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Thin Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar
1 like Tetras
(Myleus schomburgkii var. thin bar) Easy Peaceful 8" 75 gallons 75-82° F, KH 4-8, pH 5.0-7.0 Herbivore South America, Amazon, Captive bred Characidae Tetras Community The Thin Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar (Myleus schomburgkii var. thin bar) is a South American species closely related to both Piranha and Pacu, and are native to same South American rivers, streams and tributaries. There a number of subspecies of Metynnis who vary in coloration and pattern based on their origins, some common species of Silver Dollar include: Silver dollar (Metynnis argenteus), Striped silver dollar (Metynnis fasciatus), Spotted Silver Dollar (Metynnis lippincottianus), Red-spot Silver Dollar (Metynnis luna), Speckled silver dollar (Metynnis maculatus), Wide Bar Silver Dollar (Myleus schomburgkii) and Red Hook & Blue Hook Silver Dollars. Thin Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar are available within the aquarium hobby with moderate regularity. They are often sold at a size of around 1.5 to 2 inches in length and will generally grow upwards of 8 inches in larger aquariums, with females sometimes being slightly smaller and males sometimes slightly larger. They are very popular due to their bright silver coloration, black bar pattern, unique rounded body shape and their active schooling swim style. Alls species of Silver Dollars prefer to swim in medium to large schools and are generally found in the middle to upper regions of the water column within the aquarium. Ideally they should be kept with a minimum of six individuals, which will allow them to school and provide them a sense of security. In their native habitat Thin Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollars congregate in large schools of fish, where they swim throughout the heavily vegetated shorelines of the numerous rivers and river tributaries of the Amazon basin and northern portions of South America in search of aquatic plant life and algae on which to feed. The slender disc like body of the Silver Dollar allows them to move easily throughout both the dense vegetation of the river shoreline and the stronger water currents found in deeper rivers and tributaries. While in nature their brilliant silver coloration and schooling are used as defense mechanism that helps them to avoid being eaten by predators, hobbyists covet Silver Dollars for the brilliant coloration and active swimming style, which looks amazing in aquarium environments ranging from Amazon biotope aquariums to tropical community aquariums. Like other South American fish species whom originate from river habitats, the Thin Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar prefers warm, soft acidic to neutral water conditions, plenty of moderate or laminar water flow and low to moderate levels of nitrate. As an active swimming and schooling species, they will do best in aquariums that provide plenty of horizontal swimming space. They will also greatly appreciate aquarium decor that mimics their native environment, thus a tank with plenty of plants, either live or fake, combined with driftwood or wood root and open swimming areas will go a long way toward giving them a comfortable and secure feeling aquarium environment. It should be noted that they will consume many types of live plants, especially stem plants. Silver Dollar species in general are often referred to as underwater goats due to their propensity to devour plant matter; however, they most often will not consume Anubias species, Java Fern and floating plants like Hyacinth, Water Sprite and Water Lettuce. Feeding them supplemental feedings of romaine or green leaf lettuce will both provide them valuable nutrition and help to reduce their grazing on decorative aquatic plants growing within the aquarium. However, at the end of the day hobbyists looking to keep live plants with any species of Silver Dollar fish will need to do some research on which plant species can be kept safely with this species and go through some trial and error before finding a situation that works. Their moderately large size and need to be kept in groups of 6 or more individuals means that they need to be housed in a relatively large aquarium of at least 90 gallons or more. Their size also allows them to be housed with a wide variety of tank mates including many peaceful community species, semi-aggressive community species and even many species of Cichlids as well. At an adult size of around 8 inches, the Thin Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar will consume very small fish species like Ember Tetra or smaller Neon Tetra; however, they are not aggressive towards tank mates larger than these very small Tetra species or similar sized fish. They also work well as dither fish in community Cichlid aquariums containing peaceful to semi-aggressive Cichlid species. The Thin Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar is an omnivore, but the majority of its diet in nature consists of a variety of plant material and algae. While their diet in nature is more heavily based on plants, they will consume a variety of meaty items including small fish, snails, insects and small crustaceans should the opportunity arise. Hobbyists should make sure that the majority of their diet is plant based in order to provide them with correct vitamins and minerals that they require for good health. It is best to feed a variety of flake, small pellet, freeze-dried or frozen food designed for freshwater herbivores, a couple times a day. Be careful when keeping any species of Silver Dollars with live plants or very small fish like Neon Tetra, as they will consume certain plants and fish small enough to fit in their mouths. Hobbyists interested in breeding Thin Bar Schomburgkii generally begin with a small group of juvenile fish, roughly 6 to 8 individuals. As the fish mature a male will generally establish himself as the dominant fish within the group and exhibit mating behavior towards a chosen female. This established pair can then be separated from the group and kept in a separate aquarium that is maintained with ideal breeding conditions, which include: warm 80 to 82° temperature, soft slightly acidic water (KH 4-8), dim or diffused lighting, vegetation (real or fake) and lastly a smooth rock, slate or submerged wood on which to lay eggs. Females will lay upwards of 1500 to 2000 eggs somewhere on the bottom of the tank or on piece of hard scape. They fry will hatch within three days and after approximately a week they will be free swimming and able to eat fine foods such as commercially prepared fry food, finely-crushed flake food or freshly-hatched brine shrimp. Thin Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollars are good about not eating their own eggs or fry, but can be removed once the eggs hatch as well, which should generally make it easier to raise the fry without having to also contend with larger adult fish.
