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Electric Blue Acara
(Aequidens Pulcher) Easy Semi-aggressive 4" 30 gallons 74-84° F, pH 5.5-7.0, KH 1-5 Omnivore Farm Raised - Asia Cichlidae Aequidens Cichlid-New-World Electric Blue Acara are a product of forced hybridization, which is the process of combing the eggs from a female fish with the sperm of a genetically similar donor male species. Which in the case of Blue Acara is easy to do as they lay eggs that are externally fertilized. In the case of Electric Blue Acara, Asian fish farms were able to fertilize Blue Acara eggs with the sperm from the genetically similar Electric Blue Ram. The resulting fertilized eggs are then hatched and raised in a lab, where the resulting offspring are then line bred in order to stabilize the recessive trait. Like the Electric Blue Ram, the Electric Blue Acara will breed true with all of the fry exhibiting electric blue coloration. If cross bread with a typical Blue Acara, you will end up with 100% normal Blue Acara who carries a recessive electric gene. This is good for the long term health of the species, as wild Blue Acara can be bred back into the gene pool while still maintaining plenty of electric blue offspring. Adult Electric Blue Acara will do well in aquariums that are at least 30 gallons, which should ideally have either a fine sandy substrate or small size gravel substrate, contain multiple places where they can find shelter like driftwood, rock structures, or dense vegetation and areas of both diffused and bright lighting. Electric Blue Acara will appreciate planted aquariums that simulate their native environment, but have been known to dig some while breeding which can cause some uprooting in plants that are not well established. Electric Blue Acara have become quite popular within a short time due not only to their brilliant coloration, but due to their good temperament and ability to fit in well in a variety of aquarium environments. They can peacefully coexist with all but the smallest most shy fish or largest most aggressive fish, which makes them an excellent addition to most hobbyists aquariums. It should be noted that they will become more aggressive during breeding, thus mated pairs will not be suitable for community aquariums with smaller tank mates. Electric Blue Acara may bully or even eat very small fish like Neon Tetra, but can be kept with most all types of community fish larger than 2 inches (5 cm) in length. Overall they are a hardy, colorful, moderately sized, long lived and full of personality community Cichlid species. The Electric Blue Acara is an omnivore and should be fed a variety of foods, such as frozen or freeze-dried brine shrimp, bloodworms, blackworms, flake food, and Cichlid pellets. They also relish live food and should occasionally be provided with live white worms, brine shrimp, or other similar items. Best to feed 2 to 3 times a day an amount of food that they will consume within a few minutes. Electric Blue Acara are dimorphic, egg layers who practice brood care and renown for being excellent parents to their young fry. To induce breeding and sustain the ideal breeding environment, the water temperature should be raised to and maintained at about 86° F. The female Electric Blue Acara will lay from 150-250 eggs in a carefully cleaned and selected location, which generally consists of a hard surface like a smooth rock, slate, shell or clay pot. The eggs will hatch within 2-3 days and the fry should be swimming around within a week. A pair of Electric Blue Acara will continue to breed every few weeks if the fry are constantly removed shortly after they hatch. The newly hatched fry can be fed a diet of baby brine shrimp, crushed flake, crushed pellet or similar fare and then moved to other foods as they mature.
