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Asian Rummynose
1 like Barbs
(Sawbwa resplendens) Moderate Peaceful 1" 20 gallons 68-76°&bsp;F, pH 6.8-7.8, KH 12-20 Omnivore Myanmar, Southeast Asia Cyprinidae Barbs Community The Asian Rummynose (Sawbwa resplendens) originates from the Inle Lake region of Myanmar, where they are found both in the lake itself and surrounding slow-moving steams. They are a schooling species that utilize large schools of individuals to help protect themselves from other larger fish species that would seem them as food. They also inhabit heavily vegetated areas where they can use the dense vegetation to help protect them from predators. Despite its common name, the Asian Rummynose has no scientific relationship to the South American Rummynose Tetra or True Rummynose Tetra. In fact the Asian Rummynose is a Cyprinidae species that is more closely related to Barbs than Tetra or Rasbora. It is highly recommended that hobbyists keep this species in groups of at least 6 individuals, with 10 or more being even more beneficial. The reason for this is that the species has developed as a school based species and depends on a group of individuals in order to feel secure and to be able to socialize properly. Socialization occurs between males and females and in-between males competing for female attention. Hobbyists who keep smaller groups of Asian Rummynose will want to keep more females than males in order to avoid aggression issues, while hobbyists with large schools (20 or more) should not run into any socialization issues. A proper aquarium setup for housing Asian Rummynose should have plenty of vegetation, areas in the aquarium that are shaded or dimly lit and low to moderate water flow. The aquarium should ideally be planted with plenty of ground cover and mid-level plants and driftwood, which will provide the Asian Rummynose with hiding places that will allow them to feel secure and comfortable. Floating plants and plants that grow to the surface and then cover the surface are ideal for filtering strong aquarium lighting and create areas within the tank that are more dimly lit. While Asian Rummynose appreciate dense vegetation, they are also a shoaling species that will require adequate room for a large group of individuals to swim about in. Aquariums with both areas of thick vegetation and open areas are ideal. Since Asian Rummynose only reach an adult size of approximately 1 inch in length, they should only be housed with smaller, peaceful community species that will not bully them or see them as a food source. As an omnivore, their diet in the wild consists of both animal and plant material including small insects, larvae, small crustaceans and zooplankton. Asian Rummynose adjust quickly to commercial aquarium foods and will readily accept a wide range of foods. They should be fed a variety of foods in order to provide them with a wide range of nutrients and minerals to help maintain a strong immune system. Ideal commercial foods include crushed flake foods, daphnia, brine shrimp, blood worms, cyclop-eeze and other similar items. They will also consume small bits of algae from rock or plant surfaces; however, this is only a very small portion of their overall diet. Feed daily 2 to 3 times per day a small amount of food that they will consume within a couple of minutes.
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Checkered Barb
1 like Barbs
(Puntius oligolepis) Easy Peaceful 2" 30 gallons 68-78° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore Indonesia Cyprinidae Barbs Community Checkered Barbs (Puntius oligolepis) originate from Indonesia, where they are found in small rivers, streams and drainage ditches. While abundant in their native habitat, specimens found in the aquarium hobby are almost always farm raised. The ease at which Checkered Barbs adapt to the aquarium environment has made commercial breeding more cost effective than wild collection and eliminates the pressure that collection places on wild communities. Checkered Barbs are ideal for beginning hobbyists as they adapt well to aquarium life, are peaceful towards other fish species and can tolerate a wide range of water conditions. Being a schooling species, hobbyists should consider keeping a group of 6 or more individuals if possible in order to allow the fish to live as they would in nature. Overall this species is ideal for any community or planted aquarium. Commercially bred Checkered Barbs tend to vary between two color types, one with a red coloration and the other a more greenish coloration. Both color morphs are attractive and both allow for the checkered scale pattern to show through. The Checkered barb is a hardy species that can be kept in community aquariums with other non-aggressive community fish species. They generally require plenty of open swimming room, but can also do well in aquariums with dense vegetation provided some swimming room in front or over top the plants. Ideally they will prefer an aquarium setup that provides them with both open swimming areas and locations that are shaded from the aquarium lights by plants, driftwood or other similar aqua-scaping. Checkered Barbs are one of the fish species that will benefit greatly from a dark substrate, as it will cause them to exhibit a more brilliant coloration. In regards to aquarium conditions, the most important thing to keep in mind is to provide clean well oxygenated water and a good biological filtration system. In the wild Checkered Barbs primarily forage for algae, diatoms, small insects and crustaceans, worms and decaying plant matter. However, they will quickly adapt to commercial aquarium foods. Recommended aquarium foods include: quality flake foods, freeze-dried blood worms and tubifex worms, brine shrimp, dried algae and frozen foods designed for freshwater omnivores. Checkered Barbs will also consume naturally occurring algae within the aquarium and decaying plant matter if kept in an aquarium with live plants. They should be fed a couple of times a day an amount of food that they will eagerly consume within a few minutes. Monitor the overall girth of the fish and adjust feeding frequency accordingly.
