Categories
Neolamprologus olivaceous
(Neolamprologus olivaceous) Easy Aggressive 3.5" 20 gallons 74-80° F, KH 8-25, pH 7.5-8.6 Omnivore Lake Tanganyika Cichlidae African Cichlid Cichlid-African Neolamprologus olivaceous Cichlids are endemic to Lake Tanganyika, where they are found from coast to coast inhabiting rocky caves and crevices near shorelines. As is the case with many species of African Cichlids, the Neolamprologus olivaceous is highly territorial. In the wild they will typically be found in a monogamous pair that will claim a rocky area near the lake bottom or shoreline as their territory. They will aggressively defend this territory from other similar rock dwelling species, but tend to ignore species that have different feeding and swimming patterns to their own. Neolamprologus olivaceous are available from fish stores that special in Cichlids, and are also available from time to time from online fish sellers. Both the aquarium setup and tank mates are crucial to successfully keeping Neolamprologus olivaceous. Neolamprologus olivaceous are very territorial and aggressive towards other similarly sized species. Providing an aquarium environment that creates plenty of habitat modelled after their native habitat will go a long way towards curbing their aggression towards tank mates. If they are provided an adequate amount of territory in a larger aquarium, Neolamprologus olivaceous will be able to co-exist with other dis-similarly shaped and sized Lake Tanganyika species. However, if kept in a smaller aquarium (20 to 55 gallons) they will need to be kept as a pair or with much larger Lake Tanganyika species that are not viewed as direct competition. When housed in very large aquariums (125 gallons or larger) they can be kept in larger groups or with many other species, as they will have enough room to claim their own territory and leave their tank mates alone. The aquarium should have a sandy substrate and large amounts of rocks arranged to create many caves and crevices. This is crucial because Neolamprologus olivaceous are a cave dwelling species that will look to claim some caves and rocky crevices for their territory. If housed in an aquarium without plenty of rocky caves, the Neolamprologus olivaceous will attempt to take over the whole aquarium as their territory. Hobbyists should consider keeping Neolamprologus olivaceous in either a species only or Lake Tanganyika biotope unless they have a larger aquarium. Hobbyists with larger aquariums that are well aqua-scaped should be able to provide enough territory to keep Neolamprologus olivaceous with a variety of other African Rift Lake species. It is important to maintain good water quality in order to maintain the overall health of this species. Typically hobbyists perform weekly partial water changes to maintain water quality. Quality canister and wet/dry filter systems can also be used to maintain high water quality, which should reduce the need for frequent water changes. Neolamprologus olivaceous feed on small crustaceans and planktonic animals in their natural rift lake environment. They will quickly adapt to a wide variety of commercial aquarium foods including: flake, mini-pellet, crisps, frozen and freeze-dried. Neolamprologus olivaceous are easy to feed and will eagerly consume Cichlid flakes, freeze-dried worms, brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, small pellet foods and other similar foodstuffs. It is best to feed them multiple small feedings per day. Feed an amount of food that they will completely consume within 3 to 5 minutes. Once a pair of Neolamprologus olivaceous have established themselves, they will remain together for life. An established pair will often breed if kept in an aquarium with many rocky caves, inverted clay pots or other cave like settings. Water quality needs to be high, with a water temperature between 78 to 80° and a pH of 8.2 to 8.6. They will look to spawn in a dark cave where the female will lay the eggs on the roof of the cave. Once spawning has occurred, the female will stay in the cave and protect the eggs while the male patrols the pairs entire territory. During this time they will be hyper-aggressive towards all other fish species within the aquarium. Due to this, it is best to keep them separate from other fish species if the hobbyist intends to breed them. Once hatched the young fry will be able to eat baby brine shrimp, cyclop-eeze or similar fair right away. As this species is a mouth brooder, they young can stay with their parents until they reach sexual maturity.
