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Jeweled Moray Eel
2 likes Eels
(Muraena lentiginosa) Easy Aggressive 24" 90 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Carnivore Eastern Pacific Muraenidae Eels Predatory Jeweled Moray Eels are a delightful, hardy species among the smaller Moray Eels, endemic to the Eastern Pacific, running along the coast of California, Central America, all the way to tropical reefs of South America. Jeweled Moray Eels get their name from their dark, purple-brown to mottled white-gold base coloration with multiple white to yellow, contrasting spots and blotches that commonly have darker borders, making them stand out like "jewels". Jeweled Moray Eels are extremely aggressive and possess a painful bite delivered from a powerful jaw and long, sharp teeth that curve inwards in order to capture and shred their prey while attempting to swallow it whole. Jeweled Moray Eels are popular within the hobby due to their smaller size (relative to their larger cousins) and vibrant appearance; they are sometimes elusive within the hobby, but can generally be found through online retailers and can frequently be special ordered from local vendors. Jeweled Moray Eels should be supplied with an aquarium of at least 90 gallons, a sand substrate, and plenty of live rock, which provides at least one (preferably two) cavernous refuge where it can hide its entire body (make sure the live rock is secure as they are a powerful species and can dislodge rock work). They should also be equipped with efficient biological and mechanical filtration and would greatly benefit from the addition of a quality protein skimmer to assist with organic waste. Eels are known for their excellent escape and jumping skills and should only be housed in an aquarium with a tight-fitting, sealed hood; they are also a nocturnal species and should only be exposed to subdued lighting conditions during their first few days of acclimation to a new environment. Jeweled Moray Eels are highly aggressive and have evolved to specifically prey upon fish (including other eels) that will fit into their mouths; however, they are known to be facultative piscivores and they will also consume benthic crustaceans aside from "cleaner" shrimp of the Hippolysmata, Lysmata, and Periclimenes genera. They are ideally suited for large FOWLR systems with large, aggressive tank mates that will not fit into their mouths; they will not usually get along with conspecifics unless they are a pair of juveniles that have been introduced to a much larger (150+ gallons) aquarium at the same time. Jeweled Moray Eels are facultative, piscivorous carnivores (mainly fish-eaters, but will consume other meaty foods) that feed on fish and crustaceans within their natural habitat. In the aquarium, they should initially be offered live fish and ghost shrimp ("gut-loaded"), but can learn to accept frozen, vitamin-enriched (possibly even freeze-dried) mysis shrimp, krill, silver sides, chopped squid, chopped crab meat, chopped fish, chopped clams, and other meaty marine foods. Feed twice a week for juveniles and once a week for more mature specimens (they appreciate a scheduled routine). A feeding instrument such as a pipette, a prong, or a "stick" is highly recommended as Jeweled Moray Eels have an excellent sense of smell combined with poor eyesight, which can lead to injury.