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Rosy Barb
1 like Barbs
(Puntius conchonius) Easy Semi-aggressive 4" 30 gallons 62-76° F, KH 4-20, pH 6.0-7.8 Omnivore Pakistan, India, Nepal and Bangladesh Cyprinidae Barbs Community Rosy Barbs (Puntius conchonius) originate from the southeastern countries of Pakistan, India, Nepal and Bangladesh. They are found living in a wide variety of habitats including: streams, river tributaries, ponds, lakes and flood plains. Rosey Barbs are actually quite tolerant of a wide range of water conditions and environments, which explains their widespread distribution. They do prefer cooler water temperates ranging from the low to mid 60's up to mid 70's, along with plenty of dissolved oxygen within the water. While the Rosy Barb is found in a variety of habitats, it's primary habitat is that of the cooler flowing mountainous streams and rivers found across Pakistan, India and Nepal. However, Rosy Barbs are quite easy to breed and due to their popularity within the aquarium hobby they are widely bred both within Asia and the United States. Most all Rosy Barbs found within the aquarium trade today are bred on fish farms, which helps reduce their cost and better acclimates them to the aquarium environment. The Rosy Barb makes a great addition to a wide variety of tropical community and river biotope aquariums. The male Rosy Barb exhibits more red coloration over a silver body, while the female is mostly all metallic silver/gold in coloration. Since Rosy Barbs are prolific breeders, commercial breeders have begun to selectively breed them in order to produce strains with very bright red coloration and with more of the red coloration spread out over the entirety of the fishes body. They are very easy to care for and can tolerate a wide variety of water conditions. However, they are a schooling species that really should be kept in groups of six or more individuals in order to maintain their natural schooling behaviors. While they are more than capable of adapting to a wide range of aquarium setups, Rosy Barbs will appreciate aquariums with plenty of water flow, dissolved oxygen and more temperate water temperatures in the mid 70's. Suitable tank mates include any peaceful to semi-aggressive tropical species larger than 1 to 1/2 inches and not large enough to see the Rosy Barb as food. Rosy Barbs are a very active species that when kept in groups will be more than happy to keep amongst themselves and will live peacefully in both community and planted community aquariums. Rosy Barbs are very generalized feeders that will consume a wide variety of foodstuffs including both plant and animal matter. It is important that the hobbyist feed them preparations designed for omnivores so that they are receive the full range of vitamins and minerals that their immune system requires to maintain proper health. Their staple diet should consist of commercial omnivore flake or frozen foods designed for tropical fish species. They should also be offered items like blood worms, tubifex worms, cyclopeeze, brine shrimp, etc. in addition to their staple flake food diet. Feed at least 2 times per day an amount of food that the fish will readily consume within a few minutes, then monitor the overall girth of the fish to determine whether to increase or decrease feeding frequency.
