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Paradise Gourami
1 like Gouramis
(Macropodus opercularis) Easy Semi-aggressive 4" 30 gallons 61-79° F, KH 4-18, pH 6.0-8.0 Omnivore Eastern Asia Belontiidae Gouramis Community The Paradise Gourami (Macropodus opercularis) is one of the more brightly colored members of the group of fish known as Labyrinth fish. Labyrinth fish have a special lung-like labyrinth organ which allows them to breath air from the surface of the water. It is important to note that Labyrinth fish are not born with functional labyrinth organs and instead development the organ as they grow older. Thus young labyrinth fish breathe entirely with their gills and require proper amounts of dissolved oxygen in the water to survive. Paradise Gourami are an incredibly adaptable species that can survive under hypoxic (oxygen-deprived) conditions and over a wide temperature range. However, they do prefer still to slow-moving waterways ranging from ponds, irrigation ditches and marshes to slow moving streams and backwaters of larger rivers. This flexibility has allowed the Paradise Gourami to thrive over a considerable natural range covering southeast China, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan and Korea. Introduced populations also exist in Madagascar and the USA. Paradise Gourami have a somewhat combative and territorial nature, where they will defend an area of the tank from other similarly sized and shaped tank mates. In nature they will generally look for a small area of dense vegetation to claim as their territory, which provides them shelter from predators and feeding opportunities on small aquatic organisms and insect larvae. Hobbyists should provide them an aquarium environment that includes plenty of vegetation (real or fake) and areas of calm water or slow moving water currents. In smaller aquariums (30 gallons or less) they should be kept either as the only Gourami species in the tank or as a pair. They will tolerate a variety of tank mates, but should only be kept with other Gourami or fish similar in size and shape as a Gourami in larger aquariums where multiple territories can be established. Groups of Paradise Gourami are only possible in larger aquariums (6 feet in length or more) where multiple territories can be established and there is enough room for some space between established territories. The overall aggressiveness of the Paradise Gourami makes it a poor choice to be kept with more timid fish, long-finned species or smaller species that could be eaten. The aquarium decor and water movement plays an important role in creating areas in the tank that are attractive to the Paradise Gourami as a home territory. Provide plenty of areas with bunched or dense plants, along with plenty of areas of calm water flow. Paradise Gourami are well known jumpers and will require an aquarium that is well-covered. Activity from other fish, being startled while sleeping or even things like lights coming on and off can invoke this species to jump, so it is just a matter of time before they end up on the floor if kept in aquariums that are not either well-covered. They are very tolerant of a wide variety of aquarium conditions that include both a wide range in temperature and water chemistry, with temperatures ranging between 60°F and 82°F and pH readings between 6.0 to 8.0. Ideal conditions which will bring out the coloration in the fish and promote the best health will be more inline with the average tropical community aquarium water conditions of around 75°F and a neutral pH of around 6.5 to 7.6. In the wild the Paradise Gourami is an opportunistic feeder who preys on small plank-tonic invertebrates, fish fry, insect larvae and will pick at some algae. However, the vast majority of specimens sold within the fish hobby are captive bred and would have been raised on commercial dried foods. It is best to feed them a variety of dried and frozen commercial foods that contain mostly meaty items with a small amount of vegetable content. Good options include: quality flake food, bloodworms, brine shrimp, daphnia and other similar meaty commercial meaty foods intended for freshwater community fish. It is best to vary the food sources to provide as wide a range of nutrients and minerals as possible. Feeding multiple smaller meals per day is ideal, feeding an amount of food that the fish will consume within a few minutes.
