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Tire Track Eel
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(Mastacembelus armatus) Moderate Semi-Aggressive 30" 75 gallons 72-82° F, KH 10-16, pH 6.8-7.2 Carnivore Southeast Asia Mastacembelidae Eels Large-Bottom-Dweller The Tire Track Eel (Mastacembelus armatus) is a species of ray-finned spiny eel that is native to many parts of Southeast Asia ranging from India and Pakistan to Thailand and Vietnam. Like many other fish species the Tire Track Eel goes by a variety of common names including: spiny eel, Zigzag Eel, White-spotted Spiny Eel and Leopard Eel. Like many freshwater eel species the Tire Track Eel is not a true "Eel" but rather a species of elongated freshwater fish that closely resemble the appearance of a true eel. Many freshwater aquarium hobbyists prize this species for their size, coloration and snake like appearance that many find very interesting. Their appearance includes anal and dorsal fins that are elongated and connected to the caudal fin. Their eyes have brown stripes running laterally through them, with their backs having a dark tan color and a head that is a light beige color. Their body color is a dull brown with the brown coloration fading to a tan on their belly. The body also has one to three darker longitudinal zigzag lines that connect to form a distinct reticulated pattern that is restricted to the rear two-thirds of the body. Due to their large adult size of nearly 30 inches in length, Tire Track Eels need a larger aquarium to be housed properly. While smaller tanks can be used during the grow out phase, the Tire Track Eel will eventually need a 75 gallon or preferably larger aquarium to comfortably house an adult specimen. Tire Track Eels also need an aquarium setup with a deep soft substrate consisting of sand or a sand gravel mix that will allow them to burrow and forage in the substrate. As this species is known to both forage in the substrate and bury itself within the substrate, the aquarium decor should be designed with this in mind. Tire Track Eels should be housed with medium to large semi-aggressive species like large loaches, Gouramis, Knifefish, Geophagus, Acara or similar species that will both not harm the Eel or be seen as food to the Eel. They will see smaller fish species as prey items, thus are not suitable for aquariums with small tropical community fish like barbs and tetras. They are territorial towards their own kind, thus should not be kept with other Tire Track Eels unless within a very large aquarium capable of supporting multiple territories within the tank. Being a substrate dweller, the Tire Track Eel should have plenty of space to roam about the bottom of the aquarium and should be provided with caves, tunnels, rock crevices or similar aquarium decor to provide them shelter. Tire Track Eels do well in both freshwater and brackish water conditions; therefore, 2 teaspoons of sea salt can be added per 3 gallons of water to create brackish conditions if desired. Tire Track Eels are nocturnal carnivores in nature, where they forage for insects, insect larvae, various species of worms and other similar meaty fare. In the aquarium the Tire Track Eel will adjust to eating during periods with full aquarium lighting or in partial lighting conditions after some acclimation to the aquarium environment. They should be fed a varied diet of foods ranging from live earthworms or black worms to frozen or pellet foods ranging from krill, plankton, tubifex worms, brine shrimp, frozen bloodworms, cyclopeeze or krill. They are also likely to forage in the substrate for plant roots or in search of insect larvae, so this should be taken into consideration when designing an appropriate aquarium setup. Ideally you will want to feed the Tire Track Eel at least once a day as much as they will consume within a few minutes or multiple times if an increased growth rate is desired. They can easily go a few days without eating from time to time if necessary.
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Fire Eel
1 like Eels
(Mastacembelus erythrotaenia) Moderate Semi-Aggressive 24" 55 gallons 75-82° F, KH 10-15, pH 6.8-7.2 Carnivore Southeast Asia Mastacembelidae Eels Large-Bottom-Dweller The Fire Eel is a larger freshwater eel species that originates from warm flood plains and streams of southeast Asia including: Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia and Laos. Throughout their evolution, Fire Eels have developed very long laterally compressed bodies that have enabled them to better survive in their native habitat. Fire Eels are often found in streams with lots of vegetation and deep sediment filled riverbeds. The long slender snout and elongated body that particularly the rear third of which flattens into a broad caudal fin. Their shape allows them to easily bury themselves in the substrate and maneuver amongst thick vegetation while searching for food items. While Fire Eels spend much of their time on and buried in the substrate, they will swim at any water level if they detect food. In fact Fire Eels are often sought after by aquarium enthusiasts as they are easily trained to hand feed and will actively interact with the aquarium keeper once they have settled into the aquarium environment. The Fire Eel is actually a large freshwater fish and not a true eel, its name is a common name that references the fishes body shape and overall appearance. Fire Eels should be housed in larger aquariums that are capable of comfortably supporting their adult size of approximately 2 feet in length. This species can be kept in smaller aquariums as a juvenile and moved to larger enclosures as they grow and mature. It is best to keep this species in an aquarium with a fine sandy substrate, as the Fire Eel prefers to burrow into the substrate. Fire Eels will also prone to scratches and abrasions on their underside with course or rough substrate, which can cause infections and threaten the overall health of the fish. The aquarium should also contain plants or driftwood in order to provide the Fire Eel with places to seek shelter and provide them with a comfortable habitat. Fire Eels are not overly aggressive, but they should be kept with similarly sized semi-aggressive fish species as they will consume smaller fish species that will fit into their mouths. Lastly, it is very important for an aquarium housing a Fire Eel to have a fully covered and secured top as the Fire Eel is very prone to escaping from an uncovered aquarium. In the wild the Fire Eel consumes mostly insect larvae, insects, worms, small fish and some plant material. In the aquarium it is best to feed them bloodworms, tubifex worms and chopped fish or mussel as a juvenile. Adult specimens will need larger meaty food consisting of large worms, tablet foods, krill and other large fresh, freeze-dried or frozen meaty preparations.
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