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Leopard Cory
2 likes Cory Cats
(Corydoras leopardus) Easy Peaceful 3" 30 gallons 72-79° F, KH 3-12, pH 6.0-7.2 Omnivore Amazon basin in Brazil, Peru and Ecuador Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community Leopard Cory (Corydoras leopardus) are native to the rivers, streams and tributaries of the western Amazon basin ranging from Brazil over to Peru and Ecuador. They are a very peaceful species who live in large groups of dozens of individuals, both for safety and social interactions. They spend their days foraging amongst the leaf litter, vegetation and wood root covered areas of the river near the shoreline for a variety of meaty items like small worms, crustaceans and insect larvae. The Leopard Cory can be difficult to distinguish from a few other Cory Cats who all share some very similar visual traits. The four Cory Cat species who share very similar patterns include: Corydoras julii, C. leopardus, C. punctatus and C. trilineatus, all who share a large black mark on the dorsal fin, a barred caudal fin, horizontal striping along the body at the juncture of the dorsal and ventral lateral plates and a spotted body. In addition to similar markings, all of these species can also exhibit many variations in their pattern, which makes positive identification even more difficult. Beyond the pattern and markings, the easiest way to tell the Leopard Cory from the others is that it has a longer snout profile than the others. However, Leopard Cory's are generally more rare than the other similar species, so look closely and make sure you can positively identify the species before making a purchase. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. The native habitat of the Leopard Cory contains lots of tree roots, vegetation, a sandy substrate with a cover of fallen leaves. The jungle canopy that presides over their natural habitat creates many areas of diffused lighting and cooler mid 70s water temperatures. It is important to provide plenty areas within the aquarium that are shaded from the bright aquarium lights. They will absolutely appreciate the presence of driftwood, rocky caves and plenty of vegetation, which will provide them a tank that resembles their native home. Some important aquarium design elements when keeping Leopard Cory's is a sand or fine grain gravel substrate, plenty of internal water flow, areas of plants and wood root along with open swimming areas and locations in the aquarium where the fish can escape the bright aquarium lights. Like all cory cat species, Leopard Cory Cats will do much better when kept in social groups of at least 4 individuals of their own species or mixed with other cory cat species. While the Leopard Cory will gladly scavenge the aquarium substrate for leftover foodstuffs and decaying plant material, they should also be provided sinking foods designed for bottom dwelling fish species. While conditions that closely resemble their native habitat is also desirable, they are tolerant of a fairly wide range of aquarium conditions. Cory Cats are easily affected by poor water conditions, as they live right on the substrate where there is often less water flow and more decaying material and fish waste. As their native river and stream habitats have a constant flow of freshwater passing through, the home aquarium by contrast is much more of a closed ecosystem, which makes it more susceptible to adverse changes in water quality and chemistry if decaying matter is present within the aquarium. As with other Corydoras species, Corydoras leopardus is a communal species who will want to live in a group of Cory cats and not a single specimen. They would love nothing more than to live in a group of Corydoras leopardus, but will also happily coexist with other Corydoras species as well. They will do well with a wide variety of peaceful community fish tank mates ranging from the smallest Tetras, Rasboras and Barbs, all the way to larger peaceful Cichlid species like Geophagus, Blue Acara and Severum. Their diet should contain primarily meaty foods, with some plant based material in the form of pellets or flakes designed for omnivores. A diet that provides a variety of food items will help ensure that all the necessary vitamins and minerals the fish needs for a nutritionally complete diet and strong immune system are available. They are very easy to feed as they will readily take to a wide variety of commercial fish foods, algae and even decaying plant material. Some good food choices are freeze-dried bloodworms, black worms, sinking pellets, shrimp pellets, flake food, brine shrimp and frozen and live foods designed for freshwater tropical fish.