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Clown Barb
1 like Barbs
(Puntius everetti) Easy Peaceful 6" 55 gallons 75-85° F, KH 2-10, pH 6.0-7.0 Omnivore Southeast Asia, Malaysia, Indonesia Cyprinidae Barbs Community Clown Barbs (Puntius everetti) originate from the streams and tributaries of Malaysia, Borneo and Indonesia, where they inhabit the heavily vegetated streams that are common throughout the tropical jungles of the region. They are a schooling species that swim in large groups to help protect themselves from larger predatory fish species. They are accustomed to living in groups and will nip at each other as they swim about as a form of communication and awareness of their school mates. While the Clown Barb is perfectly OK with this behavior and not adversely effected, other more docile fish species may find this behavior stressful. This behavior is not a problem if they are kept in groups of 6 or more individuals as the barbs will nip amongst themselves and leave other tank mates alone. Overall the Clown Barb is a very undemanding species that will readily adjust to a fairly wide range of foods, water conditions and tank mates. Ideally they should be housed in peaceful community aquariums with other community fish that are similar in size and disposition to themselves. Aquariums that replicate their natural environment both in decor and water conditions are also ideal. Make sure to have plenty of plants in the aquarium and areas of diffused lighting either via tall plants, floating plants or large pieces of driftwood. Clown Barbs will often nibble on a variety of plant species, thus they do best in planted aquariums with fast growing and hardy plant species. Quality filtration and additional internal water flow via a powerhead or canister spray bar is recommended, as this will more closely emulate their natural habitat. In the wild the Clown Barb will consume a mix of plant and animal based foods ranging from algae to worms, insects and small crustaceans. In order to provide them with a balanced nutritional diet, the aquarium hobbyist should make sure that they have a mixture of both plant and meaty based foods in their diet. They are not picky eaters and will readily consume a large variety of commercially available foods including: high quality flake, small pellet foods, frozen foods, freeze-dried worms, bloodworms, tubifex worms, brine shrimp and other similar foodstuffs. While commercial dry foods are more than enough to provide the Clown Barb a quality staple diet, foods like frozen krill, brine shrimp and blood worms will bring out their best possible coloration. Most hobbyists mix in the more expensive live and frozen foods twice a week and use quality dry commercial foods the rest of the time.
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Tinfoil Barb
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(Barbonymus schwanenfeldii) Easy Peaceful 14" 70 gallons 74-82° F, KH 4-10, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore Southeast Asia Cyprinidae Barbs Community The Tinfoil Barb (Barbonymus schwanenfeldii) originates from the larger rivers and surrounding floodplains of the southeast Asian countries of Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia and Laos. They live predominately in the larger rivers where they are found in very large schools; however, they will venture off into floodplains during the rainy season and retreat back to the river as flood waters begin to recede. The body shape and swimming style of the Tinfoil Barb is indicative of the flowing waters of their natural river habitat. This species is often mixed in with the smaller Red-tailed Tinfoil barb (Barbonymus altus), which grows to about 10 inches instead of about 14 inches of B. schwanenfeldii. Most hobbyists purchase fish as juveniles which makes it difficult to determine the difference between B. schwanenfeldii and B. altus Tinfoil Barbs, as they cannot use the adult size as a means of comparison. The best way to differentiate juvenile forms of Barbonymus schwanenfeldii and Barbonymus altus is to compare the caudal (tail) fin of the fish. Barbonymus schwanenfeldii possesses a distinct black stripe along each lobe of this fin whereas Barbonymus altus does not. Additionally adult specimens of Barbonymus altus tend to exhibit an overall golden/bronze hue to the body when compared with the more silvery Barbonymus schwanenfeldii. Tinfoil Barb live in large schools in nature and generally do not do well when kept singularly or in low numbers in the aquarium. They tend to become more easily frightened and aggressive when not kept in groups. Hobbyists should keep Tinfoil Barb in groups of at least 4 or more individuals in aquariums large enough to support a group of adult fish. While Tinfoil Barbs are not an aggressive species, they are a boisterous species that will swim actively throughout the aquarium. Due to their active nature and aggressive feeding behavior, they may not be suitable for aquariums containing small shy community species. However, they do well with a wide range of tank mates ranging from larger community fish species to semi-aggressive Cichlids and Catfish species. Tinfoil Barbs originate from a river habitat that contains plenty of water flow along with areas of open swimming room and some rocks, plants and tree root. They do best in larger aquariums that have both strong water currents and excellent biological filtration. As with most river species, the Tinfoil Barb is accustomed to a high turnover in water volume which generally means that organic buildup is kept low. They are however quite hardy and can tolerate less than perfect water conditions better than many other river based