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Callochromis Cichlid
(Callochromis pleurospilus) Easy Semi-Aggressive 4" 55 gallons 76-82° F, KH 10-15, pH 7.8-8.6 Carnivore Lake Tanganyika Cichlidae African Cichlid Cichlid-African Callochromis pleurospilus originate from the shallows and shorelines of Lake Tanganyika, where they forge a living within the sediment rich coast areas of the lake where the plant vegetation meets the lake. Male Callochromis Cichlids spend their time patrolling and protecting a small territory, where they will aggressively chase off other males and similar sized other species. Female Callochromis Cichlids stay in a small group that will live with a single male in the males territory. When not defending territory or breeding, Callochromis Cichlids hunt for insects, small crustaceans and insect larvae in and around the roots of plants and rocky areas along the coast of the lake. Callochromis Cichlid do not exhibit the bright coloration that one tends to see from across the room, but upon closer examination they do have very brilliant colors that make them a very attractive addition to many smaller aquariums or larger community aquariums with larger species capable of dealing with their conspecific aggression. Callochromis pleurospilus do well in home aquariums that are 4 feet or more in length and provide them with a habitat similar to their natural surroundings. They will appreciate a sandy or similar substrate with plenty of rocky areas and some branch type wood pieces and plants. The key factor in successfully keeping Callochromis pleurospilus in the home aquarium is to mitigate their natural aggression through aquarium size, tank mates and proper arrangement of aquarium decorations. Male Callochromis Cichlids will exhibit a large amount of aggression towards other males of the species and males of similar species. They will also to a lesser degree harass female Callochromis pleurospilus as well. In order to mitigate this behaviour it is best to house the Callochromis pleurospilus in a four foot or larger aquarium with a single male and a small group of 4 to 6 females, or a larger (6 foot aquarium) if housed with another male or similar species. Providing plenty of rocky caves, branched wood pieces or similar decorations, will provide fish that are being chased or harassed with areas to avoid the aggression of the male Callochromis pleurospilus. As far as the overall aquarium environment, Callochromis pleurospilus do well when presented with a sandy substrate with plenty of rocky caves, crevices and similar type decorations. Callochromis pleurospilus do not have specific lighting or water movement considerations, but should be provided high quality water conditions and moderate water flow. In their natural habitat of Lake Tanganyika, Callochromis pleurospilus feed mostly on small crustaceans, insects and insect larvae. In the aquarium environment they will readily adjust to a varied diet of commercial meaty foods. Callochromis pleurospilus should be fed two to three times a day a varied diet of high quality commercial foods including: cyclop-eeze, mysis shrimp, brine shrimp, high quality flake and pellet foods, blood worms and similar other commercial preparations. In the wild males build small depressions in the sandy substrate or utilize an existing, in which to entice the female to lay her eggs. After the eggs are released and then fertilized by the male, the female scoops them into her mouth in order to protect the eggs until they hatch. The female does all of the rearing of the brood, which generally lasts approximately 3 weeks. At this time the fry will be release from the mothers mouth, where they will be left to fend for themselves. The adult male should be removed after the eggs are laid and picked up by the female, who should be removed from the breeding tank as soon as the brood is released from her mouth. The young fry should be fed freshly hatched baby brine shrimp or given finely crushed flake food.
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Blue Neon
(Paracyprichromis nigripinnis) Moderate Peaceful 4" 55 gallons 76-82° F, pH 8.5-9.5, KH 15-25 Carnivore Lake Tanganyika Cichlidae African Cichlid Cichlid-African The Blue Neon a is possibly the least aggressive cichlid on the planet. Endemic to Lake Tanganyika, Blue Neons are extremely peaceful and prefer to school together in groups of 8-10 (without any problems); they completely tolerate conspecifics and actually seem to be friendly with each other; the same can also be said in regards to heterospecific tank mates. Blue Neons have a brick-red to bright red base color with several, spaced neon-blue horizontal lines down the length of the body (from the face all the way to the caudal fin); they also have neon-blue tipped fins with neon-blue markings throughout; this is how they received their well deserved nickname. The Blue Neon is a perfect choice for beginners, all the way to expert hobbyists; they are also extremely popular and are readily available through online retailers and local stores. The Blue Neon requires an aquarium of 55 gallons or more and should be housed in a Tanganyika biotope system: A light, find sand substrate with rock rubble and plenty of dark rocks (contrasting substrate and rock shades bring out the color in the species) that make multiple caves and crevices providing shelter, territory, and multiple areas to explore (rock structures should reach the surface of the aquarium if possible). Ample swimming space is appreciated as well as decent water movement. Live plants are appreciated and add to natural biological filtration as well as more territory and shelter; African Water Ferns, Anubias, and Vallisneria are good choices and will do well in alkaline conditions. Blue Neons can easily coexist with other tranquil Tanganyika cichlids and have been known to do very well with Xenotilapia and other Sand-dwellers as well as Cyprichromis and Featherfins. The Blue Neon is a carnivore and feeds on small invertebrates, small crustaceans and plankton from among the rocks and substrate in their natural environment. In the aquarium their diet should consist of a variety of live, frozen, and freeze-dried bloodworms, daphnia, plankton, brine shrimp, and mysis shrimp, as well as vitamin-enriched flake foods and pellets. Feed what will be consumed in a few minutes, one to two times daily. Blue Neons are are maternal mouth brooders. The female cichlid will lay her eggs (usually a clutch of 10-15) on a sub-vertical surface (mainly a rock or a cave wall) the male will be in position to fertilize them. The female will gather the eggs into her mouth until the fry are ready to be released (3-4 weeks). The fry can be fed and raised on Artemia nauplii, baby brine shrimp, and finely-crushed flake food.