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Tracy Lee
Corydoras pantanalensis
(Corydoras pantanalensis) Easy Peaceful 3" 30 gallons 72-79° F, KH 5-12, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore Bolivian, Pantanal wetlands Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community Corydoras pantanalensis originate from the pristine, clear flowing waters of the Western Pantanal wetlands area located in Bolivia. Unlike the typical tannin tainted waters found throughout much of the Amazon, the Bolivian Pantanal wetlands is known for its crystal clear flowing waters and areas and dense vegetation. While many Corydoras species live in habitats characterized by dimly lit water ways underneath thick jungle canopies and tannin stained waters, the Corydoras pantanalensis is used to living in crystal clear water amongst dense vegetation and under bright sunlight. This makes the Corydoras pantanalensis a natural fit for the typical planted aquarium with its bright lighting and abundance of plants. The males and females differ in appearance with the males exhibiting a reticulated pattern when mature, while the females lack the reticulated pattern. Additionally, the females are larger than the males both in length and girth. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. The ideal aquarium environment for the Corydoras pantanalensis is one that closely resembles their native wetland habitat. Basically your typical planted aquarium consisting of a soft sandy substrate, areas of dense vegetation, open swimming areas and submerged wood or root along with typical planted aquarium lighting, would be ideal. Additionally, they will prefer aquariums that have plenty of water flow, which will both simulate their native environment and keep detritus and debris from building up on the substrate. Corydoras pantanalensis will absolutely love a well maintained standard planted aquarium or a very peaceful community fish aquarium. Quality water conditions are essential with this species as they are sensitive to deteriorating water conditions and high nitrates. As with all Cory Cats, do not use under gravel filtration and ensure the substrate receives some water flow and no large decaying items. Cory Cats are easily affected by poor water conditions, as they live right on the substrate where there is often less water flow and more decaying material and fish waste. As their native wetlands have a constant flow of freshwater passing through, the home aquarium by contrast is much more of a closed ecosystem, which makes it more susceptible to adverse changes in water quality and chemistry if decaying matter is present within the aquarium. As with other Corydoras species, Corydoras pantanalensis is a communal species who will want to live in a group of Cory cats and not a single specimen. They would love nothing more than to live in a group of Corydoras pantanalensis, but will also happily coexist with other Corydoras species as well. They will do well with a wide variety of peaceful community fish tank mates ranging from the smallest Tetras, Rasboras and Barbs, all the way to larger peaceful Cichlid species like Geophagus, Blue Acara and Severum. Their diet should contain primarily meaty foods, with some plant based material in the form of pellets or flakes designed for omnivores. A diet that provides a variety of food items will help ensure that all the necessary vitamins and minerals the fish needs for a nutritionally complete diet and strong immune system are available. They are very easy to feed as they will readily take to a wide variety of commercial fish foods, algae and even decaying plant material. Some good food choices are freeze-dried bloodworms, black worms, sinking pellets, shrimp pellets, flake food, brine shrimp and frozen and live foods designed for freshwater tropical fish.
