Categories
Orange Finned Danio
(Danio kyathit) Easy Peaceful 2" 10 gallons 64-78° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.0-7.8 Omnivore Northern Myanmar Cyprinidae Danios Community Native to the rivers and tributaries of northern Myanmar, wild Orange Finned Danios are found in a variety of habitats, ranging from fast-moving streams to shallow pools and stillwater areas. They utilize the cover of dense vegetation and rock formations both for protection from larger fish species, and as an ideal location in which to hunt for micro foods like tiny crustaceans and insect larvae. Orange Finned Danios add a punch of orange color to the standard Zebra Danio, which has been a popular mainstay within the aquarium hobby for decades due to a combination of their attractive appearance, ease of care, active swimming style and widespread availability. They are an excellent species for beginning hobbyists due to their hardy nature, ability to tolerate a wide range of water parameters and overall ease of care and feeding. They are also popular because of their active swimming style and attractive striping. A group or small school of Orange Finned Danio swimming in and out of the plants or other aquarium decor is a very attractive sight to behold. Their small size and peaceful demeanor makes them ideal tank mates for peaceful community aquariums, planted aquariums and nano or pico table top aquariums. The natural habitat of the Orange Finned Danio varies depending on seasonal rains as they spend the dry season in larger streams and tributaries, while venturing out into flooded pools and smaller water ways during the wet season. They do not have specific aquarium decor requirements, but will appreciate the presence of plants, driftwood, rocks and other similar decor in order to give them someplace to retreat when threatened. They have only basic needs when it comes to filtration and water movement, with any aquarium designed to house tropical community fish being suitable. Tank mates should include other peaceful to semi-aggressive fish species that are not large enough to consider the Orange Finned Danio as food. Orange Finned Danio school in nature, thus they prefer to be kept in sizeable groups of at least 8 or more individuals. They will typically live longer if kept in groups or small schools and are generally considered more interesting to watch while swimming in tight groups. Being a omnivorous species they need a varied diet containing both meaty and vegetable matter. In the wild they are considered a micro predator since they prey on small insect larvae, crustaceans and other small invertebrates. They also consume algae and plant matter by picking at vegetation and decaying material on the substrate. Orange Finned Danio are very easy to feed in the aquarium environment and will readily consume a very wide variety of commercial foods. Their staple diet should consist of quality flake foods, freeze-dried foods, blood worms, tubifex worms, brine shrimp along with some frozen foods designed for tropical omnivores. They should be fed one or two times per day an amount of food that they will consume within a couple of minutes.
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Sunburst Orange GloFish Danio
(Danio rerio) Easy Peaceful 2" 5 gallons 64-76° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.5-7.5 Omnivore Selectively Bred Cyprinidae GloFish Community The Sunburst Orange GloFish® Danio (Danio rerio) is a genetically modified Zebra Danio, that has been genetically modified with a fluorescent protein gene and selectively bred to enhance the naturally occurring but rare fluorescent coloration. Scientists were able to take the fluorescent protein genes which occurs naturally in some marine organisms and implant it into multiple species of freshwater tropical fish. GloFish® sold within the aquarium hobby today are bred from the offspring of fluorescent fish that were originally developed several years ago. Each new GloFish® fluorescent fish inherits its unique color directly from its parents, maintains the color throughout its life, and passes the color along to its offspring. Hobbyists should not confuse modern GloFish® with dyed or injected fish that were impregnated with a fluorescent dye below their skin. Dyed fish would lose their color over time, were generally less healthy due to the dying process and considered by many to be subjected to inhumane treatment. Sunburst Orange GloFish® Danio do well in a diverse amount of aquarium environments ranging from simple desktop aquariums of a couple of gallons, all the way to large planted tropical aquariums. The natural habitat of Danio varies depending on seasonal rains as they spend the dry season in larger streams and tributaries, while venturing out into floodplains and smaller water ways during the wet season. They do not have specific aquarium decor requirements, but will appreciate the presence of plants, driftwood, rocks and other similar decor in order to give them someplace to retreat when threatened. Sunburst Orange GloFish® Danio have only basic needs when it comes to filtration and water movement, with any aquarium designed to house tropical community fish being suitable. Tank mates should include other peaceful to semi-aggressive fish species that are not large enough to consider the them as food. Danio school in nature, thus they prefer to be kept in groups of 8 or more individuals. They will typically live longer if kept in groups or small schools and are generally considered more interesting to watch while swimming in tight groups. While Sunburst Orange GloFish® Danio are genetically modified for appearance and selectively bred to enhance that appearance, they are just like Zebra Danio in terms of aquarium care, tank mates and feeding. Sunburst Orange GloFish® Danio have the same feeding requirements as non-genetically modified Danio species. All Danio species are omnivorous, thus require a varied diet containing both meaty and vegetable matter. In the wild they are considered a micro predator since they prey on small insect larvae, crustaceans and other small invertebrates. They also consume algae and plant matter by picking at vegetation and decaying material on the substrate. Sunburst Orange GloFish® Danio are very easy to feed in the aquarium environment and will readily consume a very wide variety of commercial foods. Their staple diet should consist of quality flake foods, freeze-dried foods, blood worms, tubifex worms, brine shrimp along with some frozen foods designed for tropical omnivores. They