Redbarred Hawkfish
2 likes Hawkfish
(Cirrhitops fasciatus) Easy Semi-aggressive 5" 30 gallons 72-79° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Carnivore Japan, Hawaii, Western Pacific Cirrhitidae Hawkfish Reef Compatible Redbarred Hawkfish are micro-predators that move about the reef hunting for small crustaceans and fish to prey on. Since they only reach a maximum size of about 5 inches they are not able to prey on fish 2 inches in length or larger. This makes them suitable tank mates for most adult specimens of commonly kept aquarium fish species. They should not be housed with small Gobies, Dartfish or young Chromis, Clownfish, Damselfish, etc; however, adult Clownfish, Chromis, etc. will be fine. Redbarred Hawkfish can eat a wide variety of marine invertebrates and crustaceans, which makes them only partially suitable for reef aquariums. The bright red coloration and interesting swimming style have made the Redbarred Hawkfish a popular aquarium species for some time. They are generally available to hobbyists both in local fish stores and online; however, they are sold under a variety of common names including: Redbarred Hawkfish, Banded Hawkfish, Blood Red Hawkfish and Fasciatus Hawkfish. Despite their common name, Redbarred Hawkfish can vary in coloration from bright red and white to a dark blue or almost black body with red fins. They do they to better blend into their environment, which helps them ambush small prey items moving about the reef and helps protect them from becoming dinner to larger reef predators like Groupers or reef Sharks. Hobbyists will want to house their Redbarred Hawkfish with plenty of live rock in order to bring out their best coloration. Plenty of live rock will also give the Redbarred Hawk many places to perch and move about on. One of the more interesting features of Hawkfish in generally is watching them move about the reef in their half swimming and half crawling style, as they look for the best places on the reef to ambush prey. The Redbarred Hawkfish is a very hardy specimen for aquarium life, that will do well in a 30 gallon or larger aquarium. Despite its relative small size, it is a predatory species and will eat small fish and crustaceans, thus should not be kept with species like small Gobies, Firefishes, small Wrasses etc. In smaller aquariums the Redbarred Hawkfish can be very aggressive towards smaller fish species and fish with a very peaceful disposition. However, in a larger aquarium (90 gallons and up) the Redbarred Hawkfish can be kept very easily with a variety of semi-aggressive community fish species and larger invertebrates and crustaceans. It is important to provide plenty of live rock & rock work to allow plenty of rocky ledges for the Redbarred Hawkfish to perch on, and caves and crevices for it to retreat to when threatened or sleeping. Generally the Redbarred Hawkfish should not be kept with other Hawkfish species as they are very territorial, except for large aquariums with plenty of rock work capable of creating enough territory for multiple specimens. Redbarred Hawkfish are carnivores that in the wild will dwell near the bottom of the reef or on a rocky outcrop looking to prey on small invertebrates and zooplankton. In the aquarium environment they should be provided a diet consisting of a variety of marine based meaty foods including: frozen and flaked meaty preparations, mysis shrimp, brine shrimp or home made foods consisting of chopped mussels, prawns, clams or shrimp. They will also forage for small crustaceans and various species of pods that are generally present in well established aquariums containing plenty of live rock.
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Gary Wayne
Russell's Lionfish
2 likes Lionfish
(Pterois lunulata) Easy Semi-Aggressive 12" 55 gallons 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Carnivore Asia, Africa Scropaenidae Lionfish Fish Only The Russell's Lionfish has quite a few common names including: the Red Volitans, Spotless Lionfish, Soldier Lionfish; Largetail or Military Turkeyfish; and Plaintail Firefish. It is recognizable by its tan with light brown coloration and vertical stripes. The spines on the dorsal, anal, and pectoral fins are fleshy, and not banded like those of other Lionfish. The Russell's Lionfish is one of the larger species, which commonly reaches around a foot in length. This species is also one of the more hardy species and relatively easy to keep in the home aquarium. The spines on the fins are poisonous, and if you are stung, the reaction will be similar to a bee sting only a little stronger, which will cause both pain and swelling. As with all Lionfish care should be exercised when working around them in the aquarium to avoid being stung. The body of the Russell's Lionfish is mostly tan and brown stripes, with some black and white detailing. The pectoral fins are elongated with dark brown markings starting at the body and fading as they progress towards the end of the fins. The rear and anal fins are clear with small dark brown dots and small white stripes. The Russell's Lionfish requires a 55 gallon or larger aquarium with large caves or crevices to provide hiding places. It is a very hardy fish and generally peaceful, except towards other Lionfish or smaller fish that can be swallowed; such as, ornamental shrimp and small fish. The Russell's Lionfish has a semi-aggressive temperament and can be kept with other large fish species ranging from groupers to tangs without problem. It is possible to keep this species in a reef aquarium; however, it will may eat many types of small crustaceans and shrimp. Russell's Lionfish are often shy feeders when first introduced to aquarium life until they become acclimated to the tank. Generally feeding live foods such as feeder shrimp or feeder fish will help stimulate the Russell's Lionfish to begin eating. Once acclimated, the Russell's Lionfish will readily eat meaty foods; such as, chucks of fish, mussels and crustaceans. The spines on the ends of the fins are poisonous and cause pain and swelling to humans if stung.
