are a pretty hardy fish species, but it is highly recommended that they are kept in established aquariums as they do not tend to do well in newly established tanks. It is generally not recommended to keep the Bicolor Angel in a reef aquarium as they are well known to be coral nippers that will nip at soft corals, stony corals and sessile invertebrates. The Bicolor Angelfish requires a varied diet that is high in vegetable matter and especially various types of marine algae. It is highly recommended that they are kept with large amounts of established live rock, so that they can supplement their diet by grazing. Mysis or brine shrimp make an excellent food offering to encourage the Bicolor Angel to begin feeding when it is first introduced to the aquarium. Long term the Bicolor will need a diet that is based mostly on marine angelfish preparations (either frozen or flaked) that have marine algae Spirulina and sponge material and supplemented with meaty preparations such as mysis shrimp, brine shrimp or other meaty foodstuffs.
AD Admin
Rusty Angelfish
(Centropyge ferrugatus) Moderate Semi-aggressive 4" 30 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Western Pacific, Philippines Pomacanthidae Angels (Dwarf) Reef Compatible The Rusty Angelfish is named for its rusted red coloration accented with black dots that decrease in size from dorsal to anal and pelvic fins. The anal fin is dark and both the dorsal and anal fins are rimmed in bright, sapphire-blue. The Rusty Angelfish requires at least a 30-gallon tank with large amounts of live rock for both hiding and grazing. Unfortunately the Rusty Angelfish does not a good reef dweller, as it is prone to nip at stony and soft corals (sessile invertebrates) and clam mantles. As with most dwarf angelfish, the Rusty Angelfish should not be kept with other dwarf angelfish, with the exception being in very large aquariums (350 gallons plus) where multiple dwarf angelfish can be kept and still have enough territory to satisfy each fish. Like most species and especially pygmy angelfish the Rusty Angelfish is territorial towards other Dwarf Angelfish and other similarly sized and shaped fish species. Extensive rock work, live rock or reef area is required to give the Rusty Angel a suitable environment in the aquarium. The Rusty Angelfish will spend most of it's time swimming in and out of the rock work picking at marine algae and small coral polyps. They can be fairly destructive to stony corals and many forms of polyp coral, so they are best not kept in most reef aquariums. However, they can be kept with many soft corals whose flesh is more noxious and less appealing for fish to nip at or feed on. The diet of the Flame Angel should include marine algae, spirulina, high-quality angelfish preparations, and other meaty items such as brine or krill. This species should be fed two to three times daily what the fish will consume within a minute or two. Being an omnivore it is important to provide a balanced diet of algae and meats to provide all the necessary vitamins and nutritional needs.
AD Admin
Potters Angelfish
(Centropyge potteri) Difficult Peaceful, except with other Dwarf Angels 4" 30 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Hawaiian Islands Pomacanthidae Angels (Dwarf) Reef Compatible The Potter's Angelfish, or Potter's Pygmy Angelfish, is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands area, including the Johnston Atoll. The Potter's Angelfish has a brilliant color pattern that is best appreciated up close. Potter's Angelfish do well in community aquariums and most reef aquariums. As with other pygmy angelfish, the Potter's Angelfish should not be kept with other pygmy angelfish, unless in a very large aquarium where multiple specimens can stake out suitable territories. The Potter's Angelfish is a brilliant orange on its main body, marbleized with pale to dark blue. The caudal portions of the dorsal and anal fins as well as the caudal fin are a dark blue-black. The amount of blue and overall pattern of the blue can vary from specimen to specimen. With some specimens exhibiting a large body of dark blue on the body, while others this area can be much smaller. The Potter's Angelfish requires at least a 30-gallon, well-established aquarium with many rock caves and crevices for hiding places and live rock for grazing on macro algae. It may nibble on soft corals and other sessile invertebrates in the reef aquarium, and should only be kept in more hardy or large reef aquariums. Potter's Angelfish should be kept with other non boisterous marine community species, and should not be kept with other similarly sized dwarf angelfish unless in an extremely large aquarium. Potter's Angelfish are hermaphroditic, thus there are no distinguishing characteristics to help differentiate between males and females. The Potter's Angelfish should be offered a combination of both meaty foods and plant stuffs and algae including Spirulina, marine algae, high-quality angelfish preparations, mysid or frozen shrimp, and other meaty items. An established specimen may also take meaty or brine flake or similar type frozen preparations. Recommended for advanced marine aquarium hobbyist with well-established marine aquariums. Multiple caves or rock crevices are necessary to provide the Potter's Angelfish with a suitable aquarium habitat.