should be fed a couple of times per day an amount of food that they will consume within a couple of minutes. GloFish® fluorescent fish were originally bred to help detect environmental pollutants. By adding a natural fluorescence gene to the fish, scientists hope to one day quickly and easily determine when a waterway is contaminated. The first step in developing a pollution-detecting fish was to create fish that would be fluorescent all the time. Scientists soon realized that the public interest in sharing the benefits of this research, a process which lead to GloFish® fluorescent fish. For over a decade, fluorescent fish have been relied upon by scientists worldwide to better understand important questions in genetics, molecular biology, and vertebrate development. Fluorescent fish have been particularly helpful in understanding cellular disease and development, as well as cancer and gene therapy. The fluorescent color in our fish is produced by a fluorescent protein gene, which creates the beautiful fluorescence that can be seen when looking at the fish. The fluorescent protein genes occur naturally, and are derived from marine organisms. No. Today GloFish® fluorescent fish are bred from the offspring of fluorescent fish that were originally developed several years ago. Each new GloFish® fluorescent fish inherits its unique color directly from its parents, maintains the color throughout its life, and passes the color along to its offspring. To achieve their goal of helping to fight water pollution, scientists are hoping to one day develop a switch that will cause always-fluorescing fish to selectively fluoresce in the presence of environmental toxins. A non-fluorescing fish will signal that the water is safe, while a fluorescing fish will signal trouble. To help further the research, a portion of the proceeds from sales of all GloFish® fluorescent fish goes directly to the lab where these fish were originally created. For more information on this project, please review the article entitled (Zebrafish as Pollution Indicators,) by the National University of Singapore. Aside from their brilliant color, fluorescent fish are the same as their non-fluorescent counterparts. This includes everything from general care and temperature preferences to growth rate and life expectancy. No. The fish are as healthy as other fish in every way. Scientists originally developed them several years ago by adding a natural fluorescence gene to the fish eggs before they hatched. Today GloFish® fluorescent fish are bred from the offspring of these original fish. Every line of GloFish® fluorescent fish (i.e. Starfire Red®, Electric Green®, Sunburst Orange®, Cosmic Blue®, and Galactic Purple®) starts with a single fish. The general process of developing fluorescent fish, as illustrated in this chart, begins by adding a fluorescence gene to the fish before it hatches from its egg. Once the gene integrates into the genome (i.e., genetic code) of the embryo, the developing fish will be able to pass the fluorescence gene along to its offspring upon maturity. Because of this, the gene only needs to be added to one embryo; from that point forward, all subsequent fluorescent fish are the result of traditional breeding. Scientists all around the world are working with fluorescent fish, whether it is to help protect the environment or come up with new disease-fighting drug therapies. As more fluorescent fish become available, they may be offered for sale to the public. We have submitted detailed information regarding our fish to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, which has jurisdiction over biotech animals, as set forth here, as they consider the added gene to be an “animal drug”. Consistent with the findings of scientists worldwide, the FDA, working in coordination with the United States Department of Agriculture and United States Fish & Wildlife Service, found no evidence that our fluorescent fish pose any more threat to the environment than their non-fluorescent counterparts. If you would like to read the FDA statement regarding our zebrafish, please click here. In addition to the Federal review described above, our fish have been reviewed by various state agencies, including the Florida Division of Aquaculture and other state agencies. In accordance with the findings of the FDA, these reviews have concluded that our fluorescent fish are as safe for the environment as their non-fluorescent counterparts. To review their specific analyses, as well as those of independent third party experts, please see the GloFish® Science section of our website. GloFish® fluorescent fish are tropical fish and are unable to survive in non-tropical environments. Their non-fluorescent counterparts have been sold to aquarium owners worldwide for more than fifty years. Despite all these years of widespread distribution, they are only found in tropical environments. At the same time, please remember that GloFish® fluorescent fish are intended for use as aquarium fish only, and should never be intentionally released into the wild. For an animal in the wild, eating a fluorescent fish is the same as eating any other fish. Their fluorescence is derived from a gene that is already found in nature and is completely safe for the environment. Just as eating a blue fish would not turn a predator blue, eating a fluorescent fish would not make a predator fluoresce. Fluorescent fish absorb light and then re-emit it. This creates the perception that they are glowing, particularly when shining a black light on the fish in a dark room. For tips on the best way to display your fish, please visit our GloFish® Display page. In general, we have found that an actinic (blue wavelength) light is ideal, as this can be used in both light and dark rooms. This type of light can be found in most stores that sell aquarium fish. Another great option for a completely dark room is a standard 18 inch black light bulb, similar to the one pictured here. (For black light to optimally display the fish, it is important that the room be completely dark.) Black lights can be readily purchased at many retail locations and will fit in many existing aquarium hood fixtures. For additional information on the best ways to display your fish, under black light, actinic light, and natural white light, please visit our GloFish® Display page. Please refer to our GloFish® Display page for tips on how to ensure that your fish are displayed as vividly and brilliantly as possible. GloFish® fluorescent fish are sold in retail locations across the country. Please