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Malu Anemone
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(Heteractis malu) Difficult Aggressive 24" Carnivore Substrate 30 gallons Yes, with caution 72-79° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.024-1.026 Calcium, Magnesium, Strontium, Iodine, Trace Elements Green, Blue, Pink, Red, Tan Fiji, Indonesia, Indo-Pacific Stichodactylidae Anemones The Malu Anemone (Heteractis malu) is a less common species of Sebae Anemone that is known for its brilliant coloration and short plump tentacles. Healthy specimens will vary in color from tan, green and blue to pink and red coloration. Healthy specimens will readily accept chopped marine based meaty foods, will have mouths that are closed, will be very sticky to the touch and will generally located themselves in the aquarium where they receive strong lighting and moderate water flow. Signs that the Malu Anemone is unhappy or unhealthy include a white or bleached out appearance, avoidance of light, a gaping open mouth, lack of stickiness or a consistent shriveled or closed up appearance. Despite rather strict water quality and lighting requirements, Malu Anemones can thrive in established aquariums with proper lighting and water flow conditions. Overall this species is best suited for advanced hobbyists or intermediate hobbyists with well established aquarium systems. Malu Anemones (Heteractis malu) are fairly demanding both in aquarium conditions and in suitable fish and coral tank mates. They require intense aquarium lighting in order for their hosted zooxanthellae to produce food for the anemone, and they require plenty of indirect water flow in order to remove waste products from the anemone. A healthy Heteractis malu anemone will have a pink, blue or tan coloration; as well as, sticky, plump tentacles. They will turn white in color or exhibit a bleached out appearance when they are lacking proper nutrition or lighting. While they can recover via proper feedings and adequate lighting, their somewhat delicate nature makes this difficult. Malu Anemones do best when housed in established aquariums with stable water conditions and quality intense lighting, and should generally only be kept by advanced or expert hobbyists. Once acclimated in an established aquarium with intense lighting and plenty of laminar water flow, Malu Anemones can be very hardy and long lived. The aggressive nature and large size of adult Malue Anemones can make them difficult to keep in aquarium that are not large enough to provide adequate space between the Malu Anemone and other anemones or corals. At an adult size of approximately 2 feet in diameter and requiring about 12 inches of space between itself and other anemones or corals, a larger aquarium is often required to properly housing them depending on their tank mates. However, if not housed with other anemones or corals, Malu Anemones can be kept in aquariums as small as 24 to 30 gallons. Malu Anemones will host a variety of clownfish species including: Sebae Clowns, Tomato Clownfish, Maroon Clownfish, Percula Clownfish, Ocellaris Clownfish and other species as well. Healthy Malu Anemones have very sticky tentacles that pack a potent sting, which they use to kill small fish and invertebrate species and to defend themselves against neighboring anemones and corals. Care should be taken when keeping this anemone species in small aquariums with fish other than Clownfish and other anemones. In large reef aquariums they can coexist with other fish and coral species if they have room to establish themselves away from other anemones and corals. The Malu Anemone receives nutrition from both the zooxanthellae that it hosts and from meaty foods that it captures with its tentacles. Hobbyists will need to house Malu Anemones under intense lighting consisting of either metal halide lighting or high-end compact fluorescent or LED lighting systems. In addition to the food the hosted zooxanthellae produce for the Anemone, they will also need to be fed pieces of meaty marine foods like chopped fish, shrimp, clams, mussel or other similar marine based meaty foods.