species. Due to their size and healthy appetite it is recommended that a large canister filter or wet/dry filter be used in order to maintain water quality. An additional powerhead is also recommended in order to create plenty of water flow within the aquarium. The aquarium decor should contain a mixture of open swimming areas and clusters of plants, rocks or tree root in order to give the fish a place to retreat to if they feel threatened. Tinfoil Barbs are easy to feed since they will consume a wide variety of meaty or plant based foods. In the wild they are considered an opportunistic feeder, that will consume smaller fish, algae, small invertebrates, plant matter and even organic detritus. They are just as easily fed in the aquarium environment and will eagerly accept flake, frozen, pellet, freeze-dried or live foods. While the Tinfoil Barb is willing to eat all day long, they should be fed two times per day in most cases in order to control their growth and girth. They should be fed a varied diet containing both plant and animal matter in order to provide balanced nutrition. Tinfoil Barb can cause problems when trying to feed more shy species, as they feed very aggressively and will try to consume as much food as possible as quickly as possible. Care should be taken when keeping this species with smaller fish species as they will consume fish small enough to fit in their mouth, which as an adult of approximately 14 inches can become quite large.
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Red-tailed Tinfoil Barb
2 likes Barbs
(Barbonymus altus) Easy Peaceful 10" 70 gallons 74-82° F, KH 4-10, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore Southeast Asia Cyprinidae Barbs Community The Red-tailed Tinfoil Barb (Barbonymus altus) originates from the larger rivers and surrounding floodplains of the southeast Asian countries of Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia and Laos. They live predominately in the larger rivers where they are found in very large schools; however, they will venture off into floodplains during the rainy season and retreat back to the river as flood waters begin to recede. The body shape and swimming style of the Red-tailed Tinfoil Barb is indicative of the flowing waters of their natural river habitat. This species is often sold under the generic Tinfoil Barb name and often mixed in with the larger Tinfoil barb (Barbonymus schwanenfeldii). Most hobbyists purchase fish as juveniles which makes it difficult to determine the difference between B. altus and B. schwanenfeldii Tinfoil Barbs, as they cannot use the adult size as a means of comparison. The best way to differentiate juvenile forms of Barbonymus schwanenfeldii and Barbonymus altus is to compare the caudal (tail) fin of the fish. Barbonymus schwanenfeldii possesses a distinct black stripe along each lobe of this fin whereas Barbonymus altus does not. Additionally adult specimens of Barbonymus altus tend to exhibit an overall golden/bronze hue to the body when compared with the more silvery Barbonymus schwanenfeldii. Red-tailed Tinfoil Barb live in large schools in nature and generally do not do well when kept singularly or in low numbers in the aquarium. They tend to become more easily frightened and aggressive when not kept in groups. Hobbyists should keep Red-tailed Tinfoil Barb in groups of at least 4 or more individuals in aquariums large enough to support a group of adult fish. While Red-tailed Tinfoil Barbs are not an aggressive species, they are a boisterous species that will swim actively throughout the aquarium. Due to their active nature and aggressive feeding behavior, they may not be suitable for aquariums containing small shy community species. However, they do well with a wide range of tank mates ranging from larger community fish species to semi-aggressive Cichlids and Catfish species. Red-tailed Tinfoil Barbs originate from a river habitat that contains plenty of water flow along with areas of open swimming room and some rocks, plants and tree root. They do best in larger aquariums that have both strong water currents and excellent biological filtration. As with most river species, the Red-tailed Tinfoil Barb is accustomed to a high turnover in water volume which generally means that organic buildup is kept low. They are however quite hardy and can tolerate less than perfect water conditions better than many other river based species. Due to their size and healthy appetite it is recommended that a large canister filter or wet/dry filter be used in order to maintain water quality. An additional powerhead is also recommended in order to create plenty of water flow within the aquarium. The aquarium decor should contain a mixture of open swimming areas and clusters of plants, rocks or tree root in order to give the fish a place to retreat to if they feel threatened. Red-tailed Tinfoil Barbs are easy to feed since they will consume a wide variety of meaty or plant based foods. In the wild they are considered an opportunistic feeder, that will consume smaller fish, algae, small invertebrates, plant matter and even organic detritus. They are just as easily fed in the aquarium environment and will eagerly accept flake, frozen, pellet, freeze-dried or live foods. While the Red-tailed Tinfoil Barb is willing to eat all day long, they should be fed two times per day in most cases in order to control their growth and girth. They should be fed a varied diet containing both plant and animal matter in order to provide balanced nutrition. Red-tailed Tinfoil Barb can cause problems when trying to feed more shy species, as they feed very aggressively and will try to consume as much food as possible as quickly as possible.