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Panda Cory Cat
2 likes Cory Cats
(Corydoras panda) Easy Peaceful 2" 30 gallons 72-79° F, KH 1-12, pH 5.8-7.8 Omnivore South America, Amazon River basin Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community The Panda Cory Cat received its common name from the combination of its off-white base coloration and contrasting black marks over its eyes and just before its tail-fin, thus giving an appearance similar to that of a Giant Panda. Their peaceful disposition, attractive coloration and active personality has made the Panda Cory a popular staple within the aquarium hobby. The beneficial nature of Cory Cats to consume leftover food items and decaying plant material from the aquarium substrate makes them practically a must have for planted and community fish aquariums. Cory Cats are a communal species who live in substantially sized groups of up to 30 individuals in the wild. Within the aquarium environment it is best to keep them in groups of at least 4 to 6 individuals. This can be a mix of different Corydoras species or all of a single species. While they can be kept as a single specimen or a pair, they tend to not do nearly as well as when kept in groups and will generally have a far shorter lifespan. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. The ideal aquarium environment for the Panda Cory Cat is one that closely resembles their native jungle stream habitat. Basically your typical Amazon biotope consisting of a soft sandy substrate, areas of dense vegetation, open swimming areas and submerged wood or root along with some portions of the tank having filtered lighting, would be ideal. To achieve this setup, hobbyists will want to use a substrate of river sand or a small sized smooth gravel, utilize plenty of driftwood or tree root along with some low light ground cover plants like Java Ferns, Anubias or taller plants with larger leaves like Sword plants, which will filter the bright aquarium lights and complete the look. While their native habitat would have dried leaves littering the substrate, which would provide cover, filter sunlight and stain the water with brown tannins. This habitat is difficult to keep within the aquarium as it requires the hobbyist to remove the decaying leaves every few weeks to prevent the water from being fouled. As unlike their native streams which have a constant flow of freshwater passing through constantly, the home aquarium is much more of a closed ecosystem, which is more susceptible to adverse changes in water quality and chemistry if decaying matter is present within the aquarium. Panda Cory Cat will also do well in standard planted aquariums and very peaceful community aquariums. Quality water conditions are essential with this species as they are sensitive to deteriorating water conditions and high nitrates. As with all Cory Cats, do not use under gravel filtration and ensure the substrate receives some water flow and no large decaying items. Cory Cats are easily affected by poor water conditions, as they live right on the substrate where there is often less water flow and more decaying material and fish waste. The Panda Cory Cat is a foraging omnivore whose diet should contain a mixture of plant material and meaty foods, which combined will provide all the necessary vitamins and minerals they need for a proper diet and strong immune system. They are very easy to feed as they will readily take to a wide variety of commercial fish foods, algae and decaying plant material. Some good food choices are freeze-dried bloodworms, black worms, sinking pellets, shrimp pellets, flake food, brine shrimp and frozen and live foods designed for freshwater tropical fish.
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Ashley Gilbert
Horsemans Cory
(Corydoras eques) Easy Peaceful 2" 30 gallons 72-79° F, KH 1-12, pH 6.0-7.8 Omnivore South America, Amazon River basin Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community Corydoras eques, or as it is commonly referred to as the Horsemans Cory, is found living in numerous small streams and tributaries across the northern Amazon from Peru to western Brazil. Both the scientific and common name for this species was inspired by the large saddle shaped dark greenish brown body marking found on either side of their body. The Latin word eques means (horseman, rider or knight), with the common name Horsemans Cory being the name that this species is most commonly referred to within the aquarium hobby. Cory Cats are a communal species who live in substantially sized groups of up to 30 individuals in the wild. Within the aquarium environment it is best to keep them in groups of at least 4 to 6 individuals. This can be a mix of different Corydoras species or all of a single species. While they can be kept as a single specimen or a pair, they tend to not do nearly as well as when kept in groups and will generally have a far shorter lifespan. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. The ideal aquarium environment for the Horsemans Cory is one that closely resembles their native jungle stream habitat. Basically your typical Amazon biotope consisting of a soft sandy substrate, areas of dense vegetation, open swimming areas and submerged wood or root along with some portions of the tank having filtered lighting, would be ideal. To achieve this setup, hobbyists will want to use a substrate of river sand or a small sized smooth gravel, utilize plenty of driftwood or tree root along with some low light ground cover plants like Java Ferns, Anubias or taller plants with larger leaves like Sword plants, which will filter the bright aquarium lights and complete the look. While their native habitat would have dried leaves littering the substrate, which would provide cover, filter sunlight and stain the water with brown tannins. This habitat is difficult to keep within the aquarium as it requires the hobbyist to remove the decaying leaves every few weeks to prevent the water from being fouled. As unlike their native streams which have a constant flow of freshwater passing through constantly, the home aquarium is much more of a closed ecosystem, which is more susceptible to adverse changes in water quality and chemistry if decaying matter is present within the aquarium. Alternatively, Horsemans Cory Cats also do well in standard planted aquariums and very peaceful community aquariums. Quality water conditions are essential with this species as they are sensitive to deteriorating water conditions and high nitrates. As with all Cory Cats, do not use under gravel filtration and ensure the substrate receives some water flow and no large decaying items. Cory Cats are easily affected by poor water conditions, as they live right on the substrate where there is often less water flow and more decaying material and fish waste. The Horsemans Cory is a foraging omnivore whose diet should contain a mixture of plant material and meaty foods, which combined will provide all the necessary vitamins and minerals they need for a proper diet and strong immune system. They are very easy to feed as they will readily take to a wide variety of commercial fish foods, algae and decaying plant material. Some good food choices are freeze-dried bloodworms, black worms, sinking pellets, shrimp pellets, flake food, brine shrimp and frozen and live foods designed for freshwater tropical fish.