click here to visit our GloFish store locator. Because inventories change relatively frequently, please check with your local retailer for details on availability and pricing. GloFish® are currently available in Starfire Red®, Sunburst Orange®, Electric Green®, Cosmic Blue® and Galactic Purple®. If you would like to see spectacular photos of our fish, please visit our GloFish® Photos page. Because fluorescent fish are unique, their sale is covered by a substantial number of patents and pending patent applications. The providers of GloFish® fluorescent fish, 5-D Tropical and Segrest Farms, are the only distributors that have the necessary licenses to produce and market fluorescent fish within the United States. The production of fluorescent fish by any other party, or the sale of any fluorescent fish not originally distributed by 5-D Tropical or Segrest Farms, is strictly prohibited. For additional information regarding GloFish® fluorescent fish license details please click here. GloFish® fluorescent fish are currently available for purchase only within the United States. We have no plans to ship our fish to other countries at this time, but we will update this web page if this status changes. At present, Australia, Canada, and Europe prohibit the marketing of any genetically modified organisms, including our tropical fluorescent fish, until they are cleared through an extremely complex and costly review process. For now, due to the time, expense, and uncertainty involved with the approval process, we have no plans to submit an application in either Canada or Europe.
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Electric Green GloFish Danio
(Danio rerio) Easy Peaceful 2" 5 gallons 64-76° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.5-7.5 Omnivore Selectively Bred Cyprinidae GloFish Community The Electric Green GloFish® Danio (Danio rerio) is a genetically modified Zebra Danio, that has been genetically modified with a fluorescent protein gene and selectively bred to enhance the naturally occurring but rare fluorescent coloration. Scientists were able to take the fluorescent protein genes which occurs naturally in some marine organisms and implant it into multiple species of freshwater tropical fish. GloFish® sold within the aquarium hobby today are bred from the offspring of fluorescent fish that were originally developed several years ago. Each new GloFish® fluorescent fish inherits its unique color directly from its parents, maintains the color throughout its life, and passes the color along to its offspring. Hobbyists should not confuse modern GloFish® with dyed or injected fish that were impregnated with a fluorescent dye below their skin. Dyed fish would lose their color over time, were generally less healthy due to the dying process and considered by many to be subjected to inhumane treatment. Electric Green GloFish® Danio do well in a diverse amount of aquarium environments ranging from simple desktop aquariums of a couple of gallons, all the way to large planted tropical aquariums. The natural habitat of Danio varies depending on seasonal rains as they spend the dry season in larger streams and tributaries, while venturing out into floodplains and smaller water ways during the wet season. They do not have specific aquarium decor requirements, but will appreciate the presence of plants, driftwood, rocks and other similar decor in order to give them someplace to retreat when threatened. Electric Green GloFish® Danio have only basic needs when it comes to filtration and water movement, with any aquarium designed to house tropical community fish being suitable. Tank mates should include other peaceful to semi-aggressive fish species that are not large enough to consider the them as food. Danio school in nature, thus they prefer to be kept in groups of 8 or more individuals. They will typically live longer if kept in groups or small schools and are generally considered more interesting to watch while swimming in tight groups. While Electric Green GloFish® Danio are genetically modified for appearance and selectively bred to enhance that appearance, they are just like Zebra Danio in terms of aquarium care, tank mates and feeding. Electric Green GloFish® Danio have the same feeding requirements as non-genetically modified Danio species. All Danio species are omnivorous, thus require a varied diet containing both meaty and vegetable matter. In the wild they are considered a micro predator since they prey on small insect larvae, crustaceans and other small invertebrates. They also consume algae and plant matter by picking at vegetation and decaying material on the substrate. Electric Green GloFish® Danio are very easy to feed in the aquarium environment and will readily consume a very wide variety of commercial foods. Their staple diet should consist of quality flake foods, freeze-dried foods, blood worms, tubifex worms, brine shrimp along with some frozen foods designed for tropical omnivores. They should be fed a couple of times per day an amount of food that they will consume within a couple of minutes. GloFish® fluorescent fish were originally bred to help detect environmental pollutants. By adding a natural fluorescence gene to the fish, scientists hope to one day quickly and easily determine when a waterway is contaminated. The first step in developing a pollution-detecting fish was to create fish that would be fluorescent all the time. Scientists soon realized that the public interest in sharing the benefits of this research, a process which lead to GloFish® fluorescent fish. For over a decade, fluorescent fish have been relied upon by scientists worldwide to better understand important questions in genetics, molecular biology, and vertebrate development. Fluorescent fish have been particularly helpful in understanding cellular disease and development, as well as cancer and gene therapy. The fluorescent color in our fish is produced by a fluorescent protein gene, which creates the beautiful fluorescence that can be seen when looking at the fish. The fluorescent protein genes occur naturally, and are derived from marine organisms. No. Today GloFish® fluorescent fish are bred from the offspring of fluorescent fish that were originally developed several years ago. Each new GloFish® fluorescent fish inherits its unique color directly from its parents, maintains the color throughout its life, and passes the color along to its offspring. To achieve their goal of helping to fight water pollution, scientists are hoping to one day develop a switch that will cause