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Ashley Gilbert
Longhorn Cowfish
2 likes Boxfish
(Lactoria cornuta) Expert Peaceful 20" 150 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Ostraciidae Boxfish Reef Compatible Longhorn Cowfish are extremely popular with hobbyists and are most likely the first name that comes to mind when the species of Boxfish is mentioned. They are a hardy species that can be found grazing among the reefs and sand within less turbulent waters throughout the Indo-Pacific. They are generally peaceful and have an excellent defense against predation by having horns on their foreheads as well as their rear undersides as well as having the ability to secret a venomous ostracitoxin from their already poisonous skin when stressed (ostracitoxin can also be released upon death); care should be taken to keep Longhorn Cowfish comfortable and in a low stress environment as their ostracitoxin can kill other tank inhabitants. Longhorn Cowfish can be found through online vendors, but may sometimes be hard to find; special ordering may be necessary at local retailers. Although they may seem small at a local retailer, Longhorn Cowfish are often seen in the wild at sizes of 20", but generally only reach around 16" in an a home aquarium. They should be housed in nothing less than a 150 gallon system and be provided with plenty of live rock and live sand for shelter and grazing. They love to eat and due to this fact along with their large adult size, they can add a sizable biological load to their aquarium; strong, efficient biological and mechanical filtration is required along with a quality protein skimmer. In the wild they prefer calmer waters and should not be exposed to high, turbulent water movement (low to moderate is recommended). Although they can be reef compatible, a FOWLR system is ultimately recommended as they will not usually harm corals or anemones, but will gladly snack on live snails, tubeworms, small shrimp, and benthic invertebrates in addition to small fish. Longhorn Cowfish are generally peaceful and should be housed with peaceful tank mates that will not cause them stress; however, they can become aggressive with conspecific tank mates and multiple specimens would need a much larger aquarium with plenty of separate territory. Choose tank mates wisely and remember that Longhorn Cowfish have the ability to release ostracitoxin into the water column. Longhorn Cowfish are omnivorous and can be observed in the wild searching for benthic invertebrates in the sand, eat various marine algae, and snacking upon snails, tubeworms, and small fish. They are not picky eaters and in an aquarium environment they will readily accept a wide array of live, frozen, or freeze-dried, and vitamin enriched brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, bloodworms, ghost shrimp, krill, chopped clams, marine algae, mussels, silver sides, snails, and quality, Spirulina-based flake foods for carnivores, omnivores, and herbivores as well as other prepared foods. Longhorn Cowfish, like other boxfish, have teeth that are constantly growing and can be kept in check by the feeding of live snails and various live "feeder" shrimp. Feed 2-3 times a day.