AD Admin
Lemonpeel Angelfish
(Centropyge flavissimus) Moderate Semi-aggressive 6" 30 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Pomacanthidae Angels (Dwarf) Reef Compatible The Lemonpeel Angelfish is a vibrant yellow color with electric blue accents around it's gills and eyes. The Lemonpeel Angelfish is often confused with the False Lemonpeel Angelfish (C. heraldi) which is identical in appearance except for the False Lemonpeel lacks the blue highlights of the true Lemonpeel Angelfish. The Lemonpeel Angelfish is not a difficult species to keep, but will require significant rock work to provide cover and give this species a place to retreat when feeling threatened. This species should only be kept with other dwarf angelfish if they are introduced at the same time (preferably when young) and within a larger aquarium (75 gallons or larger). While most dwarf angelfish including the Lemonpeel Angelfish will squabble with others of their own kind, they will get along well with most other community species. The Lemonpeel Angelfish is a vibrant yellow color with electric blue accents around it's gills and eyes. The Lemonpeel Angelfish is often confused with the False Lemonpeel Angelfish (C. heraldi) which is identical in appearance except for the False Lemonpeel lacks the blue highlights of the true Lemonpeel Angelfish. The Lemonpeel Angelfish requires at least a 30 gallon or larger aquarium with substantial live rock in order to provide hiding places and large amounts of grazing area of microalgae. Lemonpeel Angelfish are very prone to nip at large-polyped stony corals and clam mantles and can be destructive to sensitive inverts. It is best not to keep Lemonpeel Angelfish with fish of the same genera, unless both are introduced as juveniles and the aquarium is of significant size with a large amount of live rock to create adequate grazing areas for each dwarf angel to stake out their own territory. The diet of the Lemonpeel Angelfish should include Spirulina, marine algae, high-quality angelfish preparations, mysid or frozen shrimp, and other meaty items. The Lemonpeel Angelfish requires more algae and seaweed in its diet than most angels. Substantial amounts of live rock in the aquarium, will provide beneficial macro-algae growth for the Lemonpeel Angelfish to graze on.
AD Admin
Keyhole Angelfish
(Centropyge Tibicen) Moderate Semi-aggressive 8" 55 gallons 72-79° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Eastern Indian Ocean, Western Pacific Pomacanthidae Angels (Dwarf) Reef Compatible The Keyhole Angelfish is found in shallow lagoon waters and coastal reefs around southern Queensland, New South Wales, Northern Territory, and off Western Australia. It is also found around the Moluccas, Philippines, Hew Hebrides and most of the Indo-Australian Archipelago. In the north its range extends to Taiwan and southern Japan. It is one of the largest of the Centropyge genus or pygmy angels and is a little more aggressive than other pygmy angels, but is still very suitable for a community aquarium. It is best to provide large amounts of live rock for hiding and grazing, as this will provide added nutrition and shelters in which to hide when threatened. Keyhole Angels are hermaphroditic, very difficult to breed in an aquarium, and has no distinguishable differences in color between the male and female of the species. Its diet should also include spirulina, marine algae, high-quality angelfish preparations as pygmy angelfish are known to eat mostly algae in the wild, so a diet rich in vegetable matter is essential. There are several good commercial foods available including Formula II and Angel Formula. The Keyhole Angelfish is primarily a dark blue to dark brownish-blue almost black throughout most of it's body. The pelvic and lower portion of the anal fins are yellow and their is keyhole shaped white vertical bar found in the mid-central body area giving this species its name. In the Aquarium environment the Keyhole Angel is a bold swimmer, working its way around the reef work to graze on marine algae. Because it grows larger than most pygmy angels, it is a little more aggressive and will aggressively defend it's territory against other pygmy angels and other similarly shaped and sized species. While this species is territorial it does get along well with dissimilar species and can easily be kept in a community aquarium environment The Keyhole Angelfish is an omnivore and should be fed a variety of food items including: marine algae, meaty foods, Spirulina, brine shrimp etc.. They should ideally be fed several small meals throughout the day consisting of an amount of food that they will consume within a few minutes. As with most dwarf angels a mixture of meaty foods, marine algae & sponge material is vital to their health and immune system.