always-fluorescing fish to selectively fluoresce in the presence of environmental toxins. A non-fluorescing fish will signal that the water is safe, while a fluorescing fish will signal trouble. To help further the research, a portion of the proceeds from sales of all GloFish® fluorescent fish goes directly to the lab where these fish were originally created. For more information on this project, please review the article entitled (Zebrafish as Pollution Indicators,) by the National University of Singapore. Aside from their brilliant color, fluorescent fish are the same as their non-fluorescent counterparts. This includes everything from general care and temperature preferences to growth rate and life expectancy. No. The fish are as healthy as other fish in every way. Scientists originally developed them several years ago by adding a natural fluorescence gene to the fish eggs before they hatched. Today GloFish® fluorescent fish are bred from the offspring of these original fish. Every line of GloFish® fluorescent fish (i.e. Starfire Red®, Electric Green®, Sunburst Orange®, Cosmic Blue®, and Galactic Purple®) starts with a single fish. The general process of developing fluorescent fish, as illustrated in this chart, begins by adding a fluorescence gene to the fish before it hatches from its egg. Once the gene integrates into the genome (i.e., genetic code) of the embryo, the developing fish will be able to pass the fluorescence gene along to its offspring upon maturity. Because of this, the gene only needs to be added to one embryo; from that point forward, all subsequent fluorescent fish are the result of traditional breeding. Scientists all around the world are working with fluorescent fish, whether it is to help protect the environment or come up with new disease-fighting drug therapies. As more fluorescent fish become available, they may be offered for sale to the public. We have submitted detailed information regarding our fish to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, which has jurisdiction over biotech animals, as set forth here, as they consider the added gene to be an “animal drug”. Consistent with the findings of scientists worldwide, the FDA, working in coordination with the United States Department of Agriculture and United States Fish & Wildlife Service, found no evidence that our fluorescent fish pose any more threat to the environment than their non-fluorescent counterparts. If you would like to read the FDA statement regarding our zebrafish, please click here. In addition to the Federal review described above, our fish have been reviewed by various state agencies, including the Florida Division of Aquaculture and other state agencies. In accordance with the findings of the FDA, these reviews have concluded that our fluorescent fish are as safe for the environment as their non-fluorescent counterparts. To review their specific analyses, as well as those of independent third party experts, please see the GloFish® Science section of our website. GloFish® fluorescent fish are tropical fish and are unable to survive in non-tropical environments. Their non-fluorescent counterparts have been sold to aquarium owners worldwide for more than fifty years. Despite all these years of widespread distribution, they are only found in tropical environments. At the same time, please remember that GloFish® fluorescent fish are intended for use as aquarium fish only, and should never be intentionally released into the wild. For an animal in the wild, eating a fluorescent fish is the same as eating any other fish. Their fluorescence is derived from a gene that is already found in nature and is completely safe for the environment. Just as eating a blue fish would not turn a predator blue, eating a fluorescent fish would not make a predator fluoresce. Fluorescent fish absorb light and then re-emit it. This creates the perception that they are glowing, particularly when shining a black light on the fish in a dark room. For tips on the best way to display your fish, please visit our GloFish® Display page. In general, we have found that an actinic (blue wavelength) light is ideal, as this can be used in both light and dark rooms. This type of light can be found in most stores that sell aquarium fish. Another great option for a completely dark room is a standard 18 inch black light bulb, similar to the one pictured here. (For black light to optimally display the fish, it is important that the room be completely dark.) Black lights can be readily purchased at many retail locations and will fit in many existing aquarium hood fixtures. For additional information on the best ways to display your fish, under black light, actinic light, and natural white light, please visit our GloFish® Display page. Please refer to our GloFish® Display page for tips on how to ensure that your fish are displayed as vividly and brilliantly as possible. GloFish® fluorescent fish are sold in retail locations across the country. Please click here to visit our GloFish store locator. Because inventories change relatively frequently, please check with your local retailer for details on availability and pricing. GloFish® are currently available in Starfire Red®, Sunburst Orange®, Electric Green®, Cosmic Blue® and Galactic Purple®. If you would like to see spectacular photos of our fish, please visit our GloFish® Photos page. Because fluorescent fish are unique, their sale is covered by a substantial number of patents and pending patent applications. The providers of GloFish® fluorescent fish, 5-D Tropical and Segrest Farms, are the only distributors that have the necessary licenses to produce and market fluorescent fish within the United States. The production of fluorescent fish by any other party, or the sale of any fluorescent fish not originally distributed by 5-D Tropical or Segrest Farms, is strictly prohibited. For additional information regarding GloFish® fluorescent fish license details please click here. GloFish® fluorescent fish are currently available for purchase only within the United States. We have no plans to ship our fish to other countries at this time, but we will update this web page if this status changes. At present, Australia, Canada, and Europe prohibit the marketing of any genetically modified organisms, including our tropical fluorescent fish, until they are cleared through an extremely complex and costly review process. For now, due to the time, expense, and uncertainty involved with the approval process, we have no plans to submit an application in either Canada or Europe.