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Saddle Cichlid
(Aequidens tetramerus) Moderate Semi-aggressive 8" 55 gallons 75-82° F, KH 1-20, pH 4.5-7.5 Omnivore Northern South America, Northern Amazon Cichlidae Aequidens Cichlid-New-World The Saddle Cichlid (Aequidens tetramerus) originates from the rivers, tributaries and flood plains of the northern South America and northern portions of the Amazon. They are widely distributed throughout Colombia, Peru, Venezuela, Ecuador, Brazil and other nearby countries. The Saddle Cichlid is considered a generalist or opportunistic fish species, as they are able to live and thrive in a variety of habitats. The preferred habitat of the Saddle Cichlid are slow moving rivers and flood plains, that offer gentle water currents and plenty of underwater structure in the form of submerged tree roots, aquatic plants and leaf litter. Saddle Cichlids are most often found inhabiting slow moving river tributaries and drainages where they are protected from larger predatory fish species and have an abundant supply of insects and small invertebrates on which to feed. Saddle Cichlids are well established within the aquarium hobby and are commonly offered for sale under a few common names including: Saddle Cichlid, Two-Spot Acara and Tetramerus Cichlid. Saddle Cichlids do best in an Amazon biotope or similar aquarium setup containing similarly sized semi-aggressive fish species. They are best suited for aquarium hobbyists with moderate experience in raising Cichlids and who have a mature aquarium with strong filtration. As with most river based fish species, the Saddle Cichlid is used to good water conditions that the large volume of water flow within the river environment provides. They do best in established Amazon biotope aquariums that have a well established nitrogen cycle, strong biological and chemical filtration. Mechanical filtration is important in all Cichlid aquarium setups, as they tend to be messy eaters that can create a fair amount of left over food that needs to be consumed by scavenging fish species or exported from the aquarium via mechanical filtration before it breaks down and fowls the water. The Saddle Cichlid will do best in aquariums with a sandy substrate or mixed sand and gravel substrate, plenty of tree root, hardy live plants/fake plants and some rock caves or rock piles. Water flow should be low to moderate and the aquarium lighting should be low to moderate, or diffused by plants if strong aquarium lighting is being used. Tank mates for the Saddle Cichlid should consist of other semi-aggressive Cichlid species, medium sized catfish and scavenging species like plecos and loaches. While the Saddle Cichlid is not overly aggressive towards other similarly sized tank mates, they are territorial towards others of their own kind. Multiple specimens can be kept in the same aquarium as a mated pair or if the aquarium is large enough to support multiple territories. The Saddle Cichlid should be fed a varied diet consisting of both plant based and meaty foods in order to provide them with all the vitamins and minerals they need to maintain a healthy immune system and slime coat. Hobbyists should provide a mix of quality Cichlid pellet foods mixed with freeze-dried or frozen preparations like bloodworms or other similar foods. Saddle Cichlids will also feed on blanched vegetables and planted based wafer or freeze-dried foodstuffs. They should be fed once or twice per day an amount of food that they will consume within a few minutes.
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Yellow Acara
(Aequidens metae) Easy Semi-Aggressive 6" 45 gallons 74-84° F, pH 5.5-7.0, KH 1-5 Omnivore South America Cichlidae Aequidens Cichlid-New-World Aequidens metae, also known as the Yellow Acara, is a very attractive species that originates within still to slow moving waters in South America. They have a tannish base color with a black, lateral spot; the spot is separated by two pale-gold to orange, vertical bands. The most beautiful and distinctive feature of the Yellow Acara is the electric, gold to blue-green iridescent markings over their operculums (gill covers). They have metallic, gold-green hued scales on their flanks that become translucent at their fins. A male will have more elongated dorsal and anal fins than the female. The male will also be larger than the female, but the female will grow thicker. Yellow Acara require an aquarium of at least 45 gallons and should be provided with multiple places where they can find shelter (driftwood, rock structures, or dense vegetation). Although they are generally considered to be a peaceful species and have been successfully kept in Community aquariums, the Yellow Acara is can show aggression; even more so during breeding. Yellow Acara will bully small fish and eat the tiny ones, therefore, tank mates should be considered carefully and should be comparable in size. The Yellow Acara is an omnivore and should be fed a variety of foods, such as frozen or freeze-dried brine shrimp, bloodworms, blackworms, flake food, and Cichlid pellets. Yellow Acara also relish live food and should occasionally be provided with live brine shrimp, guppies, minnows, shrimp, worms, and crickets. Yellow Acara are substrate, egg layers that practice brood care. Yellow Acara are difficult to breed, but to help induce breeding and sustain the ideal breeding environment, the water level should be lowered and then replaced while the temperature is raised to and maintained at about 86° F. The female Yellow Acara will lay from 150-250 eggs in a carefully cleaned and selected location (smooth stones, slate, flat rock, etc). The eggs will hatch in 2-3 days and the fry should be swimming around within a week. The newly hatched fry can be fed a diet of baby brine shrimp and then moved to other foods as they mature.