AD Admin
Cherub Angelfish
(Centropyge argi) Moderate Peaceful, except with other Dwarf Angels 3" 30 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Centropyge Angels (Dwarf) Reef Compatible The Cherub Angel can be found in the western Atlantic from Bermuda and Florida to French Guiana, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. The Cherub Angel is also called the Cherubfish, Pygmy Angelfish, or Atlantic Pygmy Angelfish. Like other pygmy angels the Cherub Angel requires rocky caves and crevices to dart in and out of and to provide the fish with shelter when threatened and for grazing of marine algae. Because the Cherub Angels is one of the smallest angels at a max size of 3" it is good for those with smaller aquariums, but who would still like to house an angelfish. Cherub Angels also have smaller natural territorial ranges, making them more suitable for smaller aquariums. This is a very peaceful fish with invertebrates and other species, so be sure not to keep it with other species that are too aggressive. Please see the Aquarium Behavior section below for information on keeping the Cherub Angel with other pygmy angels. Cherub Angels exhibit a brilliant sapphire-blue coloration with orange highlights to the face. A bright blue outline exists on the dorsal, caudal & tail fins. The Cherub Angel does not tend to harass invertebrates and enjoys a tank which provides many rocky shelters. Their territorial requirements are not great; therefore, it is possible to keep the Cherub Angel with other pygmy angels in a large aquarium (100 gallons plus). If you plan on having multiple pygmy angelfish in the same tank, you will want to add them at the same time to reduce the chance of any problems. In a smaller aquarium it is highly recommended that only one pygmy angel is kept per tank as there is a high probability of territorial battles which will result in the death of a fish. Cherub Angels can also be kept in matched pairs (male & female) in any suitable sized aquarium (30 gallons plus). The diet of the Cherub Angelfish should include Spirulina, marine algae, high-quality angelfish preparations, clam or frozen shrimp, and other meaty items such as brine or krill. This species should be fed two to three times daily what the fish will consume within a minute or two.
AD Admin
Pearl-Scaled Angelfish
(Centropyge vroliki) Moderate Semi-aggressive 5" 30 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Indian and Western Pacific Oceans Pomacanthidae Angels (Dwarf) Reef Compatible Peal-Scaled Angelfish are found in tropical marine waters of the Indo-West Pacific, from Christmas Island, throughout South-east Asia and Micronesia, north to Japan, south to Australia and east to the Marshall Islands. Pearl-Scaled Angelfish are most commonly found on rocky or rubble bottoms of offshore reef slopes and lagoons, especially those with rich algal and sponge fauna. In the aquarium environment they require strong reef/rock work with many caves and crevices to provide this species with a place to hide when threatened; as well as, area to graze for marine algaes. The Pearl-scaled Angelfish is brown to grey-green throughout the front and middle of the body and black around the tail section. The anal fin, caudal fin and posterior region of the dorsal fin have blue margins. The iris, pectoral fin base and area around the eyes are orange. The Pearl-Scaled Angelfish will do best in a 30 gallon or larger aquarium with plenty of live rock to provide both algae for grazing and caves and crevices for protection. This species is considered semi-aggressive as it will fight with other dwarf angelfish, but should get along well with other community fish species. The Pearl-Scaled Angelfish is suitable for many reef aquarium environments; however, caution should be used as it will eat sponges and may pick at some coral species. This is a hardy species if given plenty of marine algae and sponge material in its diet, which will help it maintain a strong immune system. Because of the need for sponge material in its diet, the Pearl-Scaled Angelfish is considered moderately difficult to keep in the home aquarium. Pearl-Scaled Angelfish feed predominately on algae and sponge material in the wild, thus a similar diet is desirable for the life in the home aquarium. A quality marine herbivore preparation that includes both marine algae and sponge material should be offered. Their diet may also be supplemented with mysid shrimp, frozen & flaked foods with algal content.
AD Admin