Categories
Reticulated Hillstream Loach
1 like Loaches
(Sewellia lineolata) Moderate Peaceful 3" 30 gallons 64-76° F, KH 8-15, pH 6.5-7.5 Omnivore Southeast Asia, China, India Balitoridae Loaches Community The Reticulated Hillstream Loach is an example of where a natural adaptation for their native habitat has inadvertently produced a gem for the aquarium hobby, with a species that has a unique almost Stingray like appearance and an active, inquisitive swim style. While many algae eaters and plecos have developed adaptations that allow them to cling to rocks and wood in their native stream habitats, the Reticulated Hillstream Loach has a highly modified flattened body that has a Stingray like appearance, which has allowed them to succeed in fast-flowing mountain streams, rivers, and rapids. This flattened body shape helps the Reticulated Hillstream Loach both navigate and cling to rocks and wood in very strong currents with minimal effort. In addition, this very practical and specialized body shape helps accentuate the gorgeous wing-like finnage of the Hillstream Loach. This combined with a graphic mottled pattern adds further visual interest which sets this species of algae eater apart from the typical algae eater found witin the hobby. Despite the adaptations for fast flowing waters, the Reticulated Hillstream Loach can thrive in the aquarium environment provided that they are provided additional water flow, highly oxyginated water and a substrate free of built up organic matter. Additional water flow in the form of a powerhead or a canister filter that is over-sized for the aquarium and utilizes a spray bar return, are essential aspects of a proper aquarium housing Reticulated Hillstream Loaches. The additional water flow will not only increase disolved oxygen and provide water current, but will also keep detritus and dissolving organics from building up on the aquarium substrate and in crevices created by rocks and driftwood. These slight enhancements to the typical tropical community aquarium setup will help make the tank suitable for housing fish like the Reticulated Hillstream Loach, who are adapted for streams and fast flowing rivers. In general the hobbyist will want to stay away from keeping this species in the typical blackwater Amazon habitat with calm waters and substrate obscurred by leaf litter, and instead keep them in a tank designed to emulate a stream or river habitat. While Reticulated Hillstream Loach can tolerate colder water temperatures down into the low 60°s F, they can do well in aquariums with water temperatures all they way up to the mid 70°s F. The warmer the aquarium water the more important that the hobbyist maintain high levels of dissolved oxygen and significant water flow. Suitable tank mates consist of pretty much any community fish species and any Cichlid species that won't see the Reticulated Hillstream Loach as a potential meal. Additionally, tank mates should share the Reticulated Hillstream Loach love of flowing waters and require higher water temperatures in the upper 70°s F to mid 80°s F like Discus. In healthy well established aquariums the Reticulated Hillstream Loach will feed primarily on algae, detritus and leftover food items that make it in between rocks or on to the aquarium substrate. They are prolific algae eaters who will readily clear rocks, plant leaves and aquarium glass of algae and any small bits of detritus or micro-crustaceans living in the algae. If kept in an aquarium where there is not sufficient algae growth or ample feeding opportunities on leftover foods reaching the substrate, the Reticulated Hillstream Loach can be fed sinking algae wafers, carnivore pellets, flake foods or freeze-dried foods designed for freshwater fish. In situations where direct feeding is required in order to make sure that the Reticulated Hillstream Loach is properly fed, hobbyists can feed them vegetables like cucumber or blanched spinach or meaty food items ranging from brine shrimp to commercial flake or pellet foods as long as the foods sink to the bottom of the aquarium.