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Kissing Gourami
1 like Gouramis
(Helostoma temminckii) Moderate Semi-aggressive 9" 30 gallons 72-84° F, KH 5-20, pH 6.0-8.0 Omnivore Southeast Asia Helostomatidae Gouramis Community Kissing Gourami (Helostoma temmincki) are native to southeast Asia, where they are found living in tropical waters throughout Indonesia, Java, Thailand, Malaysia and Sumatra. They prefer slow-moving streams, floodplains and lakes with plenty of submerged vegetation. Their waters in their native habitat very widely in water chemistry, which makes the Kissing Gourami well suited for aquarium life where aquarium water chemistry varies widely from tank to tank. Kissing Gourami are also capable of living with a wide range of aquarium tank mates including both smaller more delicate species and larger more aggressive species. Their large adult size helps keep larger more aggressive fish from picking on them, while their relatively peaceful disposition makes them a suitable tank mate for smaller peaceful fish species. Lastly, hobbyists keeping multiple Kissing Gourami specimens may see them "kissing" one another by facing each other and locking lips. While not completely understood, it is believed that this behavior is a social behavior intended to establish social dominance and territory within the aquarium. Hobbyists will want to keep Kissing Gourami in aquariums of at least 30 gallons in size and with a length of 3 feet or more. At their adult size of 9 inches, the Kissing Gourami will need adequate room to swim and enough water volume to handle their waste output. A 30 gallon aquarium or larger combined with a high-end power filter or canister filter will work well for keeping this species. Ideally the aquarium aqua-scape will include large flat rocks or driftwood surfaces that the Kissing Gourami can graze bio film off of. They will also appreciate low to moderate water currents, which are similar to the calm waters that they inhabit in nature. Kissing Gourami do well with a wide variety of peaceful to semi-aggressive tank mates, but may eat very small fish like juvenile Neon Tetra or similar very small fish species. Hobbyists will want to choose hardy plant species as the Kissing Gourami will spend much of its time grazing for algae on plant leaves, rocks, driftwood and the aquarium glass. Kissing Gourami are actually a filter feeding fish species, who utilize specialized gill and mouth structures to filter microorganisms and algae from the water and submerged surfaces. It is this specialized feeding behavior that makes them appear to be "mouthing" almost constantly as they draw in water to filter it for food particles and free floating algae. They also spend much of their time using their mouths to scrape algae off of algae covered surfaces. Despite their specialized feeding behaviors, Kissing Gourami actually adapt well to aquarium life and will even consume many commercial food items. They do best with smaller soft foods like flake foods, tubifex worms, blood worms and other similar items that do not require them to crush or chew the food. Their overall diet should be high in plant material, thus they do best with flake foods that contain plenty of spirulina and vegetable material.
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Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami
2 likes Gouramis
(Trichogaster lalius) Moderate Peaceful 2" 12 gallons 70-79° F, KH 2-15, pH 6.0-7.8 Omnivore Southeast Asia, Pakistan, India Belontiidae Gouramis Community Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami (Trichogaster lalius) originate from the slow moving streams and tributaries of Pakistan, India, Bangladesh and nearby areas of southeast Asia. Their native habitat is one of gentle water currents and dense vegetation along with large volumes of water consistent with river habitats. While most Dwarf Gourami are found in streams and gentle rivers, some do live in nearby lakes as well. As their name indicates the Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami is a smaller version of the standard Gourami, thus they tend to grow to about 2 inches in length or about half of the size of a standard Gourami species. Their brilliant coloration, small size and peaceful demeanor have made the Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami a popular species with hobbyists keeping peaceful community aquariums or smaller nano aquarium setups. Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami require excellent water quality within the aquarium environment that is well filtered and has stable neutral pH & water hardness along with warm stable water temperatures. They do best in small groups where there are a few more females than males. They can also be kept as a single specimen or as a male / female pair. Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami should be kept in a peaceful community aquarium with other smaller community species with peaceful dispositions. This species will not do well in aquariums with strong direct water currents, boisterous fish species or little to no natural or artificial vegetation or other aquarium decor. One critical aspect of Dwarf Gourami husbandry is that they be housed with peaceful community tank mates. It is most likely that a Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami would allow itself to be bullied to death by a more aggressive fish than to fight back. An ideal aquarium setup for the Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami would have calm well filtered water with plenty of live plants (including floating plants) with stable neutral water parameters and peaceful tank mates. In nature the Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami eats small insects and larvae from near the surface of the water, as well as picking at algae growth on plant leaves. In the home aquarium they will eat flake food, freeze-dried food, frozen foods, and vegetable tablets. However, to maintain good health, their diet should be supplemented with periodic feedings of live or frozen foods such as blood worms, brine shrimp or similar fare. If a breeding pair is kept in water conditions that will stimulate breeding, they will create bubble nests amongst plant leaves at the surface of the water and engage in a delicate spawning process that lasts up to four hours. After spawning, the female should be removed from the aquarium so that she does not eat the young and / or fight with the male while he protects the nest. The male will care for the eggs, during which time he will be very aggressive towards any fish species approaching the nest.