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Ashley Gilbert
Splendid Dottyback
(Pseudochromis splendens) Easy Semi-aggressive 4" 30 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Carnivore Indo-Pacific, Australia Pseudochromidae Pseudochromis / Dottybacks Reef Compatible The Splendid Dottyback (Pseudochromis splendens) is found throughout the Western Indo-Pacific to Australia, where it lives in shallow reefs, reef slopes and outer reef areas. They move about the rocks and corals of the reef feeding on all manner of small worms, pods and micro-inverts that they find living in rocky crevices and within the sand. They are an efficient carnivore that makes an excellent addition to all manner of reef aquariums and FOWLR aquariums with plenty of live rock. Wild caught specimens will often vary in color depending on the food source they were feeding on in the area where they were collected. Specimens fed a high quality diet with balanced vitamins will generally exhibit the more sought after brighter coloration, while specimens who are fed a lower quality diet exhibit a more faded coloration. Splendid Dottyback psuedochromis are also known for being one of the larger species of psuedochromis commonly available within the hobby, as they can reach 4 inches in length. Their larger size coupled with the typical aggressive and territorial nature of psuedochromis makes them aggressive for their size. Due to their somewhat aggressive nature, the Splendid Dottyback should be the only psuedochromis or similarly shaped species in smaller aquariums in order to avoid territorial battles. Large aquariums with plenty of live rock can support multiple psuedochromis specimens or a mixture of psuedochromis and other similarly shaped species. Overall the Splendid Dottyback is a very hardy species that makes a good addition to both reef and FOWLR aquariums. The Splendid Dottyback is at home in aquariums ranging from smaller 30 gallon aquariums all the way up to large reef aquariums. Like most other psuedochromis species they are very territorial towards other psuedochromis and similarly sized and shaped fish species. However, they get along very well with a wide variety of community fish species and are not easily bullied by semi-aggressive species like larger wrasse, parrotfish, hawkfish, angelfish, etc. Splendid Dottybacks will not bother corals, invertebrates or sessile invertebrates which makes them well suited for larger reef aquariums. The exception to this is that they will readily consume bristleworms and small shrimp species like anemone shrimp. However, they are quite aggressive for their size, so they are not well suited for reef aquariums with extremely delicate fish species. They do best in aquariums with plenty of live rock caves and crevices and at least around 30 gallons or so of water volume. They have an aggressive personality for their size, which means that they are not well suited for very small nano aquariums or shy tank mates. Splendid Dottyback psuedochromis need a balanced diet containing a variety of marine based meaty foods. Foods high in vitamins like carotene and vitamin A are required for them to truly thrive and exhibit their brightest coloration. Foods like krill and chopped raw table shrimp are good sources for these vitamins as the plant matter and plankton that these species feed on is high in carotene and vitamin A. A well balanced diet made up of mostly meaty based foods with a small amount of plant matter or algae is best suited to provide all the vitamins and minerals the Splendid Dottyback requires in order to maintain a healthy immune system. Ideally they should be feed two to three times per day an amount that they will consume within five to ten minutes. Good food options include: krill, chopped raw table shrimp, mysis shrimp, brine shrimp, chopped raw mussel, chopped raw squid, chopped raw clam, marine algae and marine sponge. High quality commercial flake and freeze-dried foods designed for marine carnivores are also an excellent food source for this species, and often make up the staple portion of their diet when kept in captivity.
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Gary Wayne
True Percula Clownfish
2 likes Clownfish
(Amphiprion percula) Moderate Semi-aggressive 3" 30 gallons 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Indo-Pacific, Papua New Guinea, Singapore, Solomon Islands Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible The True Percula Clownfish (Amphiprion percula) is possibly the most recognized and popular marine fish species found within the aquarium hobby. Their bright coloration, ease of care and peaceful disposition have made them one of the most popular fish species within the marine aquarium hobby for decades. Their inclusion in movies, commercials and countless publications has made the True Percula Clownfish widely recognizable by both aquarium hobbyists and the general population as well. In addition to their attractive and recognizable color patter, True Percula Clownfish also have an interesting swimming style that is produced by rowing their pectoral fins instead of flapping them like most other fish species. Percula Clownfish are excellent additions for reef aquariums, peaceful community aquariums and larger nano reef aquariums. When describing True Percula Clownfish (Amphiprion