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Black Shark
2 likes Sharks
(Labeo chrysophekadion) Easy Semi-aggressive 24" 125 gallons 76-82° F, KH 10-15, pH 6.5-7.5 Omnivore Southeast Asia, Malaysia Cyprinidae Sharks Community Native Habitat and Species Information The Black Shark (Labeo chrysophekadion) is a large freshwater Shark (catfish) species that hails from the rivers and streams of Malaysia and portions of southeast Asia. While they are commonly sold along side much smaller freshwater shark species, they grow much larger and are more aggressive than Redtail or Rainbow Sharks. Black Sharks can reach upwards of 2 feet in length in larger aquariums and have the aggressive disposition to go with their large size. They are best suited for aquariums with larger community fish species or New World Cichlids, who are capable of handling the aggressive nature of the Black Shark. Due to their large size, hobbyists should also consider the aquarium decor as well as tank mates. Plants should be well rooted, hardier species and should be clustered around wood root or rocks so that they are not dug up. Additionally the aquarium aquascaping design should allow for plenty of open space to allow the Black Shark to swim freely. Keeping Black Sharks in larger aquariums (greater than 125 gallons) is important in order to mitigate aggression towards their tank mates, since they will attempt to claim the entire aquarium as their own territory. Black Sharks housed in larger aquariums (6 feet in length or more) that are aqua-scaped with a mix of plants, driftwood and rocks tend to be only semi-aggressive, as they are able to establish their territory without taking over the entire tank. They should not be housed with any fish or invertebrate species that can fit in their mouth or that is easily intimidated. Black Sharks are also not recommended for heavily planted aquariums or aquariums with delicate plant species as they will consume many species of plants. While not ideal for typical freshwater community aquariums, the Black Shark does make an excellent addition to larger community aquariums with a mix of large community fish species and peaceful to semi-aggressive New World Cichlid species. Overall the Black Shark is a very interesting and inquisitive species that exhibits an attractive black coloration and active swimming style. Provide the Black Shark (Labeo chrysophekadion) with a larger aquarium of at least 6 feet in length and plenty of open swimming room. They also should be provided plenty of aqua-scaping like potted plants, driftwood, rock caves, pots or other decorations that will allow them to establish their own territory within the aquarium. Their large size and active swimming style make them somewhat destructive if house in heavily planted or smaller aquariums. In their native habitat, they root around in the substrate for plant matter and worms, thus they aquarium habitat should be designed with this in mind. Strong biological and mechanical filtration in the form of a large canister or wet/dry filter should be utilized to handle the biological load of large fish species like the Black Shark. Their natural river habitats have plenty of water turnover, thus the Black Shark is accustomed to good water conditions. Black Sharks are known to be escape artists that will jump out of uncovered aquariums and splash water from the aquarium while feeding at the surface. Creating multiple territories within the aquarium by placing rocky caves, pots or driftwood in multiple areas of the aquarium will help lesson aggression between the Black Shark and its tank mates. Black Sharks are an omnivorous species that will consume a very wide array of food items from plant matter to smaller fish species. Their diet should consist of a variety of foods including: quality commercial flakes and pellets, bloodworms, tubifex worms, blanched vegetables and commercial frozen foods designed for omnivores. They are a quick growing species with strong appetites. They should be fed meaty foods multiple times per day and have access to plant matter or blanched vegetables to graze on throughout the day.