AD Admin
Redtail Botia Loach
1 like Loaches
(Yasuhikotakia modesta) Moderate Semi-aggressive 10" 55 gallons 76-86° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore Southeast Asia Cobitidae Loaches Large-Bottom-Dweller The Redtail Botia Loach or as they are also commonly known as Red-finned Loach or Blue Botia are available both in local fish stores and online fairly regularly. Yasuhikotakia modesta are a large species of Loach with heavily built bodies that can reach lengths of 10 inches in the wild and 8 inches in the aquarium environment. While they can be raised in aquariums as small as 55 gallons, the Redtail Botia Loach will outgrow the aquarium as they mature. They prefer to live in groups, thus a large aquarium (220 gallons or larger) is required to properly house an adult group. Being a large somewhat territorial species, the Redtail Botia Loach should only be kept with other large Semi-aggressive community species like large Barbs, Loaches, Plecos and other species with similar temperaments. In order to properly house the Redtail Botia Loach (Yasuhikotakia modesta) the hobbyist should do their best to replicate their native tropical stream habitat. Redtail Botia Loach live in tropical Southeast Asian streams that have a sandy substrate, vegetation along the banks along with a steady water flow. This steady water flow means that the Redtail Botia Loach is used to an environment with very low in dissolved nutrients and is highly oxygenated. Ideally this species should be kept in a group, which means that excellent mechanical, biological and chemical filtration must be used along with plenty of water movement in order to properly simulate their natural habitat. Smaller aquariums ranging from 55 to 90 gallons are adequate for a single specimen; however, a group of Redtail Botia Loach will require an aquarium of 180 gallons or greater. Provide them a sand substrate with both open swimming areas and areas with well rooted vegetation and submerged driftwood or root. Additional power heads should be used to provide water flow and keep the substrate clear of debris and leftover foodstuffs. Redtail Botia Loach are territorial and competitive amongst themselves, and will squabble during feedings and over territory. Adequate feedings and an aquarium designed with multiple areas of vegetation and submerged roots will go a long way towards mitigating this behavior. They are also known excavators, thus it is important to securely root all plants and place rocks and wood roots directly on the glass before adding the sand to insure that they remain stable. Redtail Botia Loach are easy to feed as they will readily consume a wide variety of meaty and vegetable based foods. In fact hobbyists usually find the toughest part of feeding this species is to not overfeed them, as they will greedily consume much more food than they need. It is best to offer them a variety of foods multiple times per day in amounts that they can consume within 5 minutes. It is best to feed them a variety of food items including: quality commercial flake, pellets and crips, sinking pellets, algae wafers, chopped earthworms, thawed frozen Bloodworm, Mysis Shrimp, chopped raw shrimp and other similar items.
AD Admin
Clown Loach
5 likes Loaches
(Chromobotia macracanthus) Moderate Peaceful 16" 75 gallons 76-86° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore Indonesia, Borneo, Sumatra Cobitidae Loaches Large-Bottom-Dweller The Clown Loach is common within the aquarium trade, as it is available from most all local fish stores and online retailers. However, the Clown Loach is also a commonly misunderstood species as many hobbyists do not realize the size it attains or the natural environment that it comes from. Clown Loaches get big, easily exceeding 12 inches in length and commonly reaching upwards of 16 inches. They also prefer to live in groups both in the wild and in the aquarium, thus an aquarium with a group of 12 to 16 inch fish needs to be quite large. Secondly, Clown Loaches come from fast flowing streams and rivers that have abundant current and excellent water conditions. Many aquarium hobbyists add Clown Loaches to aquariums that do not contain much water current and with water conditions that are good, but not great. It is because of this lack of understanding of the needs of the Clown Loach that many do not do well in aquarium environments that are not well suited for their needs. However, if you have a very large aquarium with strong water flow and an efficient filtration system capable of keeping the aquarium water low in nitrate and dissolved nutrients, Clown Loaches do make an excellent aquarium species that can be kept with a wide variety of community, semi-aggressive and even most of the aggressive fish species. This species will require a larger aquarium that can accommodate their large adult size and provide them ample swimming room. Strong filtration is needed to process the large bio-loads produced by a larger fish species and to keep the water quality as pristine as possible. The substrate should ideally consist of softer material like sand or small pebbles in order not to scratch or irritate the Clown Loaches stomach as it moves about the bottom of the tank. Ideally the lighting should be somewhat subdued or at least not extremely bright as Clown Loaches are typically more active at night in the wild and often inhabit dimly lit underwater caves. Aquariums housing Clown Loaches should ideally contain some driftwood, rocky caves or low light plants to provide a natural setting and provide a sense of security for the fish if they feel threatened. Clown Loaches are sensitive to poor water conditions, very bright lighting, cooler water temperatures and large fluctuations in water temperature, all of which can cause them to become stressed and more prone to diseases like ich or other parasites. Clown Loaches will eat a wide variety of foods including scavenged meals from the aquarium substrate. However, it is best to feed younger specimens multiple smaller meals throughout the day consisting of quality foods designed for freshwater fish species or made up of items that the Clown Loach would feed on in their native habitat. Some good options commonly available to most hobbyists include: freeze-dried, flake and pellet foods made from meaty foods or plant matter, bloodworms, mosquito larvae, brine shrimp, etc; manufactured sinking wafers (algae, carnivore wafers...), fresh or blanched vegetables such as cucumber, zucchini or lightly boiled peas. Larger Clown Loaches can be slightly more picky in their eating habits and will appreciate chopped prawns or similar large meaty items fed a couple of times per day.