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Palespotted Cory Cat
(Corydoras gossei) Easy Peaceful 2" 30 gallons 72-79° F, KH 1-12, pH 6.0-7.0 Omnivore Brazil Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community Palespotted Cory Cats (Corydoras gossei) are found living in smaller river tributaries in Brazil near the rivers Mamore and Rondonia. In captivity the Palespotted Cory does best in very peaceful community tanks that do not contain any fish species that are very large or aggressive. Good tank mates include small characins, cyprinids, anabantoids, dwarf cichlids and other similarly peaceful species. Always try to maintain Cory Cats in groups as they are far more comfortable and confident in the presence of conspecifics. In most aquariums they should ideally be kept in a group of at least six individuals, with a group of at least 3 individuals in smaller aquarium setups. Palespotted Cory Cats do a great job of keeping the aquarium substrate free of excess foods and decaying plant material; as well as, provide plenty of activity at the substrate level of the tank. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. The ideal aquarium environment for the Palespotted Cory is one that closely resembles their native tropical river habitat. Basically your typical Amazon biotope setup would be ideal. To achieve this setup hobbyists will want to use a substrate of river sand or a small sized smooth gravel. Plenty of driftwood or tree root along with some low light ground cover plants like java ferns will complete the look. Ideally dried leaves would be allowed to stain the water and litter the substrate, while this is closer to their natural habitat, it requires the hobbyist to remove the decaying leaves every few weeks to prevent the water from being fouled. Lastly, dim lighting or areas of filtered lighting will complete the look of a tropical stream underneath the cover of a dense jungle tree canopy. Alternatively, Palespotted Cory Cats also do well in standard planted aquariums and very peaceful community aquariums. Quality water conditions are essential with this species as they are sensitive to deteriorating water conditions and high nitrates. As with all corys, do not use under gravel filtration and ensure the substrate receives some water flow and no large decaying items. Cory Cats are easily affected by poor water conditions, as they live right on the substrate where there is often less water flow and more decaying material and fish waste. The Palespotted Cory Cat is an omnivorous species that will require a mixture of plant material and meaty foods in their diet in order to provide them all the necessary vitamins and minerals they need. They are very easy to feed as they will readily take to a wide variety of commercial fish foods, algae and decaying plant material. Some good food choices are freeze-dried bloodworms and tubifex, sinking pellets, shrimp pellets, flake food, brine shrimp, frozen and live foods designed for freshwater tropical fish.
