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Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish
3 likes Anglefish
(Pterophyllum sp.) Easy Semi-aggressive 6" 30 gallons 75-82° F, KH 1-5, pH 5.8-7.0 Omnivore Captive bred Cichlidae Angelfish Community The Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) is the result of selective breeding that over the course of decades has produced the brilliantly colored and patterned specimens now found within the aquarium hobby. Todays Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish are the culmination of many years worth of selective line breeding, which has combined attributes of fish carrying the "Philippine blue pb gene" with multiple more established lines of Angelfish including: Zebra Angelfish, Platinum Angelfish, Albino Angelfish and many others. In addition to the traits common to a Marbled Angelfish, the Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish is selectively bred with Angelfish exhibiting the blue color gene in or to combine the both the blue coloration and the marbled pattern of a Marbled Angelfish. While generally available for sale within the aquarium hobby, the Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish is one of the more rare variants to find in the average local fish store. Thus, many hobbyists acquire Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish online from specialty retailers or from breeders at aquarium shows or conferences. Like all Angelfish, the Blue Platinum Marble prefers warm temperate waters similar to that of their native Amazon basin in South America, where they are found in calm waterways and flood plains. In nature, Angels are found living in areas with plenty of dense vegetation and tree roots, which they use for protection against larger fish species and as a place to hunt insect larvae and other foodstuffs. Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish will do well in aquariums that are at least 30 gallons or larger and have plenty of plants and/or driftwood. As a group freshwater Angelfish are territorial and will squabble with one another until a dominant male is established. They can be kept singularly, in mated pairs or in medium sized groups of 6 or more. When kept in groups they will need an aquarium considerably larger than a 30 gallon aquarium that would be appropriate for a single specimen or pair, smaller groups will do well in a 75 gallon and larger groups (more than 6) will need a 125 gallon or larger tank. Contrary to popular belief, long finned species like the Angelfish can be kept with barbs and other "fin nipping" species. The key here is that the fin nipping species be kept in proper sized groups, so that they nip at each other instead of nipping at the Angelfish or other species that are not equipped for this type of behavior. Angelfish in general require fairly constant water parameters and are less forgiving than many other freshwater community species towards fluctuations in pH or temperature. Like with most South American cichlid species, the Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish prefers soft, slightly acidic water with temperatures that stay between 79 and 83 degrees. However, the farm bred specimens that are generally sold in aquarium stores are more tolerant of a wider range of water parameters than their wild caught cousins. Angelfish are omnivores and should be fed a variety of foods including meaty and vegetable based foods. They have a particular love for blood worms, black worms, tubifex worms and similar food items, but will readily consume flake, pellet and frozen foods. They should be fed about twice per day the amount of food that they will consume within 5 minutes. When housed in aquariums with many faster swimming fish species, it may be necessary to increase feedings to 3 times per day to make sure that the Angel is properly fed. This is rarely an issue with adult angelfish as they will generally feed very aggressively and are rarely intimidated by other community fish species. Full grown Angelfish will prey on small fish species like small Neon Tetras, Mosquito Danios or pretty much any small species that will fit into their mouth. They generally wait until the aquarium lights are off for the night and hunt the small fish while they sleep, which makes them easy prey. Because they grow to be a fairly large fish, adult Blue Zebra Angels are capable of eating small fish up to 1 inch in length. Angelfish form monogamous pairs. They lay eggs on smooth vertical surfaces like a piece of wood, a flat leaf, smooth rocks, slate, or even the aquarium glass. Breeders often provide an artificial spawning site such as a piece of slate, a ceramic cone, or a vertical piece of plastic pipe in order to more easily facilitate removing the eggs from the breeding tank if needed. Howerver, as with most cichlids, Angelfish perform brood care where the parents will tend to the eggs, and when they hatch the parents will hang the fry on vertical surfaces until they become free-swimming. Sexing angelfish is difficult even for experienced angelfish breeders can usually discriminate male from female visually, it is not foolproof. Only during spawning will you be able to tell the male from the female because the female has a thick, blunt breeding tube, and the male has a thin, more pointed breeding tube. Breeding specialized variants like the Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish requires a deeper look into the genetics of fish breeding and is beyond the scope of this profile.