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Pearl Gourami
1 like Gouramis
(Trichogaster leeri) Easy Peaceful 4" 30 gallons 74-86° F, KH 5-18, pH 6.5-8.0 Omnivore Borneo, Malaysia, Sumatra Belontiidae Gouramis Community Pearl Gourami (Trichogaster leeri) originate from the jungle streams and tributaries of the southeastern Asian countries of Borneo, Malaysia and Sumatra. Their natural habitat is one of densely vegetated slow moving streams beneath the subdued lighting of the jungle canopy. The elongated body of the Pearl Gourami and their upturned mouths make them excellent predators of small worms and crustaceans that they locate within the dense vegetation or near the waters surface. Their body shape also allows the Pearl Gourami to deftly maneuver in thick vegetation which is useful not only in catching prey, but also in avoiding larger predatory fish species. Pearl Gourami are considered an easy species to keep in the home aquarium as they are both easy to feed and tolerant of a variety of water conditions. Ideally Pearl Gourami should be housed in aquariums that replicate their natural habitat. Thus the aquarium should contain plenty of vegetation, low to moderate water movement and areas of subdued lighting. Darker substrates are ideal as they more closely mimic the peat covered river bottoms of their native rivers. Darker substrates and heavy vegetation will also bring out the brilliant coloration of the Pearl Gourami. Tank mates should range from peaceful to semi-aggressive in temperament, and should not be excessively large in size or overly boisterous. Pearl Gourami are at home in the standard tropical community or planted aquariums with other community species like Angelfish, Tetra, Barbs, Danio and other similar species. Pearl Gourami tolerate a wide range of temperatures and are not demanding in terms of water conditions, but they prefer soft, slightly acidic water when in breeding season. Males have a long, pointed dorsal fin, while the females dorsal fin is shorter and more rounded. Because the male can be rather aggressive during spawning, the aquarium habitat should provide plenty of places for the female to take refuge, this is important as the female will need to seek refuge from an overanxious male in order to avoid fin damage and stress. Pearl Gourami will accept a wide variety of prepared foods ranging from staple flake and crisp foods to freeze-dried and frozen varieties. They should be fed a varied diet that includes both meaty and plant based foods from a variety of sources. Daily feedings should consist of a mix of flakes, crisps, freeze-dried or live blood worms or black worms, brine shrimp and frozen foods designed for freshwater omnivores. Hobbyists looking to provide an optimal diet or those looking to breed should also offer blanched vegetable matter comprised of lettuce, spinach, peas or similar blanched fresh vegetables. The first sign of breeding activity is generally observed when the breeding pair is observed quivering, which is a sure sign that spawning is near completion. The eggs are released immediately thereafter, and are fertilized by the time they reach the bubble nest created earlier by the male fish. The pair may repeat the process a number of times over the course of several hours. It is not unusual for the number of eggs produced to reach into the thousands. Once spawning is complete, the females involvement is over, and she should be removed to prevent her from being attacked by the male. From this point forward until they hatch, the male will tend the eggs, carefully rearranging them and returning any errant eggs back to the nest. The eggs hatch in approximately 30 hours. The fry should be moved to a grow out tank with a sponge covered bubble filter, so that the young fish are not sucked into the filtration and killed. It is important that the fry be fed small foodstuffs, such as baby brine shrimp, infusoria or nauplii. The aquarium housing the fry should have frequent water changes during their growth as the water can become fouled quickly.