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Daum's Reef Lobster
1 like Lobsters
(Enoplometopus daumi) Easy Peaceful 4" Carnivore Substrate & rocks 12 gallons Yes, With caution 72-79° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025 Calcium, Magnesium, Strontium, Iodine, Trace Elements Red, Pink, Purple Indo-Pacific Enoplometopidae Lobsters Daum's Reef Lobster (Enoplometopus daumi) is brightly colored reef lobster with a unique pattern of white spots over a pink, red and purple body. Its brilliant appearance and ability to scavenge excess foodstuffs from the substrate and live rock make it a popular species with marine hobbyists keeping both reef and FOWLR aquariums. The Daum Reef Lobster is a relatively small with a maximum length of 4 inches, with a generally peaceful disposition. Their small size and peaceful temperament make them well suited for reef aquariums that may house smaller fish species and contain a variety of cleaner inverts. However, it should be noted that like all scavengers the Daum's Reef Lobster will prey on other tank mates if they are unable to scavenge enough food to survive. The more peaceful reef lobsters can be distinguished from their larger clawed lobster cousins by the fact that they have full chelae (claws) only on the first pair of pereiopods, the second and third pairs being only subchelate. Clawed lobsters have full claws on the first three pereiopods. Reef lobsters need to be provided plenty of rocky caves and crevices in which they can escape the bright aquarium lighting and to provide them a place to retreat to when they feel threatened. An ideal aquarium environment should have a thick substrate bed to allow the reef lobster to burrow, along with live rock for hiding and in which to hunt. After molting, the Daum's Reef Lobster will need a secure hiding place, such as its burrowed cave, while it waits for its new exoskeleton to harden. The Daum's Reef Lobster is peaceful and will ignore sleeping healthy fish within the aquarium. Caution must be taken when incorporating into a reef aquarium, as it may harm extremely small fish or invertebrates. All Reef Lobsters are very territorial and aggressive towards each other, so only one specimen, or a mated pair should be kept in aquariums of 5 feet in length or less. Hobbyists with larger aquariums that are 6 to 8 feet in length or larger can successfully keep multiple reef lobsters assuming they also have plenty of live rock to create multiple territories within the tank. Like most invertebrates Daum's Reef Lobster is sensitive to high levels of copper in the water from copper-based medications. While Daum's Reef Lobsters prefer to scavenge and hunt for food at night, they will overtime adjust to aquarium life and come out more during lights on hours and during feeding times. Most of their diet will consist of food it scavenges, but supplementing with iodine-rich foods will help ensure proper molting. Proper calcium & iodine levels in the water will aid this species with proper molting and exoskeleton development. Supplemental feeding via sinking shrimp pellets or similar meaty items will ensure that the lobster is well fed and lesson the chance that they will prey on smaller snails, ornamental shrimp or small fish species.
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Voigtmann's Reef Lobster
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(Enoplometopus voigtmanni) Easy Peaceful 4" Omnivore Substrate 12 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025 Calcium, Magnesium, Iodine, Trace Elements Red, Orange, White Indo-Pacific, Caribbean, Tropical Atlantic Ocean Enoplometopidae Lobsters Voigtmann's Reef Lobster (Enoplometopus voigtmanni) is brightly colored reef lobster with a unique pattern of stripes, spots and rings. It brilliant appearance and ability to scavenge excess foodstuffs from the substrate and live rock make it a popular species with marine hobbyists keeping both reef and FOWLR aquariums. Voigtmann's Reef Lobster is a relatively small with a maximum length of 4 inches, with a generally peaceful disposition. Their small size and peaceful temperament make them well suited for reef aquariums that may house smaller fish species and contain a variety of cleaner inverts. However, it should be noted that like all scavengers the Voigtmann's Reef Lobster will prey on other tank mates if they are unable to scavenge enough food to survive. The more peaceful reef lobsters can be distinguished from their larger clawed lobster cousins by the fact that they have full chelae (claws) only on the first pair of pereiopods, the second and third pairs being only subchelate. Clawed lobsters have full claws on the first three pereiopods. Reef lobsters need to be provided plenty of rocky caves and crevices in which they can escape the bright aquarium lighting and to provide them a place to retreat to when they feel threatened. An ideal aquarium environment should have a thick substrate bed to allow the reef lobster to burrow, along with live rock for hiding and in which to hunt. After molting, the Voigtmann's Reef Lobster will need a secure hiding place, such as its burrowed cave, while it waits for its new exoskeleton to harden. The Voigtmann's Reef Lobster is peaceful and will ignore sleeping healthy fish within the aquarium. Caution must be taken when incorporating into a reef aquarium, as it may harm extremely small fish or invertebrates. All Reef Lobsters are very territorial and aggressive towards each other, so only one specimen, or a mated pair should be kept in aquariums of 5 feet in length or less. Hobbyists with larger aquariums that are 6 to 8 feet in length or larger can successfully keep multiple reef lobsters assuming they also have plenty of live rock to create multiple territories within the tank. Like most Invertebrates Voigtmann's Reef Lobster (Enoplometopus voigtmanni) is sensitive to high levels of copper in the water from copper-based medications. While Voigtmann's Reef Lobsters prefer to scavenge and hunt for food at night, they will overtime adjust to aquarium life and come out more during lights on hours and during feeding times. Most of their diet will consist of food it scavenges, but supplementing with iodine-rich foods will help ensure proper molting. Proper calcium & iodine levels in the water will aid this species with proper molting and exoskeleton development. Supplemental feeding via sinking shrimp pellets or similar meaty items will ensure that the lobster is well fed and lesson the chance that they will prey on smaller snails, ornamental shrimp or small fish species.