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Wide Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar
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(Myleus schomburgkii var. wide bar) Easy Semi-aggressive 12" 125 gallons 72-82° F, KH 4-8, pH 5.0-7.0 Omnivore Amazon River Basin, Venezuela, Peru & Brazil Characidae Tetras Larger Community / New World Cichlid The Wide Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar (Myleus schomburgkii var. wide bar) is a South American species closely related to both Piranha and Pacu, and are native to same South American rivers, streams and tributaries. There a number of subspecies of Metynnis who vary in coloration and pattern based on their origins, some common species of Silver Dollar include: Silver dollar (Metynnis argenteus), Striped silver dollar (Metynnis fasciatus), Spotted Silver Dollar (Metynnis lippincottianus), Red-spot Silver Dollar (Metynnis luna), Speckled silver dollar (Metynnis maculatus), Wide Bar Silver Dollar (Myleus schomburgkii var. wide bar) and Thin Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar (Myleus schomburgkii var. thin bar). Wide Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar are available within the aquarium hobby with moderate regularity. They are often sold at a size of around 2 inches in length and will generally grow upwards of 12 inches in larger aquariums, with females sometimes being slightly smaller and males sometimes slightly larger. They are very popular due to their bright silver coloration, black bar pattern, unique rounded body shape and their active schooling swim style. All species of Silver Dollars prefer to swim in medium to large schools and are generally found in the middle to upper regions of the water column within the aquarium. Ideally they should be kept with a minimum of six individuals, which will allow them to school and provide them a sense of security. In their native habitat Wide Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollars congregate in large schools of fish, where they swim throughout the heavily vegetated shorelines of the numerous streams and river tributaries of the Amazon basin and northern portions of South America in search of aquatic plant life and algae on which to feed. The slender disc like body of the Silver Dollar allows them to move easily throughout both the dense vegetation of the river shoreline and the stronger water currents found in deeper rivers and tributaries. While in nature their brilliant silver coloration and schooling are used as defense mechanism that helps them to avoid being eaten by predators, hobbyists covet Silver Dollars for the brilliant coloration and active swimming style, which looks amazing in aquarium environments ranging from Amazon biotope aquariums to tropical community aquariums. Like other South American fish species whom originate from river habitats, the Wide Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar prefers warm, soft acidic to neutral water conditions, plenty of moderate or laminar water flow and low to moderate levels of nitrate. As an active swimming and schooling species, they will do best in aquariums that provide plenty of horizontal swimming space. They will also greatly appreciate aquarium decor that mimics their native environment, thus a tank with plenty of plants, either live or fake, combined with driftwood or wood root and open swimming areas will go a long way toward giving them a comfortable and secure feeling aquarium environment. It should be noted that they will consume many types of live plants, especially stem plants. Silver Dollar species in general are often referred to as underwater goats due to their propensity to devour plant matter; however, they most often will not consume Anubias species, Java Fern and floating plants like Hyacinth, Water Sprite and Water Lettuce. Feeding them supplemental feedings of romaine or green leaf lettuce will both provide them valuable nutrition and help to reduce their grazing on decorative aquatic plants growing within the aquarium. However, at the end of the day hobbyists looking to keep live plants with any species of Silver Dollar fish will need to do some research on which plant species can be kept safely with this species and go through some trial and error before finding a situation that works. Their larger size and need to be kept in groups of 6 or more individuals means that they need to be housed in a relatively large aquarium of at least 125 gallons or more. Their larger size also allows them to be housed with a wide variety of tank mates including many larger peaceful community species, semi-aggressive community species and even many species of Cichlids and Rays as well. At an adult size of around 12 inches, the Wide Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar will consume very small fish species like small Tetra or Barbs; however, they are not aggressive towards tank mates larger than these very small Tetra species or similar sized fish. They also work well as dither fish in community Cichlid aquariums containing peaceful to semi-aggressive Cichlid species. The Wide Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollar is an omnivore, but the majority of its diet in nature consists of a variety of plant material and fruits dropped from trees. While their diet in nature is more heavily based on plants and fruits, they will consume a variety of meaty items including small fish, snails, insects and small crustaceans should the opportunity arise. Hobbyists should make sure that the majority of their diet is plant based in order to provide them with correct vitamins and minerals that they require for good health. It is best to feed a variety of flake, small