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Gold Gourami
2 likes Gouramis
(Trichogaster trichopterus) Easy Semi-Aggressive 6" 20 gallons 72-82° F, KH 4-18, pH 6.0-7.8 Omnivore Malaysia, South China Belontiidae Gouramis Community The Gold Gourami is a color variant of the Blue Gourami, that exhibits brilliant gold, orange and yellow coloration. The Gold Gourami also exhibits metallic rust colored markings on its lower body, while lacking the spots found on their Blue cousins. They originate from Southeast Asia and have been a popular community species that is widely available within the aquarium hobby trade. They have been a very popular species ever since their introduction into the hobby, due to a mix of attractive colors, interesting body shape, swimming habits and peaceful demeanor, Gold Gourami are at home in pretty much any tropical freshwater community aquarium. While always an attractive fish, their coloration and pattern can change based on their mood and their surroundings, at times being a deep Gold with a well defined pattern all the way to a pale gold with a very faint color pattern. Like many fish species the Gold Gourami goes by multiple names including: Opaline Gourami and Three-Spot Gourami, for the two spots on their body and their eye being the third spot as it is lined up nicely with the other two. Gold Gouramis also possess a labyrinth organ, which allows them to breath air directly, which comes in handy in their natural environment as they often live in shallow water with low oxygen levels. Gold Gourami are a very hardy species that is very tolerant of water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen levels and KH. They prefer aquariums that have plenty of dense live plants with calm or moderate water currents. Gold Gourami will spend most of their time near the surface of the aquarium, but will seek cover in plants of near driftwood if they feel threatened. The males of the species are very territorial and should only be kept with multiple females; however, if the aquarium is very large (125 gallon plus) a group of 6 or more Gourami can be kept together and the combination of tank size and fish group size will reduce their natural territorial aggression. Gold Goruamis are an exceptionally easy fish to feed, as they will accept virtually any meaty foods ranging from flake or freeze-dried, to live foods, such as bloodworms, brine shrimp or krill. They will also consume hydra voraciously, and are prized for their ability to eliminate this pest from the home aquarium. Gold Gouramis tolerate a wide range of temperatures and are not demanding in terms of water conditions, but they prefer soft, slightly acidic water when in breeding season. Males have a long, pointed dorsal fin, while the females dorsal fin is shorter and more rounded. Because the male can be rather aggressive during spawning, the aquarium habitat should provide plenty of places for the female to take refuge, this is important as the female will need to seek refuge from an overanxious male in order to avoid fin damage and stress. Just before the sperm are released, the pair may be observed quivering, which is a sure sign that spawning is near completion. The eggs are released immediately thereafter, and are fertilized by the time they reach the bubble nest created earlier by the male fish. The pair may repeat the process a number of times over the course of several hours. It is not unusual for the number of eggs produced to reach into the thousands. Once spawning is complete, the females involvement is over, and she should be removed to prevent her from being attacked by the male. From this point forward until they hatch, the male will tend the eggs, carefully rearranging them and returning any errant eggs back to the nest. The eggs hatch in approximately 30 hours. The fry should be moved to a grow out tank with a sponge covered bubble filter, so that the young fish are not sucked into the filtration and killed. It is important that the fry be fed small foodstuffs, such as baby brine shrimp, infusoria or nauplii. The aquarium housing the fry should have frequent water changes during their growth as the water can become fouled quickly.
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Flame Dwarf Gourami
2 likes Gouramis
(Trichogaster lalius) Moderate Peaceful 2" 20 gallons 72-82° F, KH 4-10, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore India, Southeast Asia Belontiidae Gouramis Community The Flame Dwarf Gourami is as its common name implies a small species of Gourami reaching a maximum size of only 2 inches in length. In the wild the Flame Dwarf Gourami is found living in calm, heavily vegetated waters where is maneuvers amongst the plant life looking for small insects and insect larvae on which to feed. They were selected for importation into the aquarium hobby trade due to their combination of vivid coloration and overall peaceful demeanor. Flame Dwarf Gourami have a vibrant blue coloration that fades along their body into a deep red. As is typical to most species of Gourami, the males have brighter coloration than the females as they use their bright coloration to signal or attract females during spawning. However, a group of female and male Gourami is a very impressive site. It is important to note that a group of Dwarf Gourami should contain more female specimens than males specimens to keep any squabbling between species to a minimum. Flame Dwarf Gourami require excellent water quality within the aquarium environment that is well filtered and has stable neutral pH & water hardness along with warm stable water temperatures. They do best in small groups where there are a few more females than males. They can also be kept as a single specimen or as a male / female pair. Flame Dwarf Gourami should be kept in a peaceful community aquarium with other smaller community species with peaceful dispositions. This species will not do well in aquariums with strong direct water currents, boisterous fish species or little to no natural or artificial vegetation or other aquarium decor. An ideal aquarium setup for the Flame Dwarf Gourami would have calm well filtered water with plenty of live plants (including floating plants) with stable neutral water parameters and peaceful aquarium inhabitants. In nature the Flame Dwarf Gourami eats small insects and larvae from near the surface of the water, as well as picking at algae growth on plant leaves. In the home aquarium they will eat flake food, freeze-dried food, frozen foods, and vegetable tablets. However, to maintain good health, their diet should be supplemented with periodic feedings of live foods such as blood worms or similar fare. If a breeding pair is kept in water conditions that will stimulate breeding, they will create bubble nests among plant leaves at the water's surface and engage in a delicate spawning process that lasts up to four hours. After spawning, the female should be removed from the aquarium so that she does not eat the young and/or fight with the male while he protects the nest. The male will care for the eggs, during which time he will be very aggressive towards any fish species approaching the nest.