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Ashley Gilbert
Sara Bruce
Blue Zebra Angelfish
(Pterophyllum scalare) Easy Semi-aggressive 6" 30 gallons 75-82° F, KH 1-5, pH 5.8-7.0 Omnivore Captive bred Cichlidae Angelfish Community The Blue Zebra Angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) is the result of selective breeding that over the course of decades has produced the brilliantly colored and patterned specimens now found within the aquarium hobby. In addition to the traits common to a Zebra Angelfish, having four to six vertical stripes, the Blue Zebra Angelfish is selectively bred with Angelfish exhibiting the blue color gene in or to combine the both the blue coloration and the wide striped pattern of the Zebra. While generally available for sale within the aquarium hobby, the Blue Zebra Angel is one of the more rare variants to find in the average local fish store. Thus, many hobbyists acquire Blue Zebra Angelfish online from specialty retailers or from breeders at aquarium shows or conferences. Like all Angelfish, the Blue Zebra prefers warm temperate waters similar to that of their native Amazon basin in South America, where they are found in calm waterways and flood plains. In nature, Angels are found living in areas with plenty of dense vegetation and tree roots, which they use for protection against larger fish species and as a place to hunt insect larvae and other foodstuffs. Blue Zebra Angelfish will do well in aquariums that are at least 30 gallons or larger and have plenty of plants and/or driftwood. As a group freshwater Angelfish are territorial and will squabble with one another until a dominant male is established. They can be kept singularly, in mated pairs or in medium sized groups of 6 or more. When kept in groups they will need an aquarium considerably larger than a 30 gallon aquarium that would be appropriate for a single specimen or pair, smaller groups will do well in a 75 gallon and larger groups (more than 6) will need a 125 gallon or larger tank. Contrary to popular belief, long finned species like the Angelfish can be kept with barbs and other "fin nipping" species. The key here is that the fin nipping species be kept in proper sized groups, so that they nip at each other instead of nipping at the Angelfish or other species that are not equipped for this type of behavior. Angelfish in general require fairly constant water parameters and are less forgiving than many other freshwater community species towards fluctuations in pH or temperature. Like with most South American cichlid species, the Blue Zebra Angelfish prefers soft, slightly acidic water with temperatures that stay between 79 and 83 degrees. However, the farm bred specimens that are generally sold in aquarium stores are more tolerant of a wider range of water parameters than their wild caught cousins. Angelfish are omnivores and should be fed a variety of foods including meaty and vegetable based foods. They have a particular love for blood worms, black worms, tubifex worms and similar food items, but will readily consume flake, pellet and frozen foods. They should be fed about twice per day the amount of food that they will consume within 5 minutes. When housed in aquariums with many faster swimming fish species, it may be necessary to increase feedings to 3 times per day to make sure that the Angel is properly fed. This is rarely an issue with adult angelfish as they will generally feed very aggressively and are rarely intimidated by other community fish species. Full grown Angelfish will prey on small fish species like small Neon Tetras, Mosquito Danios or pretty much any small species that will fit into their mouth. They generally wait until the aquarium lights are off for the night and hunt the small fish while they sleep, which makes them easy prey. Because they grow to be a fairly large fish, adult Blue Zebra Angels are capable of eating small fish up to 1 inch in length. Angelfish form monogamous pairs. They lay eggs on smooth vertical surfaces like a piece of wood, a flat leaf, smooth rocks, slate, or even the aquarium glass. Breeders often provide an artificial spawning site such as a piece of slate, a ceramic cone, or a vertical piece of plastic pipe in order to more easily facilitate removing the eggs from the breeding tank if needed. Howerver, as with most cichlids, Angelfish perform brood care where the parents will tend to the eggs, and when they hatch the parents will hang the fry on vertical surfaces until they become free-swimming. Sexing angelfish is difficult even for experienced angelfish breeders can usually discriminate male from female visually, it is not foolproof. Only during spawning will you be able to tell the male from the female because the female has a thick, blunt breeding tube, and the male has a thin, more pointed breeding tube. Breeding specialized variants like the Blue Zebra Angelfish requires a deeper look into the genetics of fish breeding and is beyond the scope of this profile.