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Gold Barb
1 like Barbs
(Puntius sachsi) Easy Peaceful 3" 20 gallons 74-84° F, KH 5-20, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore Southeast Asia Cyprinidae Barbs Community Gold Barbs (Puntius sachsii) have been a popular mainstay within the freshwater aquarium hobby for decades. The combination of their bright gold / orange coloration, ease of care and peaceful disposition make them the perfect addition to any community or planted aquarium. In their native tropical stream habitat in the jungles of southeast Asia, the Gold Barb is found living in large schools of individuals that group together for protection from larger predators. Being that they are accustomed to living in this manner, the Gold Barb should be kept in a group of 4 or more individuals in the aquarium environment. While they can live as a single specimen, they will do much better and live longer when kept with others of their own kind. Gold Barbs make an excellent fish for beginning hobbyists and for hobbyists with smaller aquariums or aquariums containing delicate plants species. Gold Barbs do well in a variety of tropical freshwater aquarium setups and with a wide range of tank mates. It is recommended that they are kept in groups of 4 or more individuals in order to replicate their natural schooling behavior. Tank mates should consist of other peaceful or semi-aggressive community fish species. Gold Barbs prefer aquariums with plants, driftwood and rocks, which will provide them a sense of security. While they do not have specific substrate requirements, they will exhibit bolder colors if kept in an aquarium with a darker substrate and medium to dense vegetation. They are not known for being jumpers and will typically reside in the middle to lower regions of the aquarium. Gold Barbs are one of the more peaceful species of Barb fish and do not exhibit the fin nipping behavior associated with many Barb species. In their natural habitat, Gold Barbs consume both vegetable and meaty foods ranging from plant matter to insects and small worms. Omnivores like the Gold Barb should be fed a varied diet containing both plant and meaty foods in order to provide them all the nutrients that they need to support a healthy immune system and slime coat. Hobbyists should feed the Gold Barb a quality flake food designed for tropical omnivores mixed with algae or plant based flaked foods. In addition to quality flaked foods, Gold Barbs should be offered quality frozen foods, blood worms, tubifex worms, brine shrimp and similar fair to mix up their diet and provide them a wide range of nutritional foodstuffs. They should be fed 2 to 3 times per day an amount of food that will consume within a few minutes.