Black Kuhlii Loach
1 like Loaches
(Pangio semicinctus) Moderate Peaceful 4" 30 gallons 76-86° F, KH 3-8, pH 6.0-6.5 Carnivore Southeast Asia Cobitidae Loaches Community Black Kuhlii Loach (Pangio semicinctus) originate from the densely vegetated jungle streams of Thailand and Borneo. They have evolved elongated bodies that allow them to move in and out of dense vegetation along the river substrate and inside tree root and submerged wood. This allows the Black Kuhlii Loach to scavenge for small worms and crustaceans that other Carnivores are not able to reach. Their ability to maneuver in tight spaces also provides them security against larger predators that would consume the Black Kuhlii Loach if provided the opportunity. As is common with most Loach species, the Black Kuhlii Loach are communal fish who live in social groups of many individuals in the wild. Hobbyists should keep at least three loaches at a minimum, with larger groups of 6 to 10 being more ideal if space allows. Being a largely nocturnal scavenger, the Black Kuhlii Loach will prefer an aquarium environment with diffused lighting or at least areas within the aquarium with lower light levels. Ideally they should be kept in heavily planted aquariums with plenty of submerged root or driftwood and / or piles of smooth rocks or rocky caves. This will provide them with plenty of places to hide and seek shelter when needed; as well as, create areas in the aquarium that have reduced or diffused lighting. Being a very peaceful and somewhat shy species, the Black Kuhlii Loach will greatly appreciate the company of others of its own kind. Keeping a group of Black Kuhlii Loaches will make them much more comfortable in the aquarium, which will have them out and about the tank more instead of hiding all day. If too few hiding places are available, the Black Kuhlii Loach will often lay on its side and not move for long periods of time. While they may appear to be sick, this is just a defense mechanism that they use when they are uncomfortable with their environment. They should only be kept with other peaceful tropical community species who will not pick at or harass the loach. Lastly, being a substrate scavenger the type of substrate used within the aquarium is important to the Black Kuhlii Loach. They prefer either a sandy substrate or a fine grained smooth gravel that will allow them to easily scavenge for food and not scrape or irritate their underside. In the wild Black Kuhlii Loaches are nocturnal scavengers, who prey on small worms, crustaceans and insect larvae. With time they can be trained to feed with the aquarium lights on, and are much more likely to do so in well planted tanks which will diffuse the bright aquarium lighting. Hobbyists should feed their Black Kuhlii Loaches a mixture of various meaty foods and commercial food designed for Carnivores. Some ideal food sources include: live, frozen or freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex worms, cyclopeeze, brine shrimp, glass worms and commercial meaty foods designed for substrate scavengers.
AD Admin
Dario Botia Loach
1 like Loaches
(Botia dario) Moderate Semi-aggressive 5" 30 gallons 74-86° F, KH 2-12, pH 6.5-7.5 Omnivore India, Bangladesh Cobitidae Loaches Community Dario Botia Loach (Botia dario) originate from the mountain streams that criss-cross Bangladesh and portions of northern India. Their native habitat experiences an abundance of rain and water from melting glacial mountain peaks, thus they are accustomed to an immense amount of fresh clean water moving through the streams in which they live. Hobbyists should strive to maintain very high water quality in aquariums housing Dario Botia Loaches in order to avoid problems like poor coloration and disease that are associated with poor water quality. In addition to high water quality, Dario Botia Loaches need high levels of dissolved oxygen and moderate internal water flow (movement) within the aquarium. As is the case with most loach species, the Dario Botia Loach is a very social species that will greatly benefit from the company of others of its own kind. Their interactions with one another are especially entertaining while they jockey for position while feeding on submerged fresh vegetables or algae wafers. When kept in social groups Dario Botia Loaches will quickly establish a social hierarchy with a dominant fish leading the group. It is highly recommended that this species is housed in social groups since they have evolved to live in this manner. Hobbyists with freshwater community or planted aquariums will find that the Dario Botia Loach makes an exciting bottom dweller that brings plenty of movement and activity to the lower areas of the aquarium. Being a native stream dweller the Dario Botia Loach prefers aquariums with water currents and clean water conditions with low nitrates. They will prefer an aquarium with a smooth gravel substrate, plants, driftwood or submerged root and some smooth rocky caves. They are accustomed to brisk water conditions, thus they are very active swimmers that will move all about the aquarium looking for food to scavenge and caves and crevices to explore. Hobbyists should consider adding additional powerheads for increased water movement and utilizing either a canister filter or wet/dry filter to provide adequate water quality. Dario Botia Loaches are mostly peaceful, but they are active swimmers so some smaller timid species may find them intimidating. Most all peaceful to semi-aggressive community fish species will get along well with the Dario Botia Loach. They should not be kept with delicate long finned species or very small timid species. The Dario Botia Loach will readily consume a wide variety of both meaty and vegetable foodstuffs. Ideally they should be fed many small meals throughout the day, with access to plant matter or algae wafers to supplement their diet of meaty flakes, pellets, frozen or live foods. They are particularly fond of bloodworms and will eagerly consume freeze-dried, frozen or live bloodworms. Blanched vegetables like zucchini and cucumber make an excellent supplement to their staple diet. They will take food directly from the water column; as well as, scavenging the aquarium substrate for food and plant matter. Overall the Dario Botia Loach is a non-fussy eater that will consume all standard aquarium foods. It should be noted that like many Loach species the Dario Botia Loach will prey on small snails, making them an excellent natural solution for nuisance snail infestations.