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Half-Black Angelfish
(Pterophyllum scalare) Easy Semi-aggressive 6" 30 gallons 75-82° F, KH 1-5, pH 5.8-7.0 Omnivore Captive bred Cichlidae Angelfish Community The Half-Black Angelfish (Pterophyllum sp.) is the result of selective breeding that over the course of decades has produced the brilliantly patterned specimens now found within the aquarium hobby. It is believed that breeders from Asia were able to breed wild type silver angelfish with a specific single recessive gene, that when properly environmentally influenced would produce Half-Black Angelfish. While generally available for sale within the aquarium hobby, the Half-Black Angel is considerably more rare than most selectively bred freshwater angelfish due to the extra effort and difficulty in raising this species. Thus, their brilliant appearance and rarity has made this variant one of the more sought after freshwater angelfish variants currently available within the freshwater aquarium fish trade. Like all Angelfish, the Half-Black prefers warm temperate waters similar to that of their native Amazon basin in South America, where they are found in calm waterways and flood plains. In nature, Angels are found living in areas with losts of dense vegetation and tree roots, which they use for protection against larger fish species and as a place to hunt insect larvae and other foodstuffs. Half-Black Angelfish will do well in aquariums that are at least 30 gallons or larger and have plenty of plants and/or driftwood. As a group freshwater Angelfish are territorial and will squabble with one another until a dominant male is established. They can be kept singularly, in mated pairs or in medium sized groups of 6 or more. Contrary to popular belief, long finned species like the Angelfish can be kept with barbs and other "fin nipping" species. The key here is that the fin nipping species be kept in proper sized groups, so that they nip at each other instead of nipping at the Angelfish or other species that are not equipped for this type of behavior. Angelfish in general require fairly constant water parameters and are less forgiving than many other freshwater community species towards fluctuations in pH or temperature. Like with most South American cichlid species, the Half-Black Angelfish prefers soft, slightly acidic water with temperatures that stay between 79 and 83 degrees. However, the farm bred specimens that are generally sold in aquarium stores are more tolerant of a wider range of water parameters than their wild caught cousins. Angelfish are omnivores and should be fed a variety of foods including meaty and vegetable based foods. They have a particular love for blood worms, tubifex worms and similar food items, but will readily consume flake, pellet and frozen foods. They should be fed about twice per day the amount of food that they will consume within 5 minutes. When housed in aquariums with many faster swimming fish species, it may be necessary to increase feedings to 3 times per day to make sure that the Angel is properly fed. This is rarely an issue with adult angelfish as they will generally feed very aggressively and are rarely intimidated by other community fish species. Full grown Angelfish will prey on small fish species like small Neon Tetras, Mosquito Danios or pretty much any small species that will fit into their mouth. They generally wait until the aquarium lights are off for the night and hunt the small fish while they sleep, which makes them easy prey. Because they grow to be a fairly large fish, adult Half-Black Angels are capable of eating small fish up to 1 inch in length. The basics in breeding Half-Black Angelfish is that the pattern is inherited, most likely as a single recessive gene, and that they are environmentally influenced. A key factor in producing Half-Black Angelfish that while the parents need to be genetically Half-Blacks, the fry must be raised with specific environmental parameters in order to produce primarily Half-Black offspring. If they fry are raised incorrectly, the half-black pattern will generally be inhibited and the fry will only develop a basic silver coloration. To raise Half-Black Angelfish, first obtain a mated pair with the full half-black pattern, not ones having only a partial half-black pattern. Then after a successful breeding the real work in producing half-black angelfish begins. It is recommended to raise about 100 to 130 fry per 30 to 40 gallon tank, maintain warm consistent water temperature of 80° F to 82° F, feed newly hatched brine shrimp twice per day and make large frequent water changes in order to maintain pristine water conditions. Be sure to pay special attention to matching the water temperature during water changes to avoid any sudden fluctuation. Continue with this regimen until the fry are about 4 weeks old, then reduce water changes to about twice a week and introduce other quality foods like frozen brine shrimp, blackworms or high quality commercial dry foods. Stimulating quick growth through warm water, frequent feedings and excellent water quality has shown to be the most reliable way of getting a pair of Half-Black Angelfish to produce half-black babies.