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Mc Rodolph Valdez
Rainbow Shark
1 like Sharks
(Epalzeorhynchos frenatus) Moderate Semi-aggressive 6" 30 gallons 72-80° F, KH 10-15, pH 6.5-7.5 Omnivore Thailand, Southeast Asia Cyprinidae Sharks Community The Rainbow Shark originates from the river basins of the Mekong, Xe Bangfai, Chao Phraya and Maeklong rivers of Southeast Asia, Thailand and Indonesia. They are typically found inhabiting calmer areas of the river where water flow is moderate and the river bottom is sandy with plenty of lush vegetation. They were give the common name of Rainbow Shark when first introduced into the aquarium hobby due to their body shape and finnage which somewhat resembles that of a shark. They are of course not real sharks, but a type of ray finned fish common to the region in which they live. They have strong availability within the aquarium hobby and have been widely imported for a long time. They generally go by the common name of Rainbow Shark, but like most species are often sold under a variety of common names including: ruby shark, red-fin shark, red-finned shark, etc. Rainbow Sharks are considered moderately difficult to care for due to their territorial behavior towards those of their own species and similarly shaped species. The larger the aquarium and the more plants, rocky caves and tunnels provided to them, the more their territorial nature can be mitigated. Single specimens can be kept in aquariums as small as 30 gallons, but do better in aquariums of 55 gallons or more. In order to keep multiple Rainbow Sharks or to keep a Rainbow Shark with a similar species like a Red Tail Shark or Bala Shark, a much larger aquarium is required to provide each specimen with enough territory. A suitably large aquarium for multiple specimens would be a 6 foot long tank like a 125 gallon, which if aqua-scaped correctly could provide plenty of territory for multiple specimens. Rainbow Sharks prefer a sandy substrate, but this is not a requirement as they can also do very well with gravel substrates as well. It is important to provide them with plenty of vegetation and cave or tunnel structures in order to replicate their natural environment. Rainbow Sharks can be kept with most commonly available freshwater community fish species, but can be a bit too aggressive for some of the more shy species. They generally do not exhibit aggression towards other fish species that are shaped unlike themselves. However, if kept in a very small aquarium (less than 30 gallons) they may become more aggressive towards all of their tank mates. In their natural environment Rainbow Sharks feed mostly on algae, decaying plant matter, insect larvae and small meaty items they find on the river bed. In the aquarium they will readily feed on a wide variety of staple aquarium foods including: flake, frozen, tubifex worms, blood worms, algae wafers and similar food items. They should be offered plenty of vegetable based foods in their diet in order to ensure that they have a balanced diet, which will help them maintain a strong immune system.
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Albino Rainbow Shark
2 likes Sharks
(Epalzeorhynchos frenatus) Moderate Semi-aggressive 6" 30 gallons 72-80° F, KH 10-15, pH 6.5-7.5 Omnivore Thailand, Southeast Asia Cyprinidae Sharks Community Albino Rainbow Sharks are an albino color variant of the popular Rainbow Shark tropical community aquarium fish. They originate from the river basins of the Mekong, Xe Bangfai, Chao Phraya and Maeklong rivers of Southeast Asia, Thailand and Indonesia. They are typically found inhabiting calmer areas of the river where water flow is moderate and the river bottom is sandy with plenty of lush vegetation. They were give the common name of Albino Rainbow Shark when first introduced into the aquarium hobby due to their body shape and finnage which somewhat resembles that of a shark. They are of course not real sharks, but a type of ray finned fish common to the region in which they live. They have strong availability within the aquarium hobby and have been widely imported for a long time. They generally go by the common name of Albino Rainbow Shark, but like most species are often sold under a variety of common names including: ruby shark, red-fin shark, red-finned shark, etc. Albino Rainbow Sharks are considered moderately difficult to care for due to their territorial behavior towards those of their own species and similarly shaped species. The larger the aquarium and the more plants, rocky caves and tunnels provided to them, the more their territorial nature can be mitigated. Single specimens can be kept in aquariums as small as 30 gallons, but do better in aquariums of 55 gallons or more. In order to keep multiple Albino Rainbow Sharks or to keep a Albino Rainbow Shark with a similar species like a Red Tail Shark or Bala Shark, a much larger aquarium is required to provide each specimen with enough territory. A suitably large aquarium for multiple specimens would be a 6 foot long tank like a 125 gallon, which if aqua-scaped correctly could provide plenty of territory for multiple specimens. Albino Rainbow Sharks prefer a sandy substrate, but this is not a requirement as they can also do very well with gravel substrates as well. It is important to provide them with plenty of vegetation and cave or tunnel structures in order to replicate their natural environment. Albino Rainbow Sharks can be kept with most commonly available freshwater community fish species, but can be a bit too aggressive for some of the more shy species. They generally do not exhibit aggression towards other fish species that are shaped unlike themselves. However, if kept in a very small aquarium (less than 30 gallons) they may become more aggressive towards all of their tank mates. In their natural environment Albino Rainbow Sharks feed mostly on algae, decaying plant matter, insect larvae and small meaty items they find on the river bed. In the aquarium they will readily feed on a wide variety of staple aquarium foods including: flake, frozen, tubifex worms, blood worms, algae wafers and similar food items. They should be offered plenty of vegetable based foods in their diet in order to ensure that they have a balanced diet, which will help them maintain a strong immune system.