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Swartz's Cory Cat
(Corydoras schwartzi) Easy Peaceful 2" 30 gallons 72-79° F, KH 2-12, pH 5.8-7.0 Omnivore South America Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community Swartz's Cory Cats are native to the streams and tributaries of South America, where they can be found living along river banks and river beds. They spend the vast majority of their time dwelling about the river bottom looking for detritus, leftover meaty foods and decaying plant matter that have made their way to the river bottom. The Swartz's Cory is an attractive species that has a silver body and two distinct black horizontal stripes that run from just behind the gill plate to the tail. The eyes are also covered with a black stripe and the head area is tan in color. The Swartz's Cory Cats coloration and pattern help it blend into the substrate, which helps the cory cat avoid larger predators. Swartz's Cory Cats live in large social groups in the wild and prefer to live in groups within the aquarium environment as well. It is recommended to keep at least a small group of 4 or more cory cats in the aquarium to satisfy their social requirements. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. Aquariums housing Swartz's Cory Cats should contain plenty of vegetation, areas of diffused lighting and a sandy or smooth gravel substrate. It is important to provide plenty of areas within the aquarium that are shaded from the bright aquarium lights. They will absolutely appreciate the presence of lush vegetation, driftwood and rocky caves in order to provide them a tank that resembles their native habitat. Like all cory cat species, the Swartz's Cory Cat will do much better when kept in social groups of at least 4 individuals of their own species or mixed with other cory cat species. While the Swartz's Cory Cat will gladly scavenge the aquarium substrate for leftover foodstuffs and decaying plant material, they should also be provided sinking foods designed for bottom dwelling fish species. Swartz's Cory Cats are scavengers that need to eat a wide variety of foods that include both plant and meaty foods. In the wild they typically feed on small worms, benthic crustaceans, insects and decaying animal and plant matter that has settled on the river bed. In the aquarium environment the Swartz's Cory Cat will readily accept a variety of meaty and vegetable matter foodstuffs including: flake, freeze-dried, frozen, live foods and pellets. This species is an excellent scavenger that will work to keep the aquarium substrate clean of excess foodstuffs and some decaying plant matter. While this species is an excellent scavenger, supplemental foods such as bloodworms, tubifex, flake food, or sinking carnivore pellets should be offered to ensure proper nutrition.
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Skunk Cory
(Corydoras arcuatus) Easy Peaceful 2" 20 gallons 71-79° F, KH 2-25, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore Amazon, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Northern Brazil Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community Skunk Cory (Corydoras arcuatus) are native to the upper Amazon basin where they are found in many small streams and floodplains during the rainy season. Their popularity within the aquarium hobby has caused them to be bred commercially in fish farms in the southern United States and in southeast Asia. Most Skunk Cory specimens found in the aquarium hobby currently originate from fish farms, which reduces strains on native populations. Captive bred fish also tend to adapt to aquarium life much more easily than wild caught specimens. The Skunk Cory is a peaceful community fish that should really be kept in groups of individuals as they live this way in nature. It is recommended that they Cory social groups be made up of 6 or more individuals of either all Skunk Cory or mixed with other Cory Cat species. They are ideally suited for peaceful tropical community aquariums, planted aquariums and of course Amazon biotope aquariums. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. Skunk Cory Cats native habitat contains lots of tree root, a sandy substrate with a cover of fallen leaves. The jungle canopy that presides over their natural habitat creates many areas of diffused lighting and cooler mid 70s water temperatures. It is important to provide plenty areas within the aquarium that are shaded from the bright aquarium lights. They will absolutely appreciate the presence of driftwood, rocky caves and some vegetation, which will provide them a tank that resembles their native habitat. Some important aquarium design elements when keeping Skunk Corys is a sand or fine grain gravel substrate, plenty of internal water flow, areas of plants and wood root along with open swimming areas and locations in the aquarium where the fish can escape the bright aquarium lights. While Skunk Cory Cats will gladly scavenge the aquarium substrate for leftover foodstuffs and decaying plant material, they should also be provided sinking foods designed for bottom dwelling fish species. While conditions that closely resemble their native habitat is also desirable, Skunk Cory Cats are tolerant of a fairly wide range of aquarium conditions. Skunk Cory feed by scavenging the aquarium substrate for both meaty and vegetable based foods. They will receive a portion of their diet scavenging foods fed to other fish in the aquarium, but that end up on the bottom of the aquarium. However, in most aquariums scavenging should not make up 100% of their diet. They should be fed sinking pellet foods designed for omnivores. Hobbyists can also feed Cory Cats flake and freeze-dried foods as long as they make it to the aquarium substrate. Skunk Corys will also enjoy live or frozen blood worms, brine shrimp or other similar food items as either a treat or supplement to their diet. In larger aquariums that are heavily fed for a large fish populations, Cory Cats can be target fed just once a day as they will make up the remainder of their diet via scavenging. In smaller aquariums with lighter fish loads and feedings, it is best to feed sinking foods twice per day. Monitor the overall girth and health of all bottom feeders and adjust feedings accordingly.