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Platinum Angelfish
3 likes Anglefish
(Pterophyllum sp.) Easy Semi-aggressive 6" 30 gallons 75-82° F, KH 1-5, pH 5.8-7.0 Omnivore Amazon, South America Cichlidae Angelfish Community Platinum Angelfish (Pterophyllum sp.) were originally derived from wild Golden Angelfish both containing a particular recessive gene. Since the result of this was an extremely beautiful platinum Angelfish, breeders were quick to identify the suitable parent fish to begin to mass produce Platinum Angelfish for the aquarium trade. Platinum Angelfish exhibit a brilliant silver/white sheen with just the slightest hint of blue or green on their fins. Specimens available within the aquarium hobby trade will almost always be farm raised and selectively bred for the aquarium hobby. Wild Platinum Angelfish hail from the warm temperate waters of the Amazon basin in South America, where they are found in calm waterways and flood plains. Platinum Angels are found living in areas with losts of plants or tree roots, which they use for protection against larger fish species and as a place to hunt insect larvae and other foodstuffs. These days this species is more commonly tank bred in the United States and parts of Southern Asia, than collected from the wild. They have long been sought after in the aquarium hobby because of their brilliant coloration and long flowing fins. Their long fins mean that they should not be kept with fish species that will nip or tear their fins. In a small or medium sized aquarium the Platinum Angel is best kept in a mated pair, in larger aquariums they can be kept in groups of 6 or more individuals. Platinum Angelfish will do well in aquariums that are 30 gallons or larger and have plenty of plants and/or driftwood. As a group freshwater Angelfish are territorial and will squabble with one another until a dominant male is established. They can be kept singularly, in mated pairs or in medium sized groups of 6 or more. Contrary to popular belief, long finned species like the Platinum Angelfish can be kept with barbs and other "fin nipping" species. The key here is that the fin nipping species be kept in proper sized groups, so that they nip at each other instead of nipping at the Angelfish or other species that are not equipped for this type of behavior. Barbs and other fin nippers prefer to be kept in groups and their nipping at each other is normal behavior that will not hurt them at all; however, this behavior is too boisterous for many other fish species and damaging to long finned fish species. Angelfish in general require fairly constant water parameters and are less forgiving than many other freshwater community species towards fluctuations in pH or temperature. Like with most South American cichlid species, the Platinum Angelfish prefers soft, slightly acidic water with temperatures that stay between 79 and 83 degrees. Platinum Angelfish are omnivores and should be fed a variety of foods including meaty and vegetable based foods. They have a particular love for blood worms, tubifex worms and similar food items, but will readily consume flake, pellet and frozen foods. They should be fed about twice per day the amount of food that they will consume within 5 minutes. When housed in aquariums with many faster swimming fish species, it may be necessary to increase feedings to 3 times per day to make sure that the Angel is properly fed. Full grown Platinum Angels will prey on small fish species like small Neon Tetras, Mosquito Danios or pretty much any small species that will fit into their mouth. They generally wait until the aquarium lights are off for the night and hunt the small fish while they sleep, which makes them easy prey. Because they grow to be a fairly large fish, adult Platinum Angels are capable of eating small fish up to 1 inch in length.