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Cylinder Cichlid
(Neolamprologus cylindricus) Moderate Aggressive 5" 55 gallons 76-82° F, pH 8.5-9.5, KH 15-25 Carnivore Lake Tanganyika Cichlidae African Cichlid Cichlid-African The Cylinder Cichlid is a highly aggressive, solitary predator that is endemic to Lake Tanganyika; this species doesn't tolerate others of their kind unless it is their mate. There are several different color variations based on location; mainly it's a difference of their vertical bands (of which they all have ten) varying in shades of brown or being solid black; one color morph has electric-blue tips on all of its fins as well as an upturned, electric-blue arch-like marking under each eye; there is also another variant that has a gold hue head, but the color is lost once they mature. The Cylinder Cichlid is a popular species and is usually available within the hobby. They can be special ordered from local stores and often found within clubs as well as being available through online vendors. The Cylinder Cichlid requires an aquarium of 55 gallons or more and should be provided with a sand/crushed coral substrate with plenty of rocks around the tank creating multiple caves and crevices for hiding, spawning, and hunting. Open swimming space is appreciated, but not required as they tend to stay close to their rock caves. Decent water movement is recommended as it will benefit both the fish any live plants that are utilized. Live plants don't pose any problems as Cylinder Cichlids are not known to be diggers and will generally ignore the plants; African Water Ferns, Anubias, and Vallisneria are good choices and will do well in alkaline conditions; they will also provide extra cover for predator and prey alike. They are very aggressive species and should be kept solitary or in pairs as the dominant male will usually terrorize and end up killing the sub-dominant "competition". It's possible to keep one individual with other aggressive tank mates (that will not eat them for lunch), but they should not resemble the Cylinder Cichlid in any way. The Cylinder Cichlid is a predatory carnivore and will feed on tiny invertebrates, plankton, and aquatic insects found among the rocks in their natural environment. In the aquarium their diet should consist of a variety of live, frozen, and freeze-dried bloodworms, daphnia, plankton, brine shrimp, and mysis shrimp, as well as vitamin-enriched and/or Spirulina-based flake foods and pellets. Feed what will be consumed in a few minutes, one to two times daily. Cylinder Cichlids are considered to be "substrate spawners", but they continually prove otherwise by utilizing caves; the female will lay her eggs in a cave (generally 50-200) and the male with fertilize them soon afterwards; the female will defend and care for the eggs while the male defends the territory. The eggs will hatch in about 10 days and free-swimming fry will start to venture out on their own a week later. The fry can be fed and raised on Artemia nauplii, baby brine shrimp, and crushed flake food.