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Blue Gourami
2 likes Gouramis
(Trichogaster trichopterus) Easy Peaceful 4" 20 gallons 72-82° F, pH 6.0-7.5, KH 5-28 Omnivore Southeast Asia Belontiidae Gouramis Community Blue Gourami are an attractive Southeast Asian community species that is widely available within the aquarium hobby trade. They have been a very popular species ever since their introduction into the hobby, due to a mix of attractive colors, interesting body shape, swimming habits and peaceful demeanor, Blue Gourami are at home in pretty much any tropical freshwater community aquarium. While always an attractive fish, their coloration and pattern can change based on their mood and their surroundings, at times being a deep blue with a well defined pattern all the way to a pale blue with a very faint color pattern. Like many fish species the Blue Gourami goes by multiple names including: Opaline Gourami and Three-Spot Gourami, for the two spots on their body and their eye being the third spot as it is lined up nicely with the other two. Blue Gouramis also possess a labyrinth organ, which allows them to breath air directly, which comes in handy in their natural environment as they often live in shallow water with low oxygen levels. Blue Gourami are a very hardy species that is very tolerant of water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen levels and KH. They prefer aquariums that have plenty of dense live plants with calm or moderate water currents. Blue Gourami will spend most of their time near the surface of the aquarium, but will seek cover in plants of near driftwood if they feel threatened. The males of the species are very territorial and should only be kept with multiple females; however, if the aquarium is very large (125 gallon plus) a group of 6 or more Gourami can be kept together and the combination of tank size and fish group size will reduce their natural territorial aggression. Blue Goruamis are an exceptionally easy fish to feed, as they will accept virtually any meaty foods ranging from flake or freeze-dried, to live foods, such as bloodworms, brine shrimp or krill. They will also consume hydra voraciously, and are prized for their ability to eliminate this pest from the home aquarium. Blue Gouramis tolerate a wide range of temperatures and are not demanding in terms of water conditions, but they prefer soft, slightly acidic water when in breeding season. Males have a long, pointed dorsal fin, while the females dorsal fin is shorter and more rounded. Because the male can be rather aggressive during spawning, the aquarium habitat should provide plenty of places for the female to take refuge, this is important as the female will need to seek refuge from an overanxious male in order to avoid fin damage and stress. Just before the sperm are released, the pair may be observed quivering, which is a sure sign that spawning is near completion. The eggs are released immediately thereafter, and are fertilized by the time they reach the bubble nest created earlier by the male fish. The pair may repeat the process a number of times over the course of several hours. It is not unusual for the number of eggs produced to reach into the thousands. Once spawning is complete, the female's involvement is over, and she should be removed to prevent her from being attacked by the male. From this point forward until they hatch, the male will tend the eggs, carefully rearranging them and returning any errant eggs back to the nest. The eggs hatch in approximately 30 hours. The fry should be moved to a grow out tank with a sponge covered bubble filter, so that the young fish are not sucked into the filtration and killed. It is important that the fry be fed small foodstuffs, such as baby brine shrimp, infusoria or nauplii. The aquarium housing the fry should have frequent water changes during their growth as the water can become fouled quickly.
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