Koi Angel
(Pterophyllum scalare) Moderate Semi-aggressive 6" 20 gallons 75-82° F, KH 1-5, pH 6.0-7.0 Omnivore Amazon, Peru, Eastern Ecuador Cichlidae Angelfish Community Koi Angel's have been bred to accentuate their blotched or mottled black, white, yellow and orange coloration. It is this mottled coloration that gives them their common name as their color blotches are similar to the selectively bred ornamental carp called Koi. Their random patterns and coloration make each on of these fish unique, as each specimen will have a different pattern and coloration. Koi Angel's are long lived compared to many tropical community fish species, with some specimens living more than 10 years in a well maintained aquarium environment. Koi Angel's do well in the community aquarium, but will eat very small fish species like young tetras or guppies. Koi Angel's should be kept in mature tropical aquariums with soft, slightly acidic water conditions and stable water temperatures that stay above 75°F. While not required, Koi Angel's will do much better in aquariums that are well planted with live plants as this will most closely replicate their natural environment. They should also be kept in an aquarium with moderate water flow as in the wild they tend to stay out of strong currents and will congregate among the heavily planted shores or near underwater root structures. The Koi Angel should be housed as a single specimen, mated pair or group of 6 or more, so that a single dominant fish will not pick on the other smaller and weaker Angels. Lastly, care should be taken when housing the Koi Angel with known fin nippers as their long fins will make them a target for harassment. If kept with fin nipping species like barbs, make sure that the barbs are kept in a large enough group so that they will nip among themselves and leave the Angel alone. Plenty of plants within the aquarium will also give the Koi Angel places to seek refuge if it is being harassed by another fish. Koi Angelfish are omnivores and will eat a wide variety of live and prepared foods that are commonly fed to freshwater tropical fish species. They have a particular love for blood worms and tubifex worms, but will readily consume flake, pellet and frozen foods. They should be fed about twice per day the amount of food that they will consume within 5 minutes. When housed in aquariums with many faster swimming fish species, it may be necessary to increase feedings to 3 times per day to make sure that the Angel is properly fed.
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Gold Veil Angel
(Pterophyllum sp.) Moderate Semi-aggressive 6" 30 gallons 72-86° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.0-7.5 Omnivore South America Cichlidae Angelfish Community The Gold Veil Angel hails from the warm temperate waters of the Amazon basin in South America, where it is found in calm waterways and flood plains. Gold Veil Angels are found living in areas with losts of plants or tree roots, which they use for protection against larger fish species and as a place to hunt insect larvae and other foodstuffs. These days this species is more commonly tank bred in the United States and parts of Southern Asia, than collected from the wild. They have long been sought after in the aquarium hobby because of their brilliant gold body coloration and long flowing fins. Their coloration is magnified when they are kept in heavily planted aquariums, as there gold color creates a stark contrast to the darker green of the plants leaves and stalks. Their long fins mean that they should not be kept with fish species that will nip or tear their fins. Many "fin nipping" species can be kept easily with angelfish as long as the "fin nippers" are kept in groups of 4 or more, so that they will nip at each other and ignore the angelfish. In a small or medium sized aquarium the Gold Veil Angel is best kept in a mated pair, in larger aquariums they can be kept in groups of 6 or more individuals. Gold Veil Angelfish will do well in aquariums that are 30 gallons or larger and have plenty of plants and/or driftwood. As a group freshwater Angelfish are territorial and will squabble with one another until a dominant male is established. They can be kept singularly, in mated pairs or in medium sized groups of 6 or more. Contrary to popular belief, long finned species like the Gold Veil Angelfish can be kept with barbs and other "fin nipping" species. The key here is that the barbs be kept in proper sized groups, so that they nip at each other instead of nipping at the Angelfish or other species that are not equipped for this type of behavior. Barbs prefer to be kept in groups and their nipping at each other is normal behavior that will not hurt them at all; however, this behavior is too boisterous for many other fish species and damaging to long finned fish species. Angelfish in general require fairly constant water parameters and are less forgiving than many other freshwater community species towards fluctuations in pH or temperature. Like with most South American cichlid species, the Gold Veil Angelfish prefers soft, slightly acidic water with temperatures that stay between 79 and 83 degrees. The Gold Veil Angelfish is an omnivore and should be fed a variety of foods including vegetables as well as meaty foods. Feed a quality flake food as well as live and frozen foods such as brine shrimp, bloodworms and tubfex worms. They are particularly fond of bloodworms and it is even believed that feeding Angelfish bloodworms will help stimulate breeding behavior.