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Fairy Cichlid
(Neolamprologus brichardi) Easy Semi-aggressive 4" 55 gallons 76-82° F, pH 8.5-9.5, KH 15-25 Carnivore Lake Tanganyika Cichlidae African Cichlid Cichlid-African The Fairy Cichlid is an elegant fish through appearance and motions alike; endemic to Lake Tanganyika, this graceful species is sure to be a center of attention in any Tanganyika aquarium. Also called the Princess Cichlid as well as the Princess of Burundi, this beautiful fish has long filaments extending from all but its pectoral fins (resembling streamers), giving it a graceful appearance which is how it earned its nickname. The Fairy Cichlid also has a striking, metallic-blue pattern, one black blotch and one smaller, yellow-orange blotch (above the black one) at the edge of its operculum in addition to dark bar angled from the eye to the black blotch previously mentioned. The Fairy Cichlid is quite popular and is usually available through online vendors; that can be special ordered if they aren't immediately available locally. The Fairy Cichlid requires an aquarium of 55 gallons or more and should be housed in a Tanganyika biotope system: A sand/crushed coral substrate with rock rubble, plenty of rocks around the tank creating multiple caves and crevices used as hiding places and areas to explore (it's a good idea to gently "twist" the base rocks into the substrate until they bottom out on the aquarium, preventing disaster when various fish decide that they want to dig around them). Plenty of open swimming space is required and should be considered when setting up the rocks in a Tanganyika system; decent water movement is also recommended as it will benefit both the fish any live plants that are utilized. Plants are appreciated as long as they are species' that can be attached to and will grow on rock surfaces (i.e., African Water Ferns and Anubias species' are perfect for the task) as Fairy Cichlids are notorious diggers. They can be housed with other species, but it's recommended that they are only other Tanganyika cichlids and that the other tank mates be larger then they are as they can become fiercely aggressive towards other species when they are breeding and protecting their young. Ideally they should be raised on their own. The Fairy Cichlid is a carnivore and feeds on invertebrates, small crustaceans and plankton from among rocky cover in their natural environment. In the aquarium their diet should consist of a variety of live, frozen, and freeze-dried bloodworms, daphnia, plankton, brine shrimp, and mysis shrimp, as well as vitamin-enriched flake foods and pellets. Feed what will be consumed in a few minutes, one to two times daily. Fairy Cichlids are substrate spawners and the only known African species to use a collective nursery where the "whole family" will always participate in the rearing of new offspring (adults, sub-adults, and juveniles alike). They are also the only known species that schools in addition to substrate-spawning. The female will lay her eggs in a cave and the male with fertilize them soon afterwards; the females will care for the eggs while the males and the entire extended family defends the territory and helps out where they can. The fry can be fed and raised on Artemia nauplii, baby brine shrimp, and crushed flake food.
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Convict Julie
(Julidochromis regani) Easy Peaceful 5" 55 gallons 76-82° F, pH 8.5-9.5, KH 15-25 Omnivore Lake Tanganyika Cichlidae African Cichlid Cichlid-African Endemic to Lake Tanganyika, the Convict Julie is a rather timid and peaceful species that can be kept in groups without much aggression. They are beautiful fish with contrasting horizontal lines and marbling of white, browns, and pale to brilliant yellows with caudal and dorsal fins having blue edges while their pectoral and pelvic fins tend to be a translucent yellow coloration. Convict Julies are a good choice for beginners just getting into the hobby as well as the more advanced aquarists; they are hardy, active, and attractive fish that doesn't cause a lot of trouble. Established in the hobby and a popular species, they are readily available through online and local sources, but are in high demand and certain specimens can fetch a high price. Convict Julies should be housed in an aquarium of 55 gallons or more and be provided with a fine sand substrate. They should also be provided with plenty of rock formations and live plants for hiding places and shelter similar to their natural environment (this will help fry survive if breeding is of interest); driftwood can also be used and would provide a good medium for certain African plants that have no problem adhering to various surfaces. The Convict Julie prefers good water movement and enough space to swim around freely without having to turn immediately turn around. They are a relatively peaceful and can be housed with a variety of other tank mates, although they should not be kept with the extremely aggressive species. The Convict Julie is omnivorous and feeds on invertebrates, insect larvae, mollusks, and crustaceans among the aufwuchs in their natural environment. In the aquarium their diet should consist of a variety of live, frozen, and freeze-dried bloodworms, daphnia, plankton, brine shrimp, and mysis shrimp, as well as vitamin-enriched flake foods and pellets. Feed what will be consumed in a few minutes, one to two times daily. Convict Julies are cave spawners. The female will lay her eggs in a cave and the male with fertilize them soon afterwards; the female will defend and care for the eggs while the male patrols their territory. The fry can be fed and raised on Artemia nauplii.