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Blue Danio
(Danio kerri) Easy Peaceful 2" 10 gallons 73-78° F, KH 5-12, pH 6.5-7.5 Omnivore Thailand Cyprinidae Danios Community Blue Danio (Danio kerri) originate from the slowly moving streams, tributaries and floodplains of southern Thailand. Both wild specimens and farm raised specimens are available to aquarium hobbyists fairly often. Blue Danio are sold under a variety of common names including: Blue Danio, Turquoise Danio, Danio kerri and Brachydanio kerri. The natural habitat of the Blue Danio is comprised of clear shallow water, gravel and rocky substrate and sparse submerged vegetation. Despite their natural habitat lacking dense submerged vegetation Blue Danio do very well in planted aquariums, as their small size and fluid swimming motion allow them to move effortlessly in and out of even the most densely planted aquariums. The Blue Danio is also one of the species whose appears benefits greatly from an aquarium with dark substrate and dense plantings, as this helps to bring out the much sought after blue coloration in the fish. The overall hardiness of the Blue Danio makes it suitable for beginning aquarium hobbyists and for a wide range of aquarium sizes and decor. The Blue Danio is a peaceful schooling species that does well in any peaceful community aquarium setup. They should be kept as a group of at least 6 individuals both to provide them a sense of security and because they are much more attractive when swimming in a tight group. In fact it is the ability of a group of Blue Danio darting in and out of dense vegetation that makes them such an impressive site within the aquarium. Tank mates should consist of other peaceful to semi-aggressive community fish species that are not large enough to see the Blue Danio as food. While not overly demanding in terms of water chemistry, aquarium size or decor, Blue Danio will prefer an aquarium that has clean well oxygenated water and moderate to strong water currents. With their relatively small adult size of just 2 inches and small biological impact, Blue Danio make an excellent schooling species for both larger and nano planted aquariums. In nature Blue Danio utilize their upturned mouths to feed on small insect larvae, worms, crustaceans and other similar prey that inhabit the shoreline and waters surface of their native streams. The bulk of their diet should come from meaty foods; however, they should also be provided commercial omnivore preparations, algae or plant based flakes. It is best to feed them a mix of commercial carnivore and omnivore flake foods, while mixing in some freeze-dried or frozen worms, daphnia, cyclopeeze, brine shrimp or other similar food items. Providing a varied diet will help ensure that they receive all the vitamins and minerals they need to maintain a healthy immune system. Sexing Blue Danio is similar to that of most Danio species in that the males are smaller and more slender, with the females being larger and significantly more rounded in appearance. Once the Blue Danio reaches its adult size of two inches the difference in gender is very easy to recognize, even to the beginning hobbyist. Blue Danio are prolific breeders and will readily spawn under a variety of aquarium conditions. Hobbyists need simply keep a male and a group of females in an aquarium with a gravel substrate and quality water conditions for them to spawn. The female will scatter her eggs on the substrate, while the male will fertilize them. Once hatched the adults should be removed and the fry fed baby brine shrimp or finely chopped meaty food pieces.