pellet, freeze-dried or frozen food designed for freshwater herbivores, a couple times a day. Be careful when keeping any species of Silver Dollars with live plants or very small fish like Neon Tetra, as they will consume certain plants and fish small enough to fit in their mouths. Hobbyists interested in breeding Wide Bar Schomburgkii generally begin with a small group of juvenile fish, roughly 6 to 8 individuals. As the fish mature a male will generally establish himself as the dominant fish within the group and exhibit mating behavior towards a chosen female. This established pair can then be separated from the group and kept in a separate aquarium that is maintained with ideal breeding conditions, which include: warm 80 to 82° temperature, soft slightly acidic water (KH 4-8), dim or diffused lighting, vegetation (real or fake) and lastly a smooth rock, slate or submerged wood on which to lay eggs. Females will lay upwards of 1500 to 2000 eggs somewhere on the bottom of the tank or on piece of hard scape. They fry will hatch within three days and after approximately a week they will be free swimming and able to eat fine foods such as commercially prepared fry food, finely-crushed flake food or freshly-hatched brine shrimp. Wide Bar Schomburgkii Silver Dollars are good about not eating their own eggs or fry, but can be removed once the eggs hatch as well, which should generally make it easier to raise the fry without having to also contend with larger adult fish.
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Von Rio Flame Tetra
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(Hyphessobrycon flammeus) Easy Peaceful 1.5" 10 gallons 70-84° F, KH 3-10, pH 5.5-7.5 Omnivore South America, Eastern Brazil Characidae Tetras Community The Von Rio Flame Tetra is commonly found within the aquarium hobby under the names Von Rio Tetra, Von Rio Flame Tetra, Flame Tetra, Fire Tetra, Rio Tetra, Red Tetra or simply under their scientific name Hyphessobrycon flammeus. Despite the name the fish remains the same, and this case the fish is a beautiful Tetra species that is at home in a variety of tropical community or planted aquariums. Schools of Von Rio Flame Tetra will even do well when kept with peaceful Cichlid species like Angelfish, Severum, Acara or other similar Cichlid species. Von Rio Tetra originate from small coastal river tributaries, creeks and backwaters of Eastern Brazil around Rio de Janeiro and surrounding areas. They inhabit slow moving creeks, backwaters and smaller river tributaries. They live in schools of individuals and move about through the submerged vegetation looking for small worms, crustaceans and insect larvae on which to feed. Living in large schools and staying close to submerged root and plants affords them protection from a variety of larger predators. Von Rio Tetra are a peaceful species who do well in most tropical community aquarium and planted aquarium setups; however, they are more boisterous than many of the smaller Tetra species like Neon Tetra or Ember Tetra. They prefer to live in schools of individuals with at least 6 or more individuals. They are active swimmers who dart about more so than swim and will nip at each other in a social manner. Keeping them in larger schools helps to eliminate any aggression, provides them a sense of security and helps to increase their red coloration as the males and females compete for one anothers attention. The ideal tank for keeping Von Rio Tetra will have plenty of live or ornamental plants, driftwood and areas of diffused lighting. Either floating plants or large pieces of driftwood can be used to create areas in the tank that have diffused lighting, which will allow the them to retreat from the bright aquarium lights when they feel threatened. They will appreciate consistent gentle water flow and warm, slightly acidic water conditions. A small group of Von Rio Tetra will do fine in an aquarium of 2o to 30 gallons, with a larger group of adult specimens needing at least 40 to 50 gallons or more to thrive. In addition to areas of plants and submerged wood, Von Rio Tetra need plenty of open swimming room and plenty of water movement in order to replicate their native river habitat. Wild Von Rio Tetra feed on a wide variety of foods including: small crustaceans, small worms, algae, small insects and insect larvae. They are very hardy feeders and will quickly adjust to commercial aquarium foods. Hobbyists should feed a variety of foods comprised of flake, frozen and freeze-dried foods designed for freshwater tropical omnivores. A mix of foods will help ensure that they receive all the vitamins and minerals that they need to maintain a healthy immune system. Von Rio Tetra are egg layers who reach sexual maturity at around 6 months of age. Hobbyists looking to breed them will want to establish a breeding group of 10 to 16 fish equally split between males and females. The breeding group should be kept in an aquarium in the 10 to 29 gallon range, with either live plants or a spawning mop in order to give them a place to deposit their eggs in a similar fashion as they would in nature. In their natural habitat the Von Rio Tetra would while clasped together perform a roll-over breeding process in moderately dense vegetation in order to both deposit their eggs and fertilize them. This style of spawning works best in vegetation or spawning material that isn't too dense, as the fish need to be able to move about within the plants or spawning mop. The tank should have more subdued lighting and the plants or spawning mops spread out in different areas of the tank in order to give the fish options on where to lay their eggs. Feedings should be kept small and consist of high quality frozen foods or