AD Admin
Botia kubotai Loach
1 like Loaches
(Botia kubotai) Moderate Peaceful 4" 30 gallons 72-86° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore India Cobitidae Loaches Community The Botia kubotai Loach has become a vary popular species within the aquarium hobby due to its combination of attractive coloration & pattern, hardiness and ease of care. This species has gone by a few different names since its introduction into the hobby that include: Polka Dot Loach, Burmese Border Loach & Botia Angelicus Loach. However, it has been reclassified and goes by Botia kubotai Loach at this time and moving forward. Without a doubt, their popularity is due mostly to their beautiful coloration and uniquely striking body pattern. The fact that they are relatively hardy, easy to care for, are excellent additions to community aquariums & will eat a wide variety of foods makes them an excellent species to keep for intermediate to advanced aquarium hobbyists. Botia kubotai Loaches do very well in established community aquariums when kept with similarly sized fish and provided with a combination of shaded planted or rocky areas and open swimming areas. While they are not considered an aggressive species, they can be predatory towards very small fish (under 1 inch in length) and some smaller snail species. While Botia kubotai Loaches are considered hardy fish that are strong eaters, their care level is considered moderate as they do not tolerate poor water conditions well. In the wild they come from fast flowing streams that provide them a constant supply of clean highly oxygenated water, thus they require an aquarium environment that provides them with clean water and moderate to strong water currents. Plenty of plants, rocks and driftwood are also beneficial as it allows them to both seek shelter when frightened and to escape the bright aquarium lights and find a shady spot to relax in. Botia kubotai Loach will readily consume a wide variety of both meaty and vegetable foodstuffs. Ideally they should be fed many small meals throughout the day, with access to plant matter or algae wafers to supplement their diet of meaty flakes, pellets, frozen or live foods. They are particularly fond of bloodworms and will eagerly consume freeze-dried, frozen or live bloodworms. They will take food directly from the water column; as well as, scavenging the aquarium substrate for food and plant matter.
AD Admin
Gold Dojo Loach
1 like Loaches
(Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) Moderate Peaceful 8" 30 gallons 68-76° F, KH 3-5, pH 6.0-6.5 Carnivore Southeast Asia Cobitidae Loaches Community Gold Dojo Loaches originate from Southeast Asia, where they can be found in a variety of waterways ranging from tropical rivers to lakes and ponds. As with all loaches, the Gold Dojo Loach is a bottom dwelling species that spends much of its time foraging along the bottom for food. Since the lower regions of most lakes, ponds and rivers have low lighting conditions, the Gold Dojo Loach utilizes barbells located around its mouth to find food along the bottom and among plant roots, rocky crevices and caves. While they are a carnivorous species, they are generally considered scavengers and will not prey on other aquarium inhabitants with very small shrimps being the only exception. Gold Dojo Loaches use their narrow long body and barbells to get into tight places in the substrate, underneath the edges of rocks and among plant roots to locate and eat all types of meaty foods that make it to the bottom of the aquarium. They are sought after within the aquarium hobby for their unique appearance and beneficial scavenging, that helps keep the aquarium free of decaying foodstuffs. Gold Dojo Loaches are a very peaceful species that can be safely kept in community aquariums and planted aquariums. They prefer slightly cooler water temperatures ranging from around 68° F to 78° F, which is most likely due to the fact that in the wild they live far from the water surface where temperatures are cooler. Gold Dojo Loaches are a carnivorous species that prefers meaty foods like freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex worms; as well as, frozen and live meaty foods of all types. Sinking shrimp pellets or other meaty pellets can also be fed as they will sink to the bottom of the aquarium where the Gold Dojo Loach looks for food.
AD Admin