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Golden White Cloud
(Tanichthys albonubes) Easy Peaceful 2" 10 gallons 64-75° F; pH 6.0-8.0; dH 5-20 Omnivore Southeast China Cyprinidae Danios Community The Golden White Cloud (Tanichthys albonubes) is a color variant of the White Cloud species of Minnow/Danio originating from the White Cloud Mountain area of the Guangdong Province of southeastern China. Their native habitat consists of shallow heavily vegetated mountain streams. While the climate of southeastern China is very warm, the mountain streams the Golden White Clouds live in is fed from underground springs which keeps the temperature on the cooler side (between 54 and 75 degrees). Golden White Clouds have been a very popular species within the aquarium trade for decades, thus today they are almost exclusively imported from large fish farms in southeastern Asia. Farm breeding has actually helped to make the species more tolerant of the warmer water temperatures that most hobbyists keep their tropical aquariums. In addition to water temperature, farm bred specimens also tend to accept a wide variety of commercial foods and tank conditions. While the Golden White Cloud is hardy enough for beginning aquarium hobbyists, but still interesting enough in coloration and personality to be included in many advanced aquarist planted aquariums as well. Hobbyists should have little trouble finding White Clouds available for sale at either their LFS or online retailers. Golden White Clouds are fairly undemanding in terms of their aquarium requirements, with a moderately decorated 10 gallon aquarium being sufficient. Being a small schooling species in nature means that they have evolved to live in large groups. Both their social structure and their sense of security and protection is built around living in schools of individuals, thus it is highly recommended that hobbyists house them in groups of 8 or more individuals. Their coloration and pattern is such that a group of these fish swimming closely together makes for a very attractive and interesting sight. Single or paired individuals will not tend to swim as actively about the aquarium and will often simply hide much of the time. While not overly demanding in terms of water chemistry, aquarium size or decor, Golden White Clouds will prefer an aquarium that has plenty of plants (either live or fake) and moderate water currents. Keeping Golden White Clouds in an aquarium with a darker gravel substrate and lush vegetation, combined with a sizable group of fish will produce much more vivid coloration and active swimming behavior. With their relatively small adult size of just 2 inches and small biological impact, Golden White Clouds make an excellent schooling species for both larger and nano planted aquariums. They are a very peaceful species that will coexist with any other peaceful tropical fish species. Care should be exercised when keeping Golden White Clouds with larger semi-aggressive community species that are large enough to see them as food. In nature Golden White Clouds utilize their upturned mouths to feed on small insect larvae, worms, crustaceans and other similar prey that inhabit the dense vegetation of their native streams. The bulk of their diet should come from meaty foods; however, they should also be provided commercial omnivore preparations, algae or plant based flakes. It is best to feed them a mix of commercial carnivore and omnivore flake foods, while mixing in some freeze-dried or frozen worms, daphnia, cyclopeeze, brine shrimp or other similar food items. Providing a varied diet will help ensure that they receive all the vitamins and minerals they need to maintain a healthy immune system.
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White Cloud
(Tanichthys albonubes) Easy Peaceful 2" 10 gallons 64-75° F; pH 6.0-8.0; dH 5-20 Omnivore Southeast China Cyprinidae Danios Community The White Cloud (Tanichthys albonubes) species of Minnow/Danio originates from the White Cloud Mountain area of the Guangdong Province of southeastern China. Their native habitat consists of shallow heavily vegetated mountain streams. While the climate of southeastern China is very warm, the mountain streams the White Clouds live in is fed from underground springs which keeps the temperature on the cooler side (between 54 and 75 degrees). White Clouds have been a very popular species within the aquarium trade for decades, thus today they are almost exclusively imported from large fish farms in southeastern Asia. Farm breeding has actually helped to make the species more tolerant of the warmer water temperatures that most hobbyists keep their tropical aquariums. In addition to water temperature, farm bred specimens also tend to accept a wide variety of commercial foods and tank conditions. White Clouds are hardy enough for beginning aquarium hobbyists, but still interesting enough in coloration and personality to be included in many advanced aquarist planted aquariums as well. Hobbyists should have little trouble finding White Clouds available for sale at either their LFS or online retailers. White Clouds are fairly undemanding in terms of their aquarium requirements, with a moderately decorated 10 gallon aquarium being sufficient. Being a small schooling species in nature means that they have evolved to live in large groups. Both their social structure and their sense of security and protection is built around living in schools of individuals, thus it is highly recommended that hobbyists house them in groups of 8 or more individuals. Their coloration and pattern is such that a group of these fish swimming closely together makes for a very attractive and interesting sight. Single or paired individuals will not tend to swim as actively about the aquarium and will often simply hide much of the time. While not overly demanding in terms of water chemistry, aquarium size or decor, White Clouds will prefer an aquarium that has plenty of plants (either live or fake) and moderate water currents. Keeping White Clouds in an aquarium with a darker gravel substrate and lush vegetation, combined with a sizable group of fish will produce much more vivid coloration and active swimming behavior. With their relatively small adult size of just 2 inches and small biological impact, White Clouds make an excellent schooling species for both larger and nano planted aquariums. They are a very peaceful species that will coexist with any other peaceful tropical fish species. Care should be exercised when keeping White Clouds with larger semi-aggressive community species that are large enough to see them as food. In nature White Clouds utilize their upturned mouths to feed on small insect larvae, worms, crustaceans and other similar prey that inhabit the dense vegetation of their native streams. The bulk of their diet should come from meaty foods; however, they should also be provided commercial omnivore preparations, algae or plant based flakes. It is best to feed them a mix of commercial carnivore and omnivore flake foods, while mixing in some freeze-dried or frozen worms, daphnia, cyclopeeze, brine shrimp or other similar food items. Providing a varied diet will help ensure that they receive all the vitamins and minerals they need to maintain a healthy immune system.