live foods. Aquarium filtration for the breeding aquarium should consist of either a air powered sponge filter or a small power filter with a sponge over the intake tube. Lastly, the ideal water parameters for stimulating breeding in Von Rio Tetra is water that is soft and acidic, a pH around 5.5 to 6.5 and a water temperature between 80° F and 84° F. After the fish have successfully spawned the adult fish should be removed from the breeding aquarium so that they do not eat the eggs or the fry when the hatch. The eggs will hatch within 24 to 36 hours, with the fry becoming free swimming in 3 to 4 days. The young fry are sensitive to bright lighting and poor water conditions, thus lower lighting and daily 25% partial water changes will greatly increase the chance of the fry reaching maturity. Be sure to use the water change process as an opportunity to remove any leftover foods that accumulate on the bottom of the aquarium so that they do not degrade the water quality. New born fry should be fed micro foods like infusoria, brine shrimp nauplii or other similar items designed for newly hatched fry. The fry grow rapidly and will reach adulthood by 6 months of age, during which time the foods fed to them should increase in size as the fish grow. Baby brine, crushed flake foods or mico-worms make excellent food choices for young fish until they can eat traditional flake, frozen and freeze-dried foods.
Silver Dollar
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(Metynnis sp.) Easy Peaceful 6" 30 gallons 75-82° F, KH 4-8, pH 5.0-7.0 Herbivore South America, Amazon, Captive bred Characidae Tetras Community The Silver Dollar (Metynnis sp.) fish is a South American species closely related to both Piranha and Pacu, and are native to same South American rivers, streams and tributaries. There a number of subspecies of Metynnis who vary in coloration and pattern based on their origins, some common species of Silver Dollar include: Silver dollar (Metynnis argenteus), Striped silver dollar (Metynnis fasciatus), Spotted silver dollar (Metynnis lippincottianus), Red-spot silver dollar (Metynnis luna), Speckled silver dollar (Metynnis maculatus), Black-barred silver dollar (Myleus schomburgkii) and Red hook silver dollar (Myloplus rubripinnis). They have been available within the aquarium hobby since the origins of the hobby, but have remained very popular due to their bright silver coloration, unique rounded body shape and their active schooling swim style. Silver Dollars prefer to swim in medium to large schools and are generally found in the middle to upper regions of the water column within the aquarium. Ideally they should be kept with a minimum of six individuals, which will allow them to school and provide them a sense of security. In their native habitat Silver Dollars congregate in large schools of fish, where they swim throughout the heavily vegetated shorelines of the numerous streams and river tributaries of the Amazon basin and northern portions of South America in search of aquatic plant life and algae on which to feed. The slender disc like body of the Silver Dollar allows them to move easily throughout both the dense vegetation of the river shoreline and the stronger water currents found in deeper rivers and tributaries. While in nature their brilliant silver coloration and schooling are used as defense mechanism that helps them to avoid being eaten by predators, hobbyists covet Silver Dollars for the brilliant coloration and active swimming style, which looks amazing in aquarium environments ranging from Amazon biotope aquariums to tropical community aquariums. Like other South American fish species whom originate from river habitats, the Silver Dollar prefers warm, soft acidic to neutral water conditions, plenty of moderate or laminar water flow and low to moderate levels of nitrate. As an active swimming and schooling species, Silver Dollars will do best in aquariums that provide plenty of horizontal swimming space. They will also greatly appreciate aquarium decor that mimics their native environment, thus a tank with plenty of plants, either live or fake, combined with driftwood or wood root and open swimming areas will go a long way toward giving the Silver Dollar a comfortable and secure feeling aquarium environment. Additionally, hobbyists should really keep this species in groups of at least 5 individuals, as schooling species like the Silver Dollar do much better in groups as opposed to single individuals or pairs. Hobbyists looking to keep live plants with Silver Dollar fish will need to do some research on which plant species can be kept safely with this species without being consumed. Silver Dollars are known to readily consume many varieties of aquatic plant life and make short work of plants that they find appetizing. Their larger size allows them to be housed with a wide variety of tank mates including other peaceful community species, semi-aggressive community species and even many species of Cichlids as well. At an adult size of around six inches, the Silver Dollar will consume very small fish species like Ember Tetra or smaller Neon Tetra; however, they are not aggressive towards tank mates larger than these very small Tetra species. They can also be kept as dither fish in community Cichlid aquariums containing peaceful to semi-aggressive Cichlid species. The Silver Dollar is a herbivore as the majority of its diet in nature consists of plant material and algae. However, they will consume a variety of meaty items, insects and small crustaceans should the opportunity arise. Hobbyists should make sure that the majority of their diet is plant based in order to provide them with correct vitamins and minerals that they require for good