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Fire Rasbora
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(Rasboroides vaterifloris) Moderate Peaceful 2" 20 gallons 76-84° F; pH 6.0-7.0; dH 2-10 Omnivore Sri Lanka Cyprinidae Rasboras Community Fire Rasbora (Rasboroides vaterifloris) are endemic to the lakes, streams and river basins of southwestern Sri Lanka. They live in large schools of individuals, which provides them protection from larger predators. Fire Rasbora are found inhabiting densely planted water ways, where they prey on small insects and micro-crustaceans. Along with schooling together in large groups Fire Rasbora also jump from the waters surface to avoid predators, thus it is important to house them in well covered aquariums. Fire Rasbora are a shy fish species that should be housed in calm, peaceful planted community aquariums and southern Asian biotope aquariums. Both wild caught and farm raised specimens are available within the aquarium hobby. Fire Rasbora are a shy schooling species, thus they should be housed in groups of 8 or more individuals. Keeping a school will provide the Fire Rasbora with a sense of security and help them deal with more boisterous tank mates. Aquariums housing Fire Rasbora should also be designed with their needs and natural habitat in mind. The aquarium should contain plenty of dense vegetation for the Fire Rasbora to retreat into when threatened; as well as, to provide them a place to forage for small pieces of plant matter or detritus. Tank mates should consist of other peaceful fish species and smaller semi-aggressive community fish species. Substrate can vary from sand to gravel, along with plenty of plants, rocks, driftwood, root or other structures within the aquarium. Moderate water flow, warm water and stable water parameters are also important in order to simulate the Fire Rasboras natural habitat. Fire Rasbora really shine when housed in well planted aquariums with dark sandy substrate and subdued or filtered lighting. Wild Fire Rasbora feed mostly on small insects, insect larvae, algae and organic plant matter. They will quickly adapt to commercial aquarium foods designed for tropical freshwater fish species. Their diet should consist of a variety of foods in order to provide all the necessary vitamins and minerals needed to support a healthy immune system. Recommended food items include high quality commercial flake foods, live or freeze-dried bloodworms, daphnia, baby brine shrimp, artemia or other similar food items. Feed smaller amounts of food 2 to 3 times per day an amount of food that the fish will consume within a few minutes.
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Eyespot Rasbora
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(Brevibora dorsiocellata) Easy Peaceful 1.5" 20 gallons 70-78° F, KH 1-10, pH 5.0-7.5 Omnivore Malaysia Cyprinidae Rasboras Community The Eyespot Rasbora (Brevibora dorsiocellata) is a small schooling species of Cyprinidae native to the black water streams and rivers of southern Malaysia, Borneo and Sumatra. The streams and rivers in which Eyespot Rasbora live in the wild are found in dimly lit forested areas which directly effect the water conditions of the streams below. The streams and rivers where Eyespot Rasbora are found are tinted a dark brown due to the release of tannins and other chemicals that come from decomposing organic matter that is scattered all along the substrate of the rivers and streams. This organic matter is composed of peat, leaves, twigs and branches that fall from the forested canopy above. All of this organic matter has both an effect of the water chemistry and on the behavior and feeding of the fish who live in these water ways. Decomposing organic matter lowers the pH which makes the water very soft and acidic, as well as darkening the waters color. The organic matter on the rivers substrate also creates lots of habitat for a variety of living creatures including: insects, worms, invertebrates, crustaceans, fish, etc. It is within this habitat that the Eyespot Rasbora thrives by predating on small worms, insects and crustaceans living in the plants and settled organics on the river bottom. Eyespot Rasbora utilize both schooling in large groups and the dense under brush of their native streams in order to protect them from large predatory species that prey on small species like Rasbora. Despite the small size of the Eyespot Rasbora they are not very suitable for very small 3 to 5 gallon pico aquariums as they should be kept in groups of 6 or more individuals, which will require at least a 20 gallon aquarium. While they are a smaller species, the streams they originate from in the wild have a large volume of water passing through them which keeps the water parameters very stable. They are also used to having plenty of room to dart in and out of vegetation and organic matter laying on the substrate, thus will appreciate having plenty of space in the home aquarium as well. A 12 gallon nano-cube or 20 gallon standard aquarium should be considered a starting point in regards to aquarium size for the this species. They will do well in a biotope setup, species only or when housed with only other smaller peaceful fish species. Eyespot Rasbora are a shoaling species that should be kept in groups of at least 6 to 10 individuals, which will help make them more comfortable in the aquarium environment. A proper aquarium setup for housing Eyespot Rasbora should include a sandy substrate, plenty of vegetation and plenty of areas in the aquarium that are shaded or dimly lit. The aquarium should ideally be planted with plenty of low light ground cover plants and driftwood to provide hiding places and habitat that the Eyespot Rasbora will feel comfortable in. Floating plants and plants that grow to the surface and then cover the surface are ideal for Eyespot Rasbora aquariums as they filter the strong aquarium lighting and create areas within the tank that are more dimly lit. The tinted water and acidic water can be replicated by adding dried leaves, peat or products like black water extract to the aquarium to both tint and condition the water. Decaying leaves on the bottom of the aquarium will also provide a supplemental food source, as the decomposition of the leaves will provide food for micro-organisms that the Eyespot Rasbora can then feed on. In the wild the Eyespot Rasbora prey on micro-foods in the form of small insects, crustaceans, worms and zooplankton. As these foods are difficult to reproduce within the home aquarium, commercial foods ranging from frozen and freeze-dried worms and daphnia to crushed flake foods can be fed in their place. Eyespot Rasbora should be fed a varied diet of flake, freeze-dried and frozen meaty foods that are small enough in size for the Eyespot Rasbora to easily consume. Crushed quality flake foods, tubifex worms, blood worms, cyclop-eeze, baby brine shrimp and similar food items should be fed a couple of times per day. Feed an amount that the fish will consume within a 3 to 5 minute period.