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Glowlight Danio
(Danio choprae) Easy Peaceful 1.2" 20 gallons 72-79° F; pH 6.0-7.0; dH 2-10 Omnivore Myanmar Cyprinidae Danios Community Glowlight Danio (Danio choprae) originate from the small streams and river tributaries of the Ayeyarwady river basin in the southeast Asian country of Myanmar. They are plentiful and widespread throughout their home region, inhabiting everything from small fast flowing mountain streams to larger slower moving river tributaries. Their native habitat generally consists of a smooth gravel substrate littered with large rocks and rocky formations. The Glowlight Danio uses its small size to be able to dart in and out of the rocks, both for protection from predators and to hunt for insect larvae, small crustaceans and other similar foodstuffs. Glowlight Tetra will appreciate a stream based aqua scape withing the aquarium environment; however, they are a flexible species that would quickly adapt to a variety of aquarium decor. Male and female Glowlight Danio vary slightly in both shape and color, with females being slightly larger, rounder and more muted coloration. While this species was discovered in the 1920's, it has only been available in the aquarium hobby since the early 2000's. However, due to the ease of care and attractive coloration the Glowlight Danio has now become a popular mainstay within the aquarium hobby trade. In fact they are now commercially bred for the aquarium hobby due to their popularity and demand amongst aquarium hobbyists. Glowlight Danio will do well in a wide variety of tropical community aquariums setups and will coexist peacefully with a wide range of tank mates. Ideally they should be provided an aquarium that resembles their native habitat or at least provides them open swimming areas and enough decor to provide them places to retreat to when threatened. Ideal conditions will include a gravel substrate, larger rocks, driftwood and plants combined with open swimming areas. Glowlight Danio leap from the water in nature to avoid predators, thus they are prone to jumping from the aquarium as well. Hobbyists should fully cover the aquarium to prevent them from jumping out of the tank when startled. Being a native river based species the Glowlight Danio is accustomed to plenty of water movement; therefore, the addition of a powerhead or strong water return is recommended. The Glowlight Danio is a schooling species that really should be kept in good sized groups of at least 6 individuals. Keeping a social group of Glowlight Danio will help them feel more secure in the aquarium and will bring out better coloration as the males compete to impress the females in the group. Tank mates should consist of other peaceful community fish that are not so large as to see the smallish Glowlight Danio as a food source. Due to their overall small adult size of just over an inch, fish like Angels, Bala Sharks and many Catfish species will often prey on Glowlight Danio while they sleep. In the wild Glowlight Danio prey on small insects, insect larvae and tiny crustaceans that they find living in the gravel substrate and rocky shores of their native habitat. Glowlight Danio available in the aquarium trade these days are commercially bred and have been raised on commercial fish foods since birth. They will readily adapt to a wide variety of commercial fish foods including: quality flake foods, frozen preparations and freeze-dried foods. A proper diet should include a variety of foods with a quality staple flake food making up the bulk of the diet, with blood worms, tubifex worms, brine shrimp, cyclopeeze and other similar food items used to provide variety. It is best to feed them smaller meals 2 to 3 times per day, consisting of the amount of food that they will consume within just a few minutes.
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Zebra Danio
(Danio rerio) Easy Peaceful 3" 10 gallons 64-78° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.0-7.8 Omnivore Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh Cyprinidae Danios Community Zebra Danio (Danio rerio) have been a popular mainstay within the aquarium hobby for decades due to a combination of their attractive striped pattern, ease of care, active swimming style and widespread availability. They originate from the streams and tributaries of the mountains of Pakistan, India, Nepal and Bangladesh. However, they are now primarily raised on commercial fish farms in order to supply the demand from the aquarium hobby. Zebra Danio are excellent for beginning hobbyists due to their hardy nature, ability to tolerate a wide range of water parameters and overall ease of care and feeding. They are also popular because of their active swimming style and attractive striping. A group or small school of Zebra Danio swimming in and out of the plants or other aquarium decor is a very attractive sight to behold. Their small size and peaceful demeanor makes the Zebra Danio ideal for peaceful community aquariums, planted aquariums and nano or pico table top aquariums. The natural habitat of the Zebra Danio varies depending on seasonal rains as they spend the dry season in larger streams and tributaries, while venturing out into floodplains and smaller water ways during the wet season. They do not have specific aquarium decor requirements, but will appreciate the presence of plants, driftwood, rocks and other similar decor in order to give them someplace to retreat when threatened. Zebra Danio have only basic needs when it comes to filtration and water movement, with any aquarium designed to house tropical community fish being suitable. Tank mates should include other peaceful to semi-aggressive fish species that are not large enough to consider the Zebra Danio as food. Zebra Danio school in nature, thus they prefer to be kept in groups of 8 or more individuals. They will typically live longer if kept in groups or small schools and are generally considered more interesting to watch while swimming in tight groups. Being a omnivorous species the Zebra Danio needs a varied diet containing both meaty and vegetable matter. In the wild they are considered a micro predator since they prey on small insect larvae, crustaceans and other small invertebrates. They also consume algae and plant matter by picking at vegetation and decaying material on the substrate. Zebra Danio are very easy to feed in the aquarium environment and will readily consume a very wide variety of commercial foods. Their staple diet should consist of quality flake foods, freeze-dried foods, blood worms, tubifex worms, brine shrimp along with some frozen foods designed for tropical omnivores. They should be fed a couple of times per day an amount of food that they will consume within a couple of minutes.