health. It is best to feed a variety of flake, small pellet, freeze-dried or frozen food designed for freshwater herbivores, a couple times a day. Be careful when keeping Silver Dollars with live plants or very small fish like young Neon Tetra, as they will consume certain plants and fish small enough to fit in their mouths. Hobbyists interested in breeding Silver Dollars generally begin with a small group of juvenile fish, roughly 6 to 8 individuals. As the fish mature a male will generally establish himself as the dominant fish within the group and exhibit mating behavior towards a chosen female. This established pair can then be separated from the group and kept in a separate aquarium that is maintained with ideal breeding conditions, which include: warm 80 to 82° temperature, soft slightly acidic water (KH 4-8), dim or diffused lighting, vegetation (real or fake) and lastly a smooth rock, slate or submerged wood on which to lay eggs. Females will lay upwards of 1500 to 2000 eggs somewhere on the bottom of the tank or on piece of hard scape. They fry will hatch within three days and after approximately a week they will be free swimming and able to eat fine foods such as commercially prepared fry food, finely-crushed flake food or freshly-hatched brine shrimp. Silver Dollars are good about not eating their own eggs or fry, but can be removed once the eggs hatch as well, which should generally make it easier to raise the fry without having to also contend with larger adult fish.
Ember Tetra
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(Hyphessobrycon amandae) Easy Peaceful 1" 10 gallons 74-80° F, dGH 5-17, pH 5.0-7.0 Omnivore Brazil, Araguaia River basin Characidae Tetras Community Ember Tetra (Hyphessobrycon amandae) are native to the Araguaia River basin, which is one of the major rivers of Brazil, with a large number of tributaries and a total length of over 2,600 kilometers. While the Araguaia River is well known for its large water volume and almost the entire length of the river being navigable year round, Ember Tetra are found not in the main river but in the small tributaries and drainage ditches that feed the river. The minor tributaries, backwaters and flooded areas in which the Ember Tetra calls home are typically characterized by shallow water, soft acidic water, sand or sand / dirt mix substrate and plenty of fallen leaves and branches. In larger tributaries they will be found living near the river banks in the areas of more dense vegetation, where they can evade larger predators and feed on small invertebrates and insect larvae. At an adult length of only 2 cm (1 inch), Ember Tetra school together in groups as a form of protection. Living in schools has caused the Ember Tetra to develop a well formed social hierarchy and desire to live in groups of their own kind. Hobbyists should always consider the natural habitat, social requirements and tank mate compatibility when choosing fish for their aquarium. The small size of the Ember Tetra makes it suitable for smaller aquariums, 10 gallon or larger; however, their small size also means that hobbyists must maintain correct water parameters, provide an environment similar to their native habitat and choose tank mates carefully. Due to this fishes small size and because they are generally housed in smaller aquariums, they are more susceptible to adverse reactions to fluctuations in water chemistry that a larger fish might be able to better tolerate. Their small size also makes the Ember Tetra more easy to stress if they are not provided an aquarium environment that provides them with plenty of places to retreat to if they feel threatened. Hobbyists should keep Ember Tetra in groups of at least 8 to 10 individuals and provide an aquarium environment that closes matches their native habitat, while also giving them plenty of hiding places in the form of vegetation, driftwood or rocky caves or crevices. Proper tank mates also play a critical role in successfully keeping Ember Tetra in the home aquarium. Ember Tetra can easily be intimidated and stressed by boisterous fish species similar to Tiger Barbs or by larger more aggressive fish species like many Cichlid species found within community aquariums. Suitable tank mates will be other small Tetra, Barbs, Rasbora or larger peaceful species like Discus. The ideal aquarium setup for keeping Ember Tetra will include a sand substrate, smaller diameter gravel substrate or mix of the two, plenty of vegetation consisting of either live or synthetic plants and areas of rocky formations and/or driftwood or wood root. Water conditions should be on the warmer side, generally 76 to 80 degrees F with a stable pH between 5.0 to 7.0 and acidic water hardness of dGH 5-17. They can tolerate other water conditions if they are acclimated slowly and are not subjected to quick fluctuations in either water temperature or chemistry. Lastly, Ember Tetra will appreciate and aquarium environment with gentle, varied water flow that provides water movement throughout the aquarium, while not creating strong or constant water currents. Being a micro predator by nature, the Ember Tetra is accustomed to feeding on small organisms like small insects, larvae, small crustaceans and worms. However, they will quickly adjust to commercial based flake, freeze-dried or pellet foods designed for tropical community aquarium fish. They can be fed bloodworms, tubifex worms or other similar fair as a treat or supplementation to their staple diet. Varying their diet will help ensure that they receive all the vitamins and minerals that they need to maintain a healthy immune system. Ideally they should be fed small meals that will be consumed within a few minutes, 2 to 3 times per day.