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Albino Tiger Barb
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(Puntius tetrazona) Easy Semi-aggressive 3" 20 gallons 75-82° F, KH 5-19, pH 6.0-7.8 Omnivore Southeast Asia Cyprinidae Barbs Community Albino Tiger Barbs are an albino variant of the popular Tiger Barb, that throughout years of selective breeding have become very common within the aquarium hobby. With the exception of their albino coloration, the Albino Tiger Barb maintains all the same traits as the common Tiger Barb. In the wild Tiger Barbs are found living in a variety of natural tropical settings including clear shallow waters, turbid flowing streams and shallow murky waters. Due to this variety of settings, the Tiger Barb has developed a wide tolerance to many varied water conditions. They will do well in an aquarium setup with warm tropical waters, with a pH of 6.0-8.0, a water hardness of 5-19 dGH, and either calm water or moderately turbid water currents. Albino Tiger Barbs do not grow too large, attaining a maximum size of about 3 inches in length. With their attractive coloration and pattern, wide tolerance for various aquarium conditions and relatively long life span of 5 to 7 years, the Albino Tiger Barb has become an aquarium hobbyist favorite and can be found in practically all aquarium pet stores. In the aquarium environment the Albino Tiger Barb is an active brightly colored species that will generally be found swimming at lower and mid levels of the aquarium. They have a reputation as being fin nippers; however, this reputation is somewhat unfair as barbs in general exhibit this as part of their natural behavior. It is important to keep Albino Tiger Barbs in groups of 4 or more, so that they can swim as a group and nip at each other instead of other aquarium species. Albino Tiger Barbs will not injure each other with this behavior as it is something barb do amongst themselves and are well equipped for this type of behavior. The nipping only becomes a problem when Albino Tiger Barbs are kept singularly or in too small of numbers (less than four) that they may nip at others in the aquarium who can have their fins injured by this behavior. Albino Tiger Barbs will do best in aquariums that are brightly lit with a good amount of vegetation and some moderate water currents. While they can be kept with all but the most shy of species, they are well suited to coexist well with other boisterous species like loaches, catfish, danios and other species of barbs. Ultimately, the key to successfully owning this barb species is to keep them in good sized groups (6 plus members) and provide them with plenty of mid-level plants and driftwood that they can playfully swim about. Albino Tiger Barbs are true omnivores and will readily accept a variety of flake, crisp, freeze-dried, frozen or live foods. A typical tropical species staple flake will satisfy their complete nutritional needs; however, they can be offered bloodworms, brine or other similar foodstuffs to give them some variety in their diet. Albino Tiger Barbs usually attain sexual maturity at around 1.5 inches in total length, or approximately 2 months of age. The females are larger with a more rounded stomach and a mainly black dorsal fin while the males have a bright, red nose with a distinct red line above the black on their dorsal fin. As egg-layers, they tend to spawn several hundred eggs in a suitable area of plants, with around 300 eggs being the norm for a mature breeding population. The eggs are adhesive and will stay stuck to the plants where they were laid. Albino Tiger Barbs will eat their own eggs, so it is important to remove the parents after spawning to prevent them from eating the eggs. As they are a selectively bred recessive gene variant, they will need to be bred with other Albino Tiger Barbs to continue to increase the likely hood of producing albino offspring.
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Green Tiger Barb
1 like Barbs
(Puntius tetrazona) Easy Semi-aggressive 3" 20 gallons 75-82° F, KH 5-19, pH 6.0-7.8 Omnivore Southeast Asia Cyprinidae Barbs Community Green Tiger Barbs are a selectively bred variant of the Tiger Barb, that through years of selective breeding have brought out the naturally occurring green coloration and accentuated it. The body of the Green Tiger Barb has medium to large areas of green coloration that varies from a medium to dark green in color. In the wild Tiger Barbs are found living in a variety of natural tropical settings including clear shallow waters, turbid flowing streams and shallow murky waters. Due to this variety of settings, the Tiger Barb has developed a wide tolerance to many varied water conditions. They will do well in an aquarium setup with warm tropical waters, with a pH of 6.0-8.0, a water hardness of 5-19 dGH, and either calm water or moderately turbid water currents. Green Tiger Barbs do not grow too large, attaining a maximum size of about 3 inches in length. With their attractive coloration and pattern, wide tolerance for various aquarium conditions and relatively long life span of 5 to 7 years, the Green Tiger Barb has become an aquarium hobbyist favorite and can be found in practically all aquarium pet stores. In the aquarium environment the