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Ashley Gilbert
Emerald Dwarf Rasbora
(Microrasbora erythromicron) Moderate Peaceful 1" 20 gallons 68-76° F, KH 12-20, pH 7.0-8.0 Omnivore Myanmar Cyprinidae Danios Community The Emerald Dwarf Rasbora (Microrasbora erythromicron) is a shy schooling fish originating from the lakes of eastern Myanmar. Their natural lake habitat consists of relatively shallow water with dense vegetation and a fertile soil substrate. The Emerald Dwarf Rasbora is generally found near the lakes shoreline where it hunts for small invertebrates, insect larvae, algae and zooplankton. The dense vegetation around the lakes shoreline provides not only excellent hunting grounds, but also provides protection from large predatory fish species. This species is better suited for experienced freshwater aquarium hobbyists, as they are less tolerant of water chemistry changes and are more picky about their food sources than the average tropical community fish species. Emerald Dwarf Rasbora also require aquariums that replicate their natural environment in order for them to feel comfortable and thrive within the home aquarium. Both the aquarium environment and tank mates play an important role in successfully keeping the Emerald Dwarf Rasbora in the home aquarium. The aquarium should be either densely planted or contain areas of the aquarium that are densely planted. This will both better replicate the Emerald Dwarf Rasboras natural habitat, but also give them a place to retreat to when threatened and to escape more boisterous tank mates. Tank mates also play an important role due to the shy nature of the Emerald Dwarf Rasbora. They need tank mates that are similar in size and disposition as themselves; as well as, tank mates that are not overly boisterous swimmers or feeders. Due to the stable nature of their natural lake habitat, the Emerald Dwarf Rasbora is not very tolerant of rapidly fluctuating water parameters. They will do best in calm well planted aquariums with a neutral pH and stable low to mid 70°F water temperature. Lastly, it is important to house this species as a group of 6 or more individuals, as they are a schooling species and will not do well in a pair or as a solo specimen. In its natural habitat the Emerald Dwarf Rasbora feeds primarily on small invertebrates, insect larvae, small worms, algae and zooplankton. They need to be fed a varied diet that consists of both plant based and meaty foodstuffs. Emerald Dwarf Rasbora are known for being somewhat shy and picky feeders when first introduced to the aquarium environment. Also do to their small size, the Emerald Dwarf Rasbora should be fed foods that have a small particle size like daphnia, artemia, baby brine shrimp, cyclop-eeze, quality frozen foods and other similar fare. They should be fed 2 to 3 times daily an amount of food that they will consume within a few minutes. Their small physical size means that they will be unable to consume large quantities of food at a single feeding, and will much prefer to have smaller more frequent feedings.
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Celestial Pearl Danio
(Celestichthys margaritatus) Easy Peaceful 1" 10 gallons 73-79° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.5-7.5 Omnivore Burma / Myanmar Cyprinidae Danios Community In 2006 the freshwater aquarium hobby was introduced to a beautiful new species of Danio discovered in the ponds and calm waterways of the Salween basin in Burma or modern day Myanmar. The Celestial Pearl Danio or Galaxy Danio was an immediate hit with aquarists as its brilliant coloration, ease of care and suitability for community or planted aquariums made it an overnight success. The coloration of the Celestial Pearl Danio simply cannot be ignored with their light blue body and gold spots, transparent fins with red and black stripes and gold underbelly is simply a beautiful sight, which is even more impressive in schools of 6 to 10 individuals. Unfortunately their success in the aquarium hobby has put a serious strain on their wild populations as they live in a relatively small area and are being collected for the aquarium hobby faster than they can comfortably re-populate their numbers. Fortunately the Celestial Pearl Danio has been successfully bred within the aquarium hobby and many distributors are working on breeding programs to reduce or eliminate the pressure on this species in the wild. In the aquarium environment, the Celestial Pearl Danio is an ideal species for any planted or community aquarium as it brings an abundance of color and will get along with other community species well. Another plus for this species is that they are quite easy to care for as they will tolerate a variety of water temperatures and conditions, although they would prefer a water temperature around 78° F with a slightly alkaline pH. Celestial Pearl Danio are a small schooling species that should be kept in groups of at least 6 individuals with 8 or 10 individuals in the group being ideal. It is best to replicate a fish species natural environment within the aquarium, and for this species that means having an abundance of vegetation (preferably live plants) with some drift wood and rocks. In the wild this species lives in very calm water that is often spring fed or formed from overflows of other waterways, thus they should be kept in aquariums that do not have constant strong direct currents. Celestial Pearl Danio live in shallow water in the wild that has strong direct sunlight, so they do very well in strongly lit planted aquariums, and will use heavily planted areas in the aquarium or driftwood and rocks to retreat to if they feel threatened. The Celestial Pearl Danio is an omnivore that will eat virtually any standard topical fish foods available within the hobby. They will readily accept flaked foods, frozen preparations, vegetable or algae flakes and wafers along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex worms and brine shrimp. Essentially they will eat the same foods that would be being fed to the bulk of tropical freshwater species found in a tropical community aquarium.
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