Cardinal Tetra
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(Paracheirodon axelrodi) Moderate Peaceful 2" 10 gallons 74-84° F, KH 2-6, pH 3.0-7.5 Omnivore Venezuela, Brazil, Amazon Characidae Tetras Community The Cardinal Tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi) originates from the rivers of Venezuela and Brazil, where they are found in a variety of river habitats ranging from slow-moving forest streams to minor river tributaries. Their native habitats also range from areas with substrates covered in leaves, branches and tree roots to areas with clear water, sandy substrates and dense growth of aquatic and bog plants. Despite still being collected in the wild, their immense popularity within the aquarium hobby has led to extensive breeding programs that breed large numbers of specimens for the commercial trade. Despite being very similar in both appearance and maintenance requirements as the Neon Tetra (Paracheirodon innesi), the Cardinal Tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi) is a separate Tetra species. Neon Tetras are a little smaller, usually a little cheaper, and typically a little hardier than their Cardinal Tetra cousins. Cardinals are a little more bold in appearance, mostly because they have more red on their lower sides. Both are schooling species that like to be in a group of at least six or more individuals. Mixed groups of Neons and Cardinals will also readily school together, with the bigger the school, the better they tend to look. Due to their small size, Cardinal Tetra can be comfortably housed in small aquariums and even nano tanks. However, they do best in schools of 8 or more individuals and aquariums of at least 20 to 30 gallons or more. As is the case with most small fish species, stable water parameters are very important. Quick fluctuations of water temperature, pH, etc. can shock the fish and cause them to be more susceptible to stress related diseases or even cause death. The ideal tank conditions for Cardinal Tetra will include: stable pH & water temperatures around 80° F, low to moderate water flow, plenty of both tall and ground cover vegetation, tree root or driftwood and peaceful community fish tank mates. The Cardinal Tetra is one of the most peaceful species available within the aquarium hobby. They do well in any peaceful community aquarium containing small to medium community fish species and non-predatory medium sized Cichlids. Larger Cardinal Tetra can typically be successfully kept with larger community species like Angelfish, Discus, Gourami and other similar species. Keys to successfully keeping Cardinal Tetra with larger community species include: keeping them in groups of eight or more individuals, providing plenty of vegetation or other suitable cover, providing adequate space in the aquarium (prevent over crowding) and keeping their larger tank mates well fed. In the wild Cardinal Tetra feed on a variety of items including: small invertebrates, small crustaceans, insect larvae, filamentous algae and other similar fare. Being an omnivore, hobbyists should provide a mix of algae, vegetable based and meaty foods. Quality commercial flake, freeze-dried or frozen foods make an excellent staple diet. Hobbyists should also mix in items like bloodworms, daphnia, baby brine, etc. in order to vary the diet and provide a balanced diet. It is best to feed small amounts of food 2 to 3 times per day and occasional abstain from feeding for a day or so from time to time.