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Caudopunctatus Cichlid
(Neolamprologus caudopunctatus) Easy Aggressive 4" 30 gallons 72-82° F, KH 10-20, pH 7.8-9.0 Carnivore Lake Tanganyika Cichlidae African Cichlid Cichlid-African Caudopunctatus Cichlids are a dwarf species of Cichlid found in Africa's Lake Tanganyika. They are found living very near to the coast line, usually in depths of water of six feet or less. They move about the coastal shallows along the sandy bottom moving between the rocks and shells in search of small crustaceans on which to prey. While they spend much of their time in close proximity to rocks or shells, they do this for protection and are not "true" shell dwellers that will live inside of a shell. N. caudopunctatus is a monomorphic species as there are very few distinguishing traits between males and females. However, as adults the males will attain about 1 more inch in length than females which helps tell adult specimens apart. Another distinguishing trait is the higher level of aggression shown by males than females, with the exception of when the female is tending to eggs or newly hatched fry. Caudopunctatus Cichlids make very interesting aquarium specimens as they are very active and will spend their time sculpting the substrate, patrolling the caves and crevices of the aquarium and overall being fun to watch. As African Cichlids go, they are not too aggressive and will do well with similarly sized tank mates of similar disposition. The ideal aquarium setup for N. Caudopunctatus should have a sandy substrate and plenty of rocks, shells, caves and crevices for them to explore and seek shelter in when threatened. A minimum aquarium size of 30 gallons is recommended, with a larger aquarium required for many individuals or if kept with other African cichlid species, so that they can all establish a suitable amount of territory and reduce fighting that occurs with overcrowding. Mixing aragonite and/or keeping plenty of shells in the aquarium with help buffer the pH and alkalinity which will help keep the water chemistry close to their native environment. In nature, Caudopunctatus Cichlids diet consists primarily of small invertebrates and zooplankton. Hobbyists should feed them a varied diet of Mysis & Brine shrimp, Cyclopeeze, blood worms and high quality meaty flaked & pellet foods. It is best to provide multiple varieties of foodstuffs to help insure that the fish receives a balanced diet, which helps them maintain a strong immune system. Feedings should consist of amounts of food that the fish will consume within a few minutes fed multiple times per day. Caudopunctatus Cichlids will breed within the aquarium environment if provided proper water chemistry, a sandy substrate, and some type of suitable aqua-scaping like rocks, shells, sinking root/driftwood or flowerpots. A mating pair of Caudopunctatus Cichlids will find a secluded location within the tank near a rock, shell or flowerpot to excavate a small nest in the substrate by creating semi-circular area at the base of their spawning site. The female will attach the eggs to the bottom of the rock, shell or flowerpot, where the male will fertilize the eggs then be driven off by the female. A batch of around 40 to 60 fry will hatch in about 72 hours and will become free-swimming in about 8 to 10 days. During this time the mother will look after them and attack any fish who intrude on their nesting site. The fry should be fed their own food designed for fry, including Daphnia, Cyclop-eeze, or freshly hatched Brine Shrimp. Crushed flake food is accepted after about two weeks of development.
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Frontosa Cichlid
(Cyphotilapia frontosa) Moderate Semi-Aggressive 14" 75 gallons 72-82° F, KH 10-20, pH 7.8-9.0 Carnivore Lake Tanganyika Cichlidae African Cichlid Cichlid-African Often regarded as a "showpiece" species the Frontosa Cichlid of Lake Tanganyika is a truly impressive specimen that has both great coloration and impressive body size & shape with elaborate fins. Frontosa Cichlids were originally introduced into the hobby because of their attractive appearance. However, they have become even more popular as hobbyists have learned that they have great personalities, with an almost "dog" like quality that has helped to endear them to hobbyists even more. While this species is originally from the deeper areas of Lake Tanganyika, specimens found within the aquarium hobby these days are mostly from captive breeding programs that have been successfully breeding the Frontosa Cichlid for some time. Successful captive breeding programs are important to this and many other species as pressure from aquarium hobbyist collectors and local fisherman catching them for the food supply puts far too great a strain on their native populations. Frontosa Cichlids generally have a white or light blue body with either 6 or 7 black vertical bars along each side. As adults, they develop a large cephalic hump on the front of their head which is typically more pronounced on the male than the female. This hump is actually a large fat deposit that rests atop a dorsal muscle that tends to extend forward. The hump develops and increases in size with age and is usually a sign of sexual fecundity. Their fins also become more elaborate with age, which makes a mature Frontosa a very impressive sight as the combination of their large size, attractive coloration and elaborate fins make them a truly impressive sight to behold. Frontosa Cichlids live relatively long (25 plus years) sedentary lifestyles in nature as they do not expend much energy while slowly swimming about or hunting. Frontosa utilize a unique trait that allows them to see well in darkness, which allows them to prey on smaller fish species while they sleep near the lake bottom. Frontosa simply swim along slowly and feast on the smaller fish as they sleep. They are not overly aggressive within the aquarium environment, but can be a little territorial. They can be kept with most any species of African Cichlid that is not small enough to be considered as food. They will appreciate a sandy or partially sandy substrate along with some rocky formations in order to simulate their natural surroundings. While some rocks are much appreciated by the Frontosa Cichlid to give them a sense of security, too many rocky structures can be a problem as Frontosa are somewhat clumsy swimmers that need plenty of open space to move about. In nature Frontosa Cichlids live in large groups and prefer to live in groups in the aquarium as well. While one specimen can be kept singularly, it is more ideal to keep them in groups of 4 or more individuals. The best group makeup would be to have 3 females per male and between 4 to 8 specimens for the average larger aquarium. In the aquarium environment, Frontosa Cichlids should be fed a variety of meaty foods including: small feeder fish (live or frozen), shrimp, krill, and worms. Larger meaty pellets are also a good choice, but flake foods should only be fed to juveniles, as adult specimens will likely ignore them.