Green Tiger Barb is an active brightly colored species that will generally be found swimming at lower and mid levels of the aquarium. They have a reputation as being fin nippers; however, this reputation is somewhat unfair as barbs in general exhibit this as part of their natural behavior. It is important to keep Green Tiger Barbs in groups of 4 or more, so that they can swim as a group and nip at each other instead of other aquarium species. Green Tiger Barbs will not injure each other with this behavior as it is something barb do among themselves and are well equipped for this type of behavior. The nipping only becomes a problem when Green Tiger Barbs are kept singularly or in too small of numbers (less than four) that they may nip at others in the aquarium who can have their fins injured by this behavior. Green Tiger Barbs will do best in aquariums that are brightly lit with a good amount of vegetation and some moderate water currents. While they can be kept with all but the most shy of species, they are well suited to coexist well with other boisterous species like loaches, catfish, danios and other species of barbs. Ultimately, the key to successfully owning this barb species is to keep them in good sized groups (6 plus members) and provide them with plenty of mid-level plants and driftwood that they can playfully swim about. Green Tiger Barbs are true omnivores and will readily accept a variety of flake, crisp, freeze-dried, frozen or live foods. A typical tropical species staple flake will satisfy their complete nutritional needs; however, they can be offered bloodworms, brine or other similar foodstuffs to give them some variety in their diet. Green Tiger Barbs usually attain sexual maturity at around 1.5 inches in total length, or approximately 2 months of age. The females are larger with a more rounded stomach and a mainly black dorsal fin while the males have a bright, red nose with a distinct red line above the black on their dorsal fin. As egg-layers, they tend to spawn several hundred eggs in a suitable area of plants, with around 300 eggs being the norm for a mature breeding population. The eggs are adhesive and will stay stuck to the plants where they were laid. Green Tiger Barbs will eat their own eggs, so it is important to remove the parents after spawning to prevent them from eating the eggs. As they are a selectively bred variant, they will need to be bred with other Green Tiger Barbs to continue to exhibit strong green coloration on their bodies.
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Denison Barb
2 likes Barbs
(Barbus denisonii) Easy Peaceful 5" 55 gallons 62-78° F, KH 4-10, pH 6.8-7.8 Omnivore India Cyprinidae Barbs Community Denison Barb's originate from India where they can be found living in fast flowing streams, rivers and tributaries of the southern part of the country. They are a shoaling species that groups in large numbers for protection from larger predatory species. They are also fast swimmers that use rapid acceleration and jumping from the water to avoid attacks from larger predatory fish species. Denison Barb's are commonly sold within the aquarium hobby by a variety of common names including: Denison Barb, Rose Line Shark and the Red Lined Torpedo Barb. As with most fish species that originate from fast flowing rivers and streams the Denison Barb is designed to swim very rapidly, thus they need larger (longer) aquariums than other fish species their size. They also require the aquarium to be fully covered as they have a natural instinct to jump from the water as an escape mechanism when they feel threatened. Denison Barb's require larger aquariums than most tropical community species their size, as they are very active swimmers and need plenty of room to dart about the aquarium. As they originate from fast flowing streams and rivers, they are used to high levels of dissolved oxygen in the water and very high quality water conditions. It is important to provide them with plenty of water flow and oxygen through the use of additional power heads or pumps that agitate the water's surface, which will increase the levels of oxygen in the water. While it is possible to keep a single specimen or a pair of Denison Barb's, it is better to keep a group ( 4 or more) as this will help replicate how they live in the wild. They do very well with other similar sized tropical community species and can be kept with a wide variety of peaceful and semi-aggressive tropical community fish species. In addition to sufficient water flow, the Denison Barb will also appreciate an aquarium with plenty of plants that it can swim among and retreat to when threatened. Lastly, aquariums housing Denison Barb's should be fully covered as they are well known for jumping out of un-covered aquariums. In the wild the Denison Barb will consume a mix of plant and animal based foods. In order to provide them with a balanced nutritional diet, the aquarium hobbyist should make sure that they have a mixture of plant, algae and meaty foods in their diet. They are not picky eaters and will readily consume a large variety of commercially available foods including: high quality flake and pellet foods, frozen foods, freeze-dried worms, bloodworms, tubifex worms, brine shrimp and other similar foodstuffs.