Congo Tetra
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(Phenacogrammus interruptus) Moderate Peaceful 3" 30 gallons 74-84° F, KH 4-10, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore Congo, Zaire Alestidae Tetras Community Congo Tetra (Phenacogrammus interruptus) originate from the Congo River basin are of the Republic of Congo and Zaire. However, most Congo Tetra found within the aquarium hobby today are commercially bred on fish farms in Asia and parts of Europe. This is a testament to the ease at which this species has adapted to captivity and aquarium life in general. Today Congo Tetra have become a very popular aquarium fish species due to their beautiful coloration, active swimming style and ease of care. Congo Tetra are peaceful in nature and do well in most tropical community aquarium and planted aquarium setups; however, they are more boisterous than many other Tetra species. Their active swimming style is similar to that of a Tiger Barb, but without the fin nipping associated with many Barb species. At an adult size of about 3 inches in length, the Congo Tetra is also a little bit larger than many of the other Tetra species commonly found within the freshwater aquarium hobby. As with most smaller tropical fish species, the Congo Tetra lives in schools of individuals both for protection and for social reasons. Hobbyists will want to keep a group of at least 6 to 8 Congo Tetra (more being better if there is sufficient tank space), with a mix of 2 or 3 females to 1 male or keep all males. This will help eliminate any aggression between specimens that occurs from breeding and social group dominance. The ideal tank for keeping Congo Tetra will have plenty of live or ornamental plants, driftwood and areas of diffused lighting. Either floating plants or large pieces of driftwood can be used to create areas in the tank that have diffused lighting, which will allow the Congo Tetra to retreat from the bright aquarium lights when necessary. Young Congo Tetra or a mated pair will do fine in an aquarium of 30 gallons or more, with a group of adult specimens needing at least 55 to 75 gallons or more to thrive. In addition to areas of plants and submerged wood, Congo Tetra need plenty of open swimming room and plenty of water movement in order to replicate their native river habitat. Wild Congo Tetra feed on a wide variety of foods including: small crustaceans, small worms, algae, zooplankton, small insects and insect larvae. They are very hardy feeders and will quickly adjust to commercial aquarium foods. Hobbyists should feed a variety of foods comprised of flake, mini-pellet, frozen and freeze-dried foods designed for freshwater tropical omnivores. A mix of foods will help ensure that the Congo Tetra receives all the vitamins and minerals that they need to maintain a healthy immune system.
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Red Eye Tetra
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(Moenkhausia sanctaefilomene) Easy Peaceful 3" 30 gallons 72-80° F, KH 4-8, pH 6.0-8. Omnivore Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina Characidae Tetras Community Red Eye Tetra (Moenkhausia sanctaefilomene) originate from Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina, where they are found living in jungle streams and murky tributaries. Their native waters contain dense aquatic vegetation and have filtered sunlight from the jungle canopy above. Despite being found in abundance in their native habitat, Red Eye Tetra are typically farm raised for the aquarium hobby. Their popularity within the hobby and ease of breeding, it is much more commercially viable to raise them in large numbers on fish farms rather than to import them from the wild. At an adult size of about 3 inches in length, a peaceful disposition and tolerance for a wide range of water parameters, Red Eye Tetra are ideally suited for beginning hobbyists. Groups of Red Eye Tetra also make excellent addition to planted aquariums and all manner of tropical community aquariums. Since the Red Eye Tetra is a schooling species in the wild, they should also be housed in groups of at least 4 or more individuals in the aquarium environment as well. A group of Red Eye Tetra is much more visually impressive than a single individual, as their red and black accents are more noticeable when swimming in a tight group. Their peaceful nature, moderate size and overall hardiness make them well suited for any type of tropical freshwater aquarium setup. Red Eye Tetra will of course appreciate aquarium setups that contain some of the elements of their natural habitat. Some of these natural elements include: areas of filtered lighting, aquatic plants, drift wood, submerged root, sand or fine gravel substrate and moderate water currents. Red Eye Tetra will not bother smaller community fish species and can generally coexist with most all other community fish species found within the aquarium hobby. Red Eye Tetra should be fed a varied diet of quality commercial foods 2 or 3 times per day the amount of food they will consume within a few minutes. They are not picky eaters and will readily accept a wide variety of plant and animal based foods. They should readily accept quality flake, freeze-dried and small pellet foods, tubifex worms, blood worms, frozen foods, algae or plant based flakes and crisps, brine shrimp, mysis shrimp and a variety of other similar food items.