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Stu
Redtail Shark
2 likes Sharks
(Epalzeorhynchos bicolor) Moderate Semi-Aggressive 5" 55 gallons 72-79° F, KH 10-15, pH 6.5-7.5 Omnivore Southeast Asia, Thailand Cyprinidae Sharks Community Redtail Sharks have beautiful jet black bodies with vibrant red tail fins. They are a medium sized tropical community species that is considered semi-aggressive with kept in a medium to large community aquarium, but can often be more aggressive if kept in too small of an aquarium with similarly sized and shaped tank mates. However, when this species is kept in 55 gallon or larger aquarium with plenty of plants, driftwood and rock-work, it can be an excellent long-lived tank mate. In the wild this species live in tropical waterways in and near Thailand where it is used to an environment with an abundance of plants and tree roots. It is best to emulate their natural habitat as best as possible in the aquarium, as this will help the Redtail Shark feel more at home in the aquarium and allow it to establish a suitable territory within the aquarium. Redtail Sharks are known as much for their territorial aquarium behavior as their striking coloration and pleasing shark-like body shape. However, this should not keep a moderately experienced aquarium keeper from keeping the Redtail Shark in a medium to large community aquarium environment. This species will often claim large territories within the aquarium and will become quite aggressive towards other of its own kind or similarly shaped species like Rainbow Sharks. This aggressive nature can be mitigated by providing multiple areas in the aquarium that contain substantial driftwood, plants and rock formations to create various territories within the aquarium. Medium to Large community aquariums of 90 gallons or more that contain plenty of driftwood, plants and rock formations should be able to support Redtail Sharks and similarly sized and shaped specimens provided the aquarium has lots of aqua-scaping. Larger aquariums of 125 gallons or more that are heavily aqua-scaped with plants, driftwood and rock formations can easily support Redtail Sharks with other similar species like Rainbow Sharks. Redtail Sharks do very well with boisterous species like barbs, tetra and rainbowfish and will generally not bother smaller fish species as long as they are in a suitable aquarium setup. Redtail Sharks are very easy to feed as they will readily consume a large variety of meaty and plant-based foodstuffs. They will take food from the waters surface, the water column and even food resting on the aquarium substrate. It is best to feed this species a varied diet that contains a combination of meaty and vegetable flake and pellet foods, freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex worms and even vegetable based pellets and wafers.
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Stu
Bala Shark
2 likes Sharks
(Balantiocheilus melanopterus) Moderate Semi-Aggressive 16" 75 gallons 70-82° F, pH 6.0-7.5, KH 10-15 Omnivore Southeast Asia Cyprinidae Sharks Community Like most fish found in the aquarium hobby the Bala Shark goes by a variety of common names including: Tri-Color Shark, Silver Shark and of course the Bala Shark named after its scientific name. Despite their large adult size, Bala Shark are most commonly kept in standard community aquariums where they will happily coexist with a variety of other community fish species. While not aggressive, they can be a problem if kept with very small fish species or if not given enough room to swim, as they are active swimmers. Adult specimens are also kept with larger, semi-aggressive fish species as they are usually able to hold their own once they have reached adult sizes of 1 foot or more. They make a great addition to medium to large aquariums where a small group of them can be kept successfully, swimming about all day providing a lot of activity within the aquarium and providing a bright silver color contrast to other less metallic fish species. Despite their large adult size, Bala Sharks like to swim in schools both in a natural setting and within an aquarium environment, thus it is best to keep them in small groups of 3 to 6 specimens. It is important to keep in mind that as adults they can reach approximately 1 1/2 feet in length, so they should only be kept in large to very large aquariums. Will not particularly aggressive, Bala Sharks can pose a hazard to much smaller fish species like Neon Tetras, as they have been known to eat small fish. Bala Sharks prefer aquarium setups that have a good mixture of open swimming areas and dense vegetation or vertically oriented drift wood. An ideal setup for this species would contain lots of live plants, driftwood and open areas to swim, with a low to moderate current and tank mates that will tolerate the Bala Sharks active nature. Bala Sharks are omnivores and thus will eat a wide variety of plant based or meaty food preparations. On top of being an omnivore, Bala Sharks are simply just not picky eaters as they will readily consume a wide variety of foodstuffs including: flaked foods, freeze-dried, vegetable or plant matter, frozen foods, bloodworms, tubifex worms and much more. It is best to feed them a 2 to 3 times per day amounts that they will consume within a minute or two.
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Mc Rodolph Valdez