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Sterba's Cory Cat
(Corydoras sterbai) Easy Peaceful 3" 30 gallons 70-79° F, KH 2-15, pH 6.0-7.8 Omnivore Brazil, Amazon, South America Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community Sterba's Cory Cats live in the streams and tributaries of Brazil and northern portions of South America, where they can be found living along river banks and river beds. They spend the vast majority of their time dwelling about the river bottom looking for both meaty of plant foods that have made their way to the river bottom. The Sterba's Cory has a light silver/blue body with a darker spotted pattern that runs over the whole body. The Sterba's Cory coloration and pattern help it blend into the substrate, which helps the cory cat avoid larger predators. Sterba's Cory Cats live in large social groups in the wild and prefer to live in groups within the aquarium environment as well. It is recommended to keep at least a small group of 4 or more cory cats in the aquarium to satisfy their social requirements. Overall a very peaceful species that will be right at home in a peaceful community aquarium with other smaller peaceful fish species. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. Sterba's Cory Cats native habitat contains lots of tree root, a sandy substrate with a cover of fallen leaves. The jungle canopy that presides over their natural habitat creates many areas of diffused lighting and cooler mid 70s water temperatures. It is important to provide plenty areas within the aquarium that are shaded from the bright aquarium lights. They will absolutely appreciate the presence of driftwood, rocky caves and some vegetation, which will provide them a tank that resembles their native habitat. Some important aquarium design elements when keeping Sterba's Corys is a sand or fine grain gravel substrate, plenty of internal water flow, areas of plants and wood root along with open swimming areas and locations in the aquarium where the fish can escape the bright aquarium lights. Like all cory cat species, Sterba's Cory will do much better when kept in social groups of at least 4 individuals of their own species or mixed with other cory cat species. While the Sterba's Cory Cat will gladly scavenge the aquarium substrate for leftover foodstuffs and decaying plant material, they should also be provided sinking foods designed for bottom dwelling fish species. While conditions that closely resemble their native habitat is also desirable, Sterba's Cory Cats are tolerant of a fairly wide range of aquarium conditions. Sterba's Cory feed by scavenging the aquarium substrate for both meaty and vegetable based foods. They will receive a portion of their diet scavenging foods fed to other fish in the aquarium, but that end up on the bottom of the aquarium. However, in most aquariums scavenging should not make up 100% of their diet. They should be fed sinking pellet foods designed for omnivores. Hobbyists can also feed Cory Cats flake and freeze-dried foods as long as they make it to the aquarium substrate. Sterba's Corys will also enjoy live or frozen blood worms, brine shrimp or other similar food items as either a treat or supplement to their diet. In larger aquariums that are heavily fed for a large fish populations, Cory Cats can be target fed just once a day as they will make up the remainder of their diet via scavenging. In smaller aquariums with lighter fish loads and feedings, it is best to feed sinking foods twice per day. Monitor the overall girth and health of all bottom feeders and adjust feedings accordingly.