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Sand Sifting Sea Star
2 likes Starfish
(Astropecten polyacanthus) Easy Peaceful 10" Omnivore Bottom 75 gallons Yes 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025 Iodine, Trace Elements Tan, Brown Fiji, Soloman Islands, Pacific Astropectinidae Starfish The Sand Sifting Sea Star (Astropecten polycanthus) is a highly sought after sand sifter for hobbyists with well established reef aquariums or community FOWLR aquariums. Sand Sifting Sea Stars are excellent at keeping a deep sand bed turned over so that anaerobic bacteria and pockets of toxic gases do not form in the sand bed. However, they are fairly voracious eaters that often wipe out the food sources that they prey on when housed in aquariums that are too small or not well established. Hobbyists who utilize refugiums with their aquarium, have larger aquariums (greater than 75 gallons) or who have well established aquariums will be better able to house Sand Sifting Sea Stars as their system will support higher levels of the critters that Sand Sifting Sea Stars feed on. In addition to a plentiful food source, Sand Sifting Sea Stars need stable water parameters including: salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature and nutrient levels. Hobbyists looking to keep Sand Sifting Sea Stars need to have a deep sand bed in the aquarium both to provide cover / habitat and to provide plenty of habitat for the small organisms that the Sea Star preys on. The beneficial nature of the Sea Star occurs as its moves through the sand bed in search of food, which serves to loosen debris from the sand where it can be either consumed by other organisms or removed from the aquarium via the mechanical filtration. Sand sifting also servers to release pockets of gas that can build up in an aquarium with a deep sand bed. Most hobbyists under estimate the effectiveness of the Sand Sifting Sea Star in its ability to clean the aquarium of small worms, detritus and small crustaceans. This often leads to aquariums that are over stocked on Sea Stars or Starfish being added to aquariums that are too small to support them. Tank mates should consist of peaceful community fish species, corals and other peaceful to semi-aggressive invertebrates. Natural predators to Starfish like Sharks, Pufferfish and Triggers should not be housed with the Sand Sifting Sea Star. Sand Sifting Sea Stars (Astropecten polycanthus) feed on small organisms like worms, copepods, amphipods and other small crustaceans found living within the sand bed of an established aquarium. It is extremely important that aquariums housing Sand Sifting Sea Stars have a deep sand bed of 3 inches or more and be well established. In a well established reef aquarium, hobbyists can expect to successfully keep one Sand Sifting Sea Star per 75 gallons or so. This should provide enough food for the Starfish to survive and the creatures that it feeds on to flourish in numbers large enough to support both their colony and the Sand Sifting Starfish feeding on them.