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Mosquito Rasbora
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(Boraras brigittae) Moderate Peaceful 1.5" 12 gallons 76-82° F, KH 5-10, pH 5.0-7.0 Carnivore, Piscivore Borneo, Indonesia, Southeast Asia Cyprinidae Rasboras Community Mosquito Rasbora (Boraras brigittae) are native to the tropical forest swamps and water ways found in many of the jungles of Southeast Asia. Their natural habitat is in black water streams and pools that are tinted dark brown from the tannin released from decaying organic matter. The substrate of these streams is made up of a sandy bottom with a thick covering of leaves, branches and twigs that form an intricate maze of hiding spots for numerous small fish species that thrive there. The Mosquito Rasbora is one of these species that thrives in this dimly lit and densely vegetated environment. They use this dense vegetation to both hide from larger predatory species of fish; as well as, to hunt for small crustaceans, insects, worms and zooplankton on which to feed. They have adapted to this dimly lit, very soft and acidic water and will do best in the home aquarium if housed in a similarly designed aquarium habitat. Despite the small size of the Mosquito Rasbora, they are not very suitable for very small 3 to 5 gallon pico aquariums as they need both stable water parameters and plenty of swimming room. While they are a smaller species, the streams they originate from in the wild have a large volume of water passing through them which keeps the water parameters stable. They are also used to having plenty of room to dart in and out of the vegetation, and will appreciate having plenty of space in the home aquarium as well. A 12 gallon nano-cube or 20 gallon standard aquarium should be considered a starting point in regards to aquarium size for the this species. Their small size and shy disposition makes the Mosquito Rasbora only suitable for very peaceful community aquariums that do not have semi-aggressive species like Angelfish, Catfish and Barbs. They will do well in a biotope setup, species only or when housed with only other smaller peaceful fish species. Mosquito Rasbora are a shoaling species that should be kept in groups of at least 6 to 10 individuals, which will help make them more comfortable in the aquarium environment. Competition for females in the group will also bring out the males coloration and provide some interesting behavior as they compete for the females attentions. A proper aquarium setup for housing Mosquito Rasbora's should include a sandy substrate, plenty of vegetation and plenty of areas in the aquarium that are shaded or dimly lit. The aquarium should ideally be planted with plenty of ground cover plants and driftwood to provide hiding places and habitat that the Mosquito Rasbora will feel comfortable in. Floating plants and plants that grow to the surface and then cover the surface are ideal for Mosquito Rasbora aquariums as they filter the strong aquarium lighting and create areas within the tank that are more dimly lit. The tinted water and acidic water can be replicated by adding dried leaves, peat or products like black water extract to the aquarium to both tint and condition the water. Decaying leaves on the bottom of the aquarium will also provide a supplemental food source, as the decomposition of the leaves will provide food for micro-organisms that the Mosquito Rasbora can then feed on. In the wild the Mosquito Rasbora preys on micro-foods in the form of small insects, crustaceans, worms and zooplankton. As these foods are difficult to reproduce within the home aquarium, commercial foods ranging from frozen and freeze-dried worms and daphnia to crushed flake foods can be fed in their place. Mosquito Rasbora should be fed a varied diet of flake, freeze-dried and frozen meaty foods that are small enough in size for the Mosquito Rasbora to consume. Crushed quality flake foods, tubifex worms, cyclop-eeze, baby brine shrimp and similar food items should be fed a couple of times per day. Feed an amount that the fish will consume within a 3 to 5 minute period.