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Pearly Calvus
(Altolamprologus calvus) Easy Semi-Aggressive 6" 20 gallons 75-80° F, pH 7.8-9.0, GH 12-20, KH 14-20 Carnivore Lake Tanganyika Cichlidae African Cichlid Cichlid-African Altolamprologus calvus (Pearly Calvus) have become very popular with African Cichlid owners as they have a slender aggressive body shape, steep sloping forehead with a large mouth and attractive coloration with stripes on the head and collar region and brilliant white spots on the posterior two-thirds of the their sides, all this combined with their easy going temperament make them a good choice for a variety of aquarium setups. Pearly Calvus are known for being slow growers and can take over two years to reach their maximum size of 6 inches for males and 4 inches for females. They are found in eastern parts of Lake Tanganyikan around rocky outcrops and other areas with plenty of rock caves and crevices. There are several morphological varieties of Pearly Calvus including: black, white, yellow, and even zebra, which looks a lot like a white version of Alto. compressiceps. Pearly Calvus make a great addition to most any Tanganyikan community setup, except for setups with much smaller fishes or shellfish, as these would most likely become a meal. They can also be kept with many of the fishes from Lakes Malawi and Victoria, provided the latter also require a high protein diet. Pearly Calvus require an aquarium with plenty of rocks forming caves and rock ledges and crevices. When initially added to the aquarium, it is not unusual for this species to hide in the rocks most of the time. However, over time they will adapt to their new environment and spend most of their time in the lower areas of the aquarium along the substrate and lower rocky areas. It is important to not overfeed the aquarium during this period trying to get food to the Calvus, they will emerge from their rock cave when they are ready and will begin eating hardily at that time. This mimics there behavior in the wild where they spend their time along the substrate looking for shellfish and other foodstuffs to scoop up from the ground or from within rock caves. They are quite peaceful in the aquarium and will not fight with other fish species including similar sized species as well. While they have a good temperament for a community cichlid aquarium, they are very capable of defending themselves and will use their thick scales as both a strong defense and for inflicting damage on their attacker. Unlike many other African Cichlid species, Pearly Calvus are not territorial and will coexist with other species or others of their own kind. Pearly Calvus are hardy eaters (once established) and will readily take most any type of high-protein meaty foods including: brine shrimp, meaty pellets, cichlid flakes and live foods. They will also consume fish species that are much smaller than themselves and will eat shellfish and crustaceans. Pearly Calvus are substrate spawners and it is not uncommon to miss that they have spawned as they are very secretive spawners. Calvus like to spawn in tight confines such as a rocky cave, deep rocky crevice, rock overhang, inside a shell or pot or any suitable area that the male of the species cannot enter. The male will release his milt at the entrance of the females spawning location and both the male and female will use their fins to fan the milt onto the eggs, which will be dropped on the substrate. A typical spawn for a younger pair will number 75 eggs while a mature breeding pair will number around 200 eggs, with females being able to spawn every 30 to 40 days. The fry are very slow growers and will need upwards of 9 months to reach approximately 1 inch in size, the male young will be about 1/3rd larger than the females. While it is possible to raise the fry in the parent aquarium, the survival rate will be increased drastically if the fry are moved to a grow-out tank with a seasoned sponge filter. The fry calvus are bottom huggers, thus for this reason, you will need to pay extra attention to water quality as extra food can quickly foul the substrate. A mixture of Cyclops-eeze, Hikari First Start, and finely ground earthworm and brine shrimp flakes should provide the necessary nutrition with as little excess as possible. Partial weekly water changes will help insure that proper water conditions are maintained.
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