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Long Tentacle Purple Anemone
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(Macrodactyla doreensis) Moderate Semi-aggressive 14" Carnivore Bottom 30 gallons Yes 72-79° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.023-1.025 Iodine, Trace elements Purple, White, Tan Indo-Pacific, Western Pacific Actiniidae Anemones The Long Tentacle Purple Anemone is often found within the aquarium hobby under a variety of names including: Long Tentacle Anemone, Corkscrew Anemone, Red Base Anemone and Sand Anemone. In the wild Macrodactyla doreensis is found living in shallow reefs and lagoons, where it buries it's foot into the sandy substrate near rocky formations. By burying it's body into the sand and rubble, the Long Tentacle Purple Anemone leaves only it's tentacles exposed. The long tentacles of the Long Tentacle Purple Anemone are used to sting potential prey and to ward off predatory fish and invertebrates. Burying itself in the sand and exposing only the tentacles allows the anemone to feed on meaty items in the water column, while protecting it's vulnerable body from predators. While the Long Tentacle Purple Anemone will sting most fish or inverts that touch it's tentacles, it will host some species of clownfish like the Amphiprion perideraion, Amphiprion sandaracinos, Amphiprion clarkii, Amphiprion melanopus and similar clownfish species. Long Tentacle Purple Anemone's do best in established reef aquariums or FOWLR aquariums that are larger than 30 gallons and have substantial amounts of live rock and sand. Before placing the Long Tentacle Purple Anemone into the aquarium it is important to remove it from it's shipping container and place it into a container with clean salt water for about 20 to 30 minutes. This will a to allow it to purge mucous built up during transport, so that these toxic chemicals are not introduced into the aquarium environment. Long Tentacle Purple Anemones do best in well established aquariums that have a deep sand bed and plenty of live rock. They will look for a location that has both moderate lighting and water flow to bury their foot into the sand at the base of some live rock. The anemone is looking for a location that will allow them to receive adequate lighting to stimulate the zooxanthellae algae that they host; as well as, allow them filter feeding opportunities from foods floating in the water column during feedings. Corals and sessile invertebrates should not be placed within reach of the Long Tentacle Purple Anemone's tentacles as they will sting and damage anything them come in contact with. Fish and mobile invertebrates will generally avoid the stinging cells (nematocysts) of the anemone, but it is possible for them to become prey for the anemone if they are stung and incapacitated. Should the anemone become highly stressed or damaged from being sucked into a filter return or from being damaged by an aggressive fish species, it should be placed into a quarantine aquarium so that the toxic chemicals that it can release to not foul the main aquarium water. While the anemone is recovering in the quarantine aquarium the water should be partially changed daily to avoid toxins from building up in the water. A healthy anemone will open it's tentacles out and will not appear to be stringy or have stringy looking flesh coming off of itself. Having a clownfish hosting with the anemone in the aquarium will help prevent it from being disturbed by other fish or invertebrate species. The Long Tentacle Purple Anemone receives the bulk of it's nutrition through the photosynthetic symbiotic algae zooxanthellae that is hosted on it's body. It also receives a substantial amount of food from meaty items that it filters from the water column using it's tentacles. This filter feeding occurs multiple times per hour, during which time the anemone will open very wide to capture plankton, brine shrimp, mysis shrimp or other meaty items from the water column. Clownfish hosting with the anemone will bring meaty food items back to the anemone as well, and provide them an alternate food source. The anemone should be offered meaty foods multiple times a week via a pipette feeder or via water currents bringing food items to the anemone during normal aquarium feedings. Brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, chopped fish, mussels or other similar meaty items are ideal meaty foods for supplemental feedings.
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Yellow Sea Cucumber
(Colochirus robustus) Expert Peaceful 3" Omnivore (filter feeder) Substrate & Rocks 55 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Yellow Indian Ocean, Western Pacific Cucumariidae Cucumbers The Yellow Sea Cucumber originates from the Indian Ocean and is a highly sought after specie in the aquarium trade for its bright coloration and unique appearance. Yellow Sea Cucumbers are a bright yellow color and have an elongated body with branch-like projections near its mouth. When feeding, the Yellow Sea Cucumber extends their branched feeding arms into the current to catch prey floating in the currents. Yellow Sea Cucumbers make very attractive filter feeders for an established reef aquarium. If kept in small groups, the Yellow Sea Cucumber may spawn in the home aquarium. They may also reproduce by dividing into 2 individuals; however, this may come about due to stress, or may be a sign of good health. The Yellow Sea Cucumber requires live rock to provide the nutrients it needs to sustain its health. It will usually find a location with moderate to strong current in which it can filter-feed plankton any other organisms from the water current. If attacked or injured, the Yellow Sea Cucumber may release mild toxins, but due to its small size, will not pose a threat in the average sized aquarium. The Yellow Sea Cucumber is very sensitive to copper-based medications and it will not tolerate high nitrate levels. The diet of a Yellow Sea Cucumber should include liquid or dried phytoplankton and zoo-plankton. They will also benefit from the substrate being stirred regularly releasing bacteria and detritus into the water. When malnourished, they will shrink in size, and may loose feeding arms; therefore, if these signs are noticed, increase the number of feedings, and target the cucumber with the appropriate food. Caution! Yellow Sea Cucumbers have the ability to releases toxins (venom) that may kill fish in the aquarium when they are severely stressed or damaged by pump intakes or overflows. Do not keep any Yellow Sea Cucumbers with any species of fish that may pick on on the tentacles. These fish include; Butterflyfish, Large Angels, and any species that is listed not safe with invertebrates.