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Black Neon Tetra
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(Hyphessobrycon herbertaxelrodi) Easy Peaceful 1.5" 12 gallons 72-79° F, KH 4-8, pH 5.5-7.0 Omnivore Brazilian Amazon Characidae Tetras Community Black Neon Tetra (Hyphessobrycon herbertaxelrodi) originate from the smaller streams and tributaries of the Rio Paraguay drainage portion of the Brazilian Amazon. Due to their popularity and ease of breeding most if not all Black Neon Tetra found within the aquarium hobby are commercially bred at fish farms. Commercially bred Black Neon Tetra are very hardy and can tolerate a fairly wide range of aquarium conditions. Farm raised fish are also generally less expensive due to their large numbers being bred and help reduce pressure on wild fish populations. Black Neon Tetra are a mainstay in both planted aquariums and community aquariums, where they are typically kept in schools of individuals. They are suitable for beginning aquarium hobbyists and hobbyists with smaller nano style aquariums. Black Neon Tetra have a very peaceful disposition, thus they should be housed with other small to medium sized peaceful community species. They do best when housed in groups of 6 or more individuals in a well planted aquarium that emulates their natural Amazonian habitat. Ideal tank mates include: other Tetra, Hatchet Fish, Cory Cats, Rasbora, Gourami, peaceful Barb species and some smaller Cichlids like Rams Cichlids. The Black Neon Tetra will have a difficult time competing with boisterous species like many Barb species and Danio species for food and territory. Also do to their small adult size, the Black Neon Tetra is not well suited for aquariums with Angelfish or larger Shark or Catfish species who will often eat the sleeping Tetra during the nighttime hours. The natural river habitat of the Black Neon Tetra is comprised of slowly moving river tributaries that with leaf covered river bottoms, plenty of tree root structures, filtered light from the jungle canopy above and a soft sandy river substrate. The waters of their natural habitat are also stained a brown tea color from the fallen leaves of the jungle canopy above. Ideally aquariums housing Black Neon Tetra should have areas containing root structures, some vegetation, diffused lighting in some areas and low to moderate water currents. While this species can adapt to a variety of tropical community aquarium habitats, they should be provided with some key elements of their own natural habitat. Most importantly some areas of the aquarium should contain wood root, plants and low water currents. Aquariums with darker substrates and dense vegetation will help bring out their brilliant silver, white and black coloration and provide them with a good sense of security. Black Neon Tetra are an omnivorous species that will readily accept a variety of flake, crisp, freeze-dried, frozen or live foods. A typical tropical species staple flake will satisfy their complete nutritional needs; however, they can be offered bloodworms, brine or other similar foodstuffs to give them some variety in their diet. Ideally the Black Neon Tetra should be fed 2 to 3 times per day small amounts of food that they will consume within a 5 minute period.
Albino Buenos Aires Tetra
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(Hemigrammus caudovittatus) Easy Peaceful 4" 30 gallons 64-82° F, KH 12-30, pH 7.0-8.3 Omnivore South America Characidae Tetras Community The Albino Buenos Aires Tetra (Hemigrammus caudovittatus) is a color variant of the popular Buenos Aires Tetra, which originate from river basins found near Buenos Aires, Argentina. They are one of the hardiest Tetra species found within the aquarium trade and are capable to adapting to a wide range of water temperatures and pH values. Albino Buenos Aires Tetra are sought after both for their appearance and their good aquarium personality, as they can co-exist with pretty much any tropical community fish without problems. Their combination of ease of care, attractive appearance, peaceful personality, active swimming nature and medium size make the Albino Buenos Aires Tetra the perfect addition to most any freshwater tropical community or tropical planted community aquarium. Albino Buenos Aires Tetras are somewhat more aggressive than some of the smaller Tetra species, but are still generally quite peaceful towards all but the smallest tank mates. They are known to eat some species of aquatic plants, but should not pose too much of a threat to a larger established and thriving planted aquarium. The Albino Buenos Aires Tetra is not a good choice for a very small or nano planted aquarium (less than 30 gallons), as their feeding on the plant leaves will most likely put too much pressure in such a small environment. In the wild they are found living together in schools which provide them safety and a social structure. It is best to keep a small group of Albino Buenos Aires Tetras, which will give them a sense of security and limit their picking or nipping at smaller less boisterous species. An ideal aquarium environment for the (Hemigrammus caudovittatus) would include plenty of plants, driftwood, rocky caves and open swimming areas. They do not have specific lighting or water movement requirements, but will appreciate moderate water flow which will help to replicate their native habitat. Feed Albino Buenos Aires Tetra a varied diet of quality commercial foods 2 or 3 times per day the amount of food they will consume within a few minutes. They are not picky eaters and will readily accept a wide variety of plant and animal based foods. They should readily accept quality flake, freeze-dried and small pellet foods, tubifex worms, blood worms, frozen foods, algae or plant based flakes and crisps, brine shrimp, mysis shrimp and a variety of other similar food items.
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