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Black Veil Angel
2 likes Anglefish
(Pterophyllum sp.) Moderate Semi-Aggressive 6" 30 gallons 75-82° F, KH 1-5, pH 5.8-7.0 Omnivore South America Cichlidae Angelfish Community The Black Veil Angel hails from the warm temperate waters of the Amazon basin in South America, where it is found in calm waterways and flood plains. Black Veil Angels are found living in areas with dense plants and tree roots, which they use for protection against larger fish species and as a place to hunt insect larvae and other foodstuffs. These days this species is more commonly tank bred in the United States and parts of Southern Asia, than collected from the wild. They have long been sought after in the aquarium hobby because of their brilliant black body coloration and long flowing fins. Their long fins mean that they should not be kept with fish species that will nip or tear their fins. Many "fin nipping" species can be kept easily with angelfish as long as the "fin nippers" are kept in groups of 4 or more, so that they will nip at each other and ignore the angelfish. In a small or medium sized aquarium the Black Veil Angel is best kept in a mated pair, in larger aquariums they can be kept in groups of 6 or more individuals. Black Veil Angelfish will do well in aquariums that are 30 gallons or larger and have plenty of plants and/or driftwood. As a group freshwater Angelfish are territorial and will squabble with one another until a dominant male is established. They can be kept singularly, in mated pairs or in medium sized groups of 6 or more. Contrary to popular belief, long finned species like the Black Veil Angelfish can be kept with barbs and other "fin nipping" species. The key here is that the barbs be kept in proper sized groups, so that they nip at each other instead of nipping at the Angelfish or other species that are not equipped for this type of behavior. Barbs prefer to be kept in groups and their nipping at each other is normal behavior that will not hurt them at all; however, this behavior is too boisterous for many other fish species and damaging to long finned fish species. Angelfish in general require fairly constant water parameters and are less forgiving than many other freshwater community species towards fluctuations in pH or temperature. Like with most South American Cichlid species, the Black Veil Angelfish prefers soft, slightly acidic water with temperatures that stay between 79 and 83 degrees. The Black Veil Angelfish is an omnivore and should be fed a variety of foods including vegetables as well as meaty foods. Feed a quality flake food as well as live and frozen foods such as brine shrimp, bloodworms and tubfex worms. They are particularly fond of bloodworms and it is even believed that feeding Angelfish bloodworms will help stimulate breeding behavior.
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Ashley Gilbert
Altum Angel
(Pterophyllum altum) Moderate Semi-aggressive 6" 55 Gallons 75-82° F, KH 1-5, pH 4.8-6.5 Omnivore Amazon, Columbia Cichlidae Angelfish Community Aquarium The Altum Angel (Pterophyllum altum) originates from the Northern Amazonian regions of Colombia where it is found in the Orinoco and Essequibo river basins. Freshwater Angels are designed to blend into the tree roots and thick vegetation of the river banks where they live, with the shape of their body and their color pattern reflecting this. They utilize the thick vegetation for both protection from larger Cichlid species living in the river and as hunting grounds to prey on small fish species and small invertebrate and crustacean species. Altum Angelfish live in clean clear water conditions provided from the large amount of water flow the rivers generate, but also live near the shoreline in dense vegetation where water currents are low to moderate. Their native rivers provide them with year round stable warm water conditions which include: warm water 80 to 84 °, clean and clear water, acidic water with pH around 5 and plenty of dissolved oxygen in the water. Aquarium hobbyists should look to replicate these water conditions along with aqua-scaping that includes plenty of vegetation and driftwood or wood root. Altum Angels will do well in aquariums that are 55 gallons or larger and have plenty of plants and/or driftwood. As a group freshwater Angelfish are territorial and will squabble with one another until a dominant male is established. They can be kept singularly, in mated pairs or in medium sized groups of 6 or more. Contrary to popular belief, long finned species like the Altum Angel can be kept with barbs and other "fin nipping" species. The key here is that the barbs be kept in proper sized groups, so that they nip at each other instead of nipping at the Angelfish or other species that are not equipped for this type of behavior. Barbs prefer to be kept in groups and their nipping at each other is normal behavior that will not hurt them at all; however, this behavior is too boisterous for many other fish species and damaging to long finned fish species. Angelfish in general require fairly constant water parameters and are less forgiving than many other freshwater community species towards fluctuations in pH or temperature. Like with most South American Cichlid