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Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp
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(Stenopus scutellatus) Easy Peaceful 2" Carnivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Red, White, Yellow Caribbean Stenopodidae Shrimp The Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp or also commonly referred to as the Caribbean Boxing Shrimp, has a yellow body and legs, while the chelae and abdomen have red and sometimes white and red bands. This species is a member of the Stenopodidae or "Boxing Shrimp" because of the large pinchers on their third set of legs. They often hold these pinchers erect, giving the appearance of a boxer ready to fight when they feel threatened or are trying to intimidate a rival. Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp are not only attractive in appearance, but are also provide many useful services. Within a community fish aquarium, Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp will remove parasites and dead skin from many fish species, while in the reef aquarium environment they are very efficient at hunting down and eating Bristol worms. Be sure to keep this species singularly and to use caution when keeping them with other less boisterous shrimp species. The Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp needs adequate room in which to move about the aquarium without its long antennae touching neighboring corals or anemones. It is also recommended to provide a good amount of live rock for the Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp to graze for foodstuffs and provide it with caves and crevices when threatened. The Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp must be kept singly, or as a true-mated pair, as it is intolerant of others of the same species. Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp are known to harass other smaller shrimp of different species; such as, peppermint or camel shrimps. It is very hardy species, but must be acclimated slowly to avoid any salinity and/or pH shock and is intolerant of high nitrates or copper levels. It is important to maintain proper iodine levels in the water to allow for proper molting. Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp make interesting and beneficial additions to either reef or peaceful community aquariums. In the wild, the Yellow Banded Coral Shrimp feeds on parasites, dead tissue removed from fish, and other tiny organisms. In the aquarium environment, it will accept most meaty flake and frozen foods, plankton, and other meaty items. Banded Coral Shrimp are also effective bristle worm hunters in the reef aquarium, helping to keep the population of these pests under control.
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Carpet Anemone
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(Stichodactyla sp.) Difficult Aggressive 30" Omnivore Substrate & Rocks 125 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Iodine, Trace elements White, Grey, Pink Indo-Pacific, Atlantic Stichodactylidae Anemones The Carpet Anemone lives singularly on or about reefs or soft sand bottoms in the Indo-Pacific and the Red Sea. These Anemones can attain a size of up to 2 1/2 feet in diameter. They have short tentacles and a potent sting (harmful to humans) along with brightly colored base and tentacles. These anemones serve as a "host" for many types of Clownfish including Amphiprion ocellaris, A. percula, or Dascyllus trimaculatus. In exchange for protection for the Clownfish, the Clownfish will provide the carnivorous anemone with pieces of food (crumbs) that make up a large part of the Anemones diet. Carpet Anemone requires a tank with strong high quality lighting and good water movement. The aquarium should provide both sandy and rocky locations to provide adequate habitat for this species. The Carpet Anemone may prefer one location more than the other and will move about the tank until it finds the location of its choice. This species has a potent sting and may harm corals and other anemones as it moves about the aquarium. It is not compatible with other Anemones within a 12 inch diameter, so be sure to aquascape the aquarium appropriately (keeping in mind anemones can move around as they please). The addition of a clownfish to the aquarium will immediately help with acclimation of this species providing it with a steady food supply. When healthy, it will be very sticky and will be able to grasp something (or someone) and is very difficult to remove it without damaging it. While a 30 gallon aquarium is considered the minimum aquarium size for this species, it is highly recommended that a larger aquarium be used as this species can become quite large (2 1/2 feet) and requires a good amount of space between itself and other invertebrate or coral species (approx. 12 inches). Once acclimated, Carpet Anemones should be fed a diet of fish, shrimp, and other meaty foods. Along with Iodine, Trace Elements, strong lighting (10,000K, Actinic 03 metal halide or power compacts), strong water flow and excellent water quality. Be careful with this species as this colorful Anemone has a It is one of the few anemones that can cause a severe reaction in humans, so keeping one requires great care in handling. This species is very difficult to keep and should only be attempted by expert marine aquarist, zoo, or marine research institutions.