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Bandit Cory
(Corydoras metae) Easy Peaceful 2" 20 gallons 72-78° F, KH 2-15, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore Colombia, South America Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community Bandit Cory Cats are endemic to the streams and tributaries of Colombia and portions of northern South America, where they can be found living along river banks and river beds. They spend the vast majority of their time dwelling about the river bottom looking for both meaty of plant foods that have made their way to the river bottom. The Bandit Cory has a silver body with a black stripe running vertically over its eye and another running horizontally from the dorsal fin to the tail. The Bandit Cory Cats coloration and pattern help it blend into the substrate, which helps the cory cat avoid larger predators. Bandit Cory Cats live in large social groups in the wild and prefer to live in groups within the aquarium environment as well. It is recommended to keep at least a small group of 4 or more cory cats in the aquarium to satisfy their social requirements. Overall a very peaceful species that will be right at home in a peaceful community aquarium with other smaller peaceful fish species. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. Bandit Cory Cats native habitat contains lots of tree root, a sandy substrate with a cover of fallen leaves. The jungle canopy that presides over their natural habitat creates many areas of diffused lighting and cooler mid 70s water temperatures. It is important to provide plenty areas within the aquarium that are shaded from the bright aquarium lights. They will absolutely appreciate the presence of driftwood, rocky caves and some vegetation, which will provide them a tank that resembles their native habitat. Like all cory cat species, the Bandit Cory Cat will do much better when kept in social groups of at least 4 individuals of their own species or mixed with other cory cat species. While the Bandit Cory Cat will gladly scavenge the aquarium substrate for leftover foodstuffs and decaying plant material, they should also be provided sinking foods designed for bottom dwelling fish species. Bandit Cory Cats are less tolerant of poor water conditions than many cory cat species, thus they should be housed in water with low nutrient levels and plenty of dissolved oxygen. Bandit Cory Cats are scavengers that need to eat a wide variety of foods that include both plant and meaty foods. In the wild they typically feed on small worms, benthic crustaceans, insects and decaying animal and plant matter that has settled on the river bed. In the aquarium environment the Bandit Cory Cat will readily accept a variety of meaty and vegetable matter foodstuffs including: flake, freeze-dried, frozen, live foods and pellets. This species is an excellent scavenger that will work to keep the aquarium substrate clean of excess foodstuffs and some decaying plant matter. While this species is an excellent scavenger, supplemental foods such as bloodworms, tubifex, flake food, or sinking carnivore pellets should be offered to ensure proper nutrition.
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Nanus Cory Cat
(Corydoras nanus) Easy Peaceful 2.5" 20 gallons 72-79° F, KH 2-12, pH 5.8-7.0 Omnivore South America Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community Nanus Cory Cats are native to the streams and tributaries of South America, where they can be found living along river banks and river beds. They spend the vast majority of their time dwelling about the river bottom looking for both meaty of plant foods that have made their way to the river bottom. The Nanus is silver with a series of black stripes running horizontally from the back of the head to the tail. They at times exhibit slight amber and purple highlights and have a pale gray belly. The Nanus Cory Cats coloration and pattern help it blend into the substrate, which helps the cory cat avoid larger predators. Nanus Cory Cats live in large social groups in the wild and prefer to live in groups within the aquarium environment as well. It is recommended to keep at least a small group of 4 or more cory cats in the aquarium to satisfy their social requirements. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. Aquariums housing Nanus Cory Cats should contain plenty of vegetation, areas of diffused lighting and a sandy or smooth gravel substrate. It is important to provide plenty areas within the aquarium that are shaded from the bright aquarium lights. They will absolutely appreciate the presence of lush vegetation, driftwood and rocky caves in order to provide them a tank that resembles their native habitat. Like all cory cat species, the Nanus Cory Cat will do much better when kept in social groups of at least 4 individuals of their own species or mixed with other cory cat species. While the Nanus Cory Cat will gladly scavenge the aquarium substrate for leftover foodstuffs and decaying plant material, they should also be provided sinking foods designed for bottom dwelling fish species. Nanus Cory Cats are scavengers that need to eat a wide variety of foods that include both plant and meaty foods. In the wild they typically feed on small worms, benthic crustaceans, insects and decaying animal and plant matter that has settled on the river bed. In the aquarium environment the Nanus Cory Cat will readily accept a variety of meaty and vegetable matter foodstuffs including: flake, freeze-dried, frozen, live foods and pellets. This species is an excellent scavenger that will work to keep the aquarium substrate clean of excess foodstuffs and some decaying plant matter. While this species is an excellent scavenger, supplemental foods such as bloodworms, tubifex, flake food, or sinking carnivore pellets should be offered to ensure proper nutrition.
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