species, the Altum Angel prefers soft, acidic water with temperatures that stay between 79 and 83 degrees. It is important to house Altum Angels with other fish species that are large enough to not be eaten. They will prey on small Tetras like Neon or Cardinal Tetra, picking them off while they sleep. It is very important to acclimate them slowly to their new aquarium, in order to make sure that they do not suffer pH or temperature shock. It is best to pour the fish and the shipping bag water into a plastic bucket and add a medium-fast drip into the bucket from the aquarium. A faster drip will help offset CO2 breakdown from the bag water that will artificially lower the pH in the bucket. The drip should continue for about 30 to 45 minutes and then the fish should be netted or collected via hand and added to the aquarium. The bag water and water siphoned into the bucket should be discarded and not added to the aquarium. Altum Angelfish are omnivores and will eat a wide variety of live and prepared foods that are commonly fed to freshwater tropical fish species. They have a particular love for blood worms and tubifex worms, but will readily consume flake, pellet and frozen foods. They should be fed about twice per day the amount of food that they will consume within 5 minutes. When housed in aquariums with many faster swimming fish species, it may be necessary to increase feedings to 3 times per day to make sure that the Angel is properly fed. Altum Angels will prey on small fish species like small Tetras, Danios or pretty much any small species that will fit into their mouth. They generally wait until the aquarium lights are off for the night and hunt the small fish while they sleep, which makes them easy prey. Because they grow to be a fairly large fish, adult Altum Angels are capable of eating small fish up to 1 to 1.5 inches in length.
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Albino Angel
(Pterophyllum sp.) Easy Semi-Aggressive 6" 30 Gallons 75-82°F, KH 1-8, pH 5.5-7.0 Omnivore Amazon, South America Cichlidae Angelfish Community Aquarium The Albino Angelfish is an omnivore and should be fed a variety of foods including vegetables as well as meaty foods. Feed a quality flake food as well as live and frozen foods such as brine shrimp, bloodworms and tubfex worms. They are particularly fond of bloodworms and it is even believed that feeding Angelfish bloodworms will help stimulate breeding behavior. Albino Angelfish are an albino strain of the species (Pterophyllum sp.) of Anglefish, whose coloration ranges from a white and silver coloration to a yellowish orange coloration with pink eyes. The Albino Angel hails from the warm temperate waters of the Amazon basin in South America, where it is found in calm waterways and flood plains. Albino Angels are found living in areas with losts of plants or tree roots, which they use for protection against larger fish species and as a place to hunt insect larvae and other foodstuffs. These days this species is more commonly tank bred in the United States and parts of Southern Asia, than collected from the wild. They have long been sought after in the aquarium hobby because of their brilliant black body coloration and long flowing fins. Their long fins mean that they should not be kept with fish species that will nip or tear their fins. Many so called fin nipping species can be kept easily with angelfish as long as the fin nippers are kept in groups of 4 or more, so that they will nip at each other and ignore the angelfish. In a small or medium sized aquarium the Albino Angel is best kept in a mated pair, in larger aquariums they can be kept in groups of 6 or more individuals. Albino Angelfish will do well in aquariums that are 30 gallons or larger and have plenty of plants and/or driftwood. As a group freshwater Angelfish are territorial and will squabble with one another until a dominant male is established. They can be kept singularly, in mated pairs or in medium sized groups of 6 or more. Contrary to popular belief, long finned species like the Albino Angelfish can be kept with barbs and other fin nipping species. The key here is that the barbs be kept in proper sized groups, so that they nip at each other instead of nipping at the Angelfish or other species that are not equipped for this type of behavior. Barbs prefer to be kept in groups and their nipping at each other is normal behavior that will not hurt them at all; however, this behavior is too boisterous for many other fish species and damaging to long finned fish species. Angelfish in general require fairly constant water parameters and are less forgiving than many other freshwater community species towards fluctuations in pH or temperature. Like with most South American cichlid species, the Albino Angelfish prefers soft, slightly acidic water with temperatures that stay between 79 and 83 degrees. The Albino Angelfish is an omnivore and should be fed a variety of foods including vegetables as well as meaty foods. Feed a quality flake food as well as live and frozen foods such as brine shrimp, bloodworms and tubfex worms. They are particularly fond of bloodworms and it is even believed that feeding Angelfish bloodworms will help stimulate breeding behavior.
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