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Green Terror
(Aequidens rivulatus) Easy Aggressive 10" 50 Gallons 74-84° F, pH 5.5-7.5, KH 2-8 Omnivore Amazon Basin, South America Cichlidae Aequidens New World Cichlid Aquarium The Green Terror is a hardy species that is native to still and slow moving waters in South America. Known for their beautiful colors and bad attitudes, they will add a lot of color and personality to any aquarium. Green Terrors are often confused with their less aggressive relative, the Blue Acara (Aequidens pulcher). They have a tan base color with vertical, dark striping on the body and distinctive, iridescent, electric blue-green markings over their operculums (gill covers) as well as iridescent, blue-green scales on their flanks that become translucent at their fins. They also have (to varying intensity) a black ocellus spot on and below their upper lateral line and their caudal and dorsal fins of end with thick, orange outlines. Green Terror males will also develop a nuchal hump on their heads and will grow out to be much larger than the females. Females tend to have a washed-out coloration, while males display vivid colors. Green Terrors require an aquarium of at least 55 gallons and should be provided with multiple places where they can find shelter (driftwood, rock structures, or dense vegetation). Green Terrors appreciate soft, acidic, and clean water as well as live plants, but have been known to dig, which will cause some uprooting issues. They do exhibit a fair amount of aggression towards others of their own kind and will bully weaker, smaller fish especially if they are similar in shape. Green Terrors are generally territorial, which means that tank mates should be considered carefully and should be comparable in size. Being an omnivore, the Green Terrors should be fed a variety of foods, such as live, frozen or freeze-dried ghost shrimp, minnows, shrimp, crickets, bloodworms, blackworms, earthworms, flake food, and Cichlid pellets. Green Terrors are egg layers that practice brood care. For the ideal breeding environment, the water temperature should be raised to and maintained at about 86° F. The female Green Terrors will lay 300-400 eggs in a carefully cleaned location (driftwood, rocks, stones, slate, large plant leaves, etc). The eggs will hatch in 2-3 days and the fry should be swimming around within a week. The newly hatched fry should be fed a diet of baby brine shrimp or crushed flake food and then moved to other foods as they mature.
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Blue Acara
(Aequidens pulcher) Easy Semi-Aggressive 7" 45 gallons 74-84° F, pH 5.5-7.0, KH 1-5 Omnivore Central and South America Cichlidae Aequidens Cichlid-New-World Aequidens pulcher, also known as the Blue Acara, is a very attractive and hardy species that originates within still to slow moving waters in Central and South America. Blue Acara are often confused with their more aggressive relative, the Green Terror (Aequidens rivulatus). They have a tannish base color with vertical, dark striping on the body. The most beautiful and distinctive feature of the Blue Acara is the electric, blue-green, iridescent markings over their operculums (gill covers). They have metallic, gold-green hued scales on their flanks that become translucent at their fins. Their caudal and dorsal fins end with an orange outline. A male Blue Acara will have more elongated dorsal and anal fins than a female. Blue Acara require an aquarium of at least 45 gallons and should be provided with a fine substrate and multiple places where they can find shelter (driftwood, rock structures, or dense vegetation). While they appreciate the pressence of live plants in the aquarium, they have been known to dig while breeding and can cause some uprooting. Although they are generally considered to be a peaceful species and have been successfully kept in Community aquariums, the Blue Acara can show aggression; even more so during breeding. Blue Acaras will bully small fish and eat the tiny ones, therefore, tank mates should be considered carefully and should be comparable in size. The Blue Acara is an omnivore and should be fed a variety of foods, such as frozen or freeze-dried brine shrimp, bloodworms, blackworms, flake food, and Cichlid pellets. They relish live food and should occasionally be provided with live brine shrimp, guppies, minnows, shrimp, worms, and crickets. Blue Acara are dimorphic, egg layers that practice brood care. To induce breeding and sustain the ideal breeding environment, the water temperature should be raised to and maintained at about 86° F. The female Blue Acara will lay from 150-250 eggs in a carefully cleaned and selected location (driftwood, rocks, stones, slate, large plant leaves, etc). The eggs will hatch in 2-3 days and the fry should be swimming around within a week. A pair of Blue Acara will continue to breed every two weeks if the fry are constantly removed shortly after they hatch. The newly hatched fry can be fed a diet of baby brine shrimp and then moved to other foods as they mature.
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