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Scissortail Rasbora
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(Rasbora trilineata) Moderate Peaceful 6" 30 gallons 72-78° F, KH 2-5, pH 6.0-7.0 Omnivore Vietnam Cyprinidae Rasboras Community The Scissortail Rasbora is a schooling fish that originates from the tropical waterways and flood plains of Vietnam. It is a long sleek quick fish species that use their speed along with large schools of individuals to evade larger predators. Their speed also comes in handy when it comes to feeding, as they can catch small insects in the water and at the waters surface. They make a very interesting aquarium species as they will school together and swim about the upper regions of the aquarium; as well as, swimming in and out of taller plant species and tall pieces of driftwood. The Scissortail Rasbora also has a very bright iridescent silver sheen that sparkles as the bright aquarium lights reflect off of the fish as it swims. Scissortail Rasbora add a lot of contrast to most community aquariums as they are fast top water swimmers, where as the majority of species kept are slower moving mid-water species. Overall the Scissortail Rasbora makes a great addition to all but the smallest freshwater tropical community aquariums. While Scissortail Rasbora do not have specific feeding or aquarium setup requirements, they do best when kept in groups of 4 or more individuals with plenty of horizontal swimming room. They are very active swimmers that bring a lot of movement and energy to any tropical community aquarium. They are peaceful towards other fish species and are quick enough to easily evade all but the most persistent bullies that they may encounter within the tropical community aquarium environment. They should be housed in aquariums that are fully covered as they are well known jumpers that instinctively will take to the air when they are startled. Scissortail Rasbora appreciate the presence of plants and driftwood, but also require plenty of open swimming area to feel most at home. Darker substrates and medium plant density along with proper lighting will help to bring out the best coloration in this species, that are capable of exhibiting brilliant silver, gold and black colors. Scissortail Rasbora are an omnivorous species that will readily accept a wide variety of flake, crisp, freeze-dried, frozen or live foods. A typical tropical species staple flake will satisfy their complete nutritional needs; however, they can be offered bloodworms, brine or other similar foodstuffs to give them some variety in their diet.
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Harlequin Rasbora
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(Rasbora heteromorpha) Easy Peaceful 2" 10 gallons 72-77° F, KH 6-10, pH 6.0-6.5 Omnivore Asia Cyprinidae Rasboras Community The Harlequin Rasbora is one of the more popular species of Rasbora found within the aquarium hobby. They are highly desirable additions to freshwater community aquariums as a group of Harlequin's have beautiful coloration and markings with a very docile disposition that makes them perfect tank mates for other small or medium sized community species. Harlequin's are easily recognizable due to their rich reddish-copper body and the distinctive black wedge marking on the rear half of their body. In the wild they will always be found in good sized schools, thus they should also be kept in groups within the aquarium environment as well. Keeping a group of 8 or more Harlequin Rasbora will make them feel much more safe and comfortable within the aquarium and will show off their markings as the group will have a much more striking appearance than a single individual. In the wild Harlequin Rasbora are found living in tropical lowland waterways throughout southeastern Asia. Their natural habitat is very heavily populated with dense vegetation and maintains tropical temperatures of 73 to 79 F (22 -26 C) throughout the year. Like most Rasbora species, Harlequin Rasbora are considered an easy species to keep within a community aquarium. They will do best in setups that resemble their natural habitat and that have consistent water parameters. Harlequins should be kept in schools of 8 or more individuals in aquariums that have plenty of plants and driftwood along with stable water conditions that include temperatures in the mid to upper 70's and pH in the range of 6.0 to 6.5. They should also be kept with other similarly sized peaceful fish species or with docile medium sized fish species. If they are kept with more boisterous species like barbs, sharks or angelfish, it is best to provide them a habitat with plenty of plants so that they can retreat to safer areas of the aquarium when they feel threatened or if picked on. Harlequins themselves will not nip at or bother other fish or invertebrate species and are considered good tank mates for even the most sensitive fish species. Harlequin Rasbora are very easy to feed as they will readily consume a wide variety of meaty and vegetable based foods. They will do well with a varied diet consisting of flake foods, small pellets, freeze-dried bloodworms or tubifex worms and other similar preparations. Harlequin Rasboras are generally considered difficult to breed, but have been breed by advanced aquarists and some professional breeders. Their willingness to breed is very dependent on their environment and the age of the breeding specimens. They should be housed in an aquarium with plenty of broad leafed plants with a stable water temperature between 76 and 79 degrees F, along with an acidic soft water with a pH of 6.0 to 6.3. Within these conditions the aquarist should introduce a small group of 2 or 3 young females (9 to 12 months of age) along with a more mature male (approx. 2 years of age). The newly introduced breeding group should be fed live foods while in the breeding aquarium. Breeding typically takes place in the early morning hours and consists of the male of the species trembling near or rubbing up against the females in order to try and induce them to spawn. If interested the female will rub her underside against the underside of a broad leaf and encourage the male to join her there to fertilize the eggs. The fertilized eggs will adhere to the bottom of the leaf where they will stay until they hatch in about 24 hours. After the eggs are laid, the parents should be removed from the aquarium and the lights should be kept dim until 24 to 48 hours after the eggs have hatched. Like all small fry, the babies should be kept with a small bubble filter that will oxygenate and keep the water filtered, while also keeping the water from stagnating. The babies should be fed small foods like infusoria and then gradually moved to larger foodstuffs over the course o the next 6 to 8 weeks.
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