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Turbo Snail
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(Turbo fluctuosa) Easy Peaceful 2" Herbivore Substrate & Rocks 12 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 None Grey, Tan, Brown, Red Caribbean, Mexico Turbinidae Snails The Turbo Snail, which is also commonly referred to as the Turban Snail, Mexican Turbo Snail or Top Shell, is found in holes and crevices of the reef. It is shaped like a top, or turban, and has a thick shell with an iridescent interior. Turbo Snails from the Gulf of California require cooler temperatures; however, most species in the aquarium trade are collected from the warmer waters around Mexico. Turbo Snails are sought after for their ability to eat large amounts of marine algae and cyanobacteria and are included in most algae cleaning crews. The Turbo Snail will do well in an aquarium if provided with ample places to hide and large amounts of room in which to graze for algae, preferably with live rock. The Turbo Snail also grazes on algae on the glass, which is very useful in keeping the algae on the glass under control in the aquarium environment. Since the Turbo Snail uses calcium to build its shell, adequate calcium levels must be maintained in the aquarium. Turbo Snails are very sensitive to high levels of copper-based medications and prefers a low nitrate level. Unfortunately it is extremely difficult to breed Turbo Snails in an aquarium, which means they will need to be replaced from time to time to make sure the algae growth is kept under control. Turbo Snails are very peaceful and are perfect for cleaning algae in either a fish only or reef aquarium. Some times they may be attacked by hermit crabs for their shell, but for the most part they will do well with other species of invertebrates and community fish species. The Turbo Snail is a herbivore and will eat most forms of algae found within the marine aquarium environment, including green hair and cyanobacteria. If insufficient algae is present, the diet should be supplemented with dried seaweed.
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Tube Anemone
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(Cerianthus sp.) Moderate Semi-Aggressive 10" Omnivore Substrate & Rocks 30 gallons Yes 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Iodine, Trace elements Green, Purple, Orange Indo-Pacific Cerianthidae Anemones The Tube Anemone or Tube Dwelling Anemone is a pure reef only species or species only aquarium with a non-abrasive substrate. The Tube Anemone is in actuality a distant cousin of the true sea anemone. Tube Anemones create a tube from the nematocysts that have been previously discharged. The coloration of the Tube Anemone can vary greatly between simple tans/browns to vibrant pink, purple or fluorescent greens. While this species has a moderate care level, this is within the confines of a true reef tank or species only aquarium. This species is not well suited for aquariums with aggressive or boisterous fish or invert species. Tube Anemones should be kept ideally in reef aquariums that have a deep sand bed, plenty of live rock and a refugium in order to create enough of a natural food source. Since Tube Anemones are non-photosynthetic, they do not require intense aquarium lighting. Tube Anemones are in fact nocturnal in nature and will take some time to change over to the illuminated hours of the aquarium environment. With time though, this species will begin to open during lights on periods of time. This species should be initially placed on the sand substrate upon introduction to the aquarium, where it will soon locate itself within a bottom rock crevice. Because Tube Anemones are not photosynthetic, they need to be fed regularly when they are fully expanded. Initially this will be during nocturnal hours, but with some patience this species will gradually shift over to lights on feedings. Feed small frozen foods such as brine or mysis shrimp, chopped pieces of fish and zooplankton. A refugium is highly recommended for this species as an excellent source of copepods and other food stuffs beneficial to the Tube Anemone as well as most other reef aquarium inhabitants. The addition of Trace elements to the system will also benefit the Tube Anemone.
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