percula) it is important to cover the distinction between this species and the similar False Percula (Amphiprion ocellaris). True Percula clownfish generally have 10 dorsal spines with three white bars, with the middle bar having a forward projecting shape. True Percula also have well defined black lines separating the orange and white areas of the fish, often the black areas can be quite thick. The False Percula will typically have 11 dorsal spines and a taller anterior dorsal fin with either no black areas between the orange and white or very thin black outlines separating the orange and white areas of the fish. Percula Clownfish are highly specialized reef fish, who will spend their entire life in a relatively small area on the reef provided that they have a host anemone and adequate food source. Their slow swimming style and ability to live happily in a relatively small space has always made Clownfish ideal for aquarium life. An ideal aquarium setup for Percula Clownfish would include an aquarium of 20 gallons or more, live rock, sand, moderate water flow, peaceful tank mates and a sea anemone host. At a minimum Percula Clownfish should be provided with quality water conditions and peaceful tank mates in order to do well. Percula Clownfish do well in pairs, in small groups of 4 to 6 individuals and singularly. When kept in small groups the two dominant specimens will form a male/female pair, while the rest of the group will stay much smaller in size and will remain asexual. If one of the dominant pair were to be removed or die, one of the asexual members of the group would change their sex to become the male of the mated pair. Clownfish are also commonly referred to as Anemonefish do to their ability and desire to live with a host anemone. Percula Clownfish have established a symbiotic relationship with sea anemones in order to provide them with shelter and protection from reef predators, while providing supplemental food sources for the anemone in the food that they will bring back to their host. Their preferred host anemones are those that are found in their natural reef habitats that range from the Indo-Pacific ocean to Australia in the south and southeast Asia in the north. Some of the best choices for compatible host anemones for Percula Clownfish include: Heteractis magnifica, Stygiomedusa gigantea and Stichodactyla mertensii. In the adsense of a suitable host anemone, some Percula Clownfish will host in some species of corals like Duncan Corals, Torch Corals, Mushroom Leather Corals and other similar species. Wild True Percula Clownfish feed mostly on zooplankton that are present in the currents above the reef and small crustaceans that are found living on the live rock and sand near the Clownfish's host anemone. Wild caught Percula Clownfish adapt quickly to commercial aquarium foods including flake, mini-pellet, frozen and freeze-dried preparations. Also many True Percula Clownfish available within the aquarium hobby trade are from breeders, thus have been fed commercial fish foods their entire lives. It is best to feed them multiple times per day and to vary their diet to include a variety of meaty foods and marine based plant and algae material.
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Ashley Gilbert
Hawaiian Black Triggerfish
(Melichthys indicus) Easy Aggressive 12" 90 gallons 72-78° F; dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4 Carnivore Indo-Pacific Balistidae Triggerfish Fish Only Hawaiian Black Triggerfish can be found living in a variety of locations from Hawaii and central Polynesia westward through Micronesia and Melanasia, East Indies, and the Indian Ocean to the coast of Africa, there are also similar species found in the tropical Western Atlantic Ocean. This species of Triggerfish is easy to care for if provided a large aquarium (100 gallons or larger) with plenty of room to swim, which makes it a good species for the beginning marine aquarists with a larger aquarium. The Hawaiian Black Triggerfish is a very active swimmer that will swim all about the aquarium from one part of the rock work to the other. While not as aggressive as some other Triggerfish (Undulate Trigger & Clown Trigger) the Hawaiian Black Triggerfish is still considered an aggressive species, thus it should only be kept with other larger fish species in a fish-only environment in the home aquarium. Hawaiian Black Triggerfish have oval that appear to be black in color from a distance, but on closer inspection under bright lighting their body is actually has very tightly interlaced dark blue and blue-green areas. The face has light blue accents on the forehead and around the eyes, with two bold white lines at the base of both the dorsal and anal fins. This species grows to about 10 inches and length and has a body that is a little bit more oblique than many other trigger species. Hawaiian Black Triggerfish require large aquariums (100 gallons plus) with both plenty of live rock or other rock work and large open areas for swimming. Similar to other Triggerfish, this species requires rock caves and crevices to swim in and out of and retreat to when feeling threatened, but unlike many other Triggerfish species kept in the aquarium environment, the Hawaiian Black Triggerfish also needs plenty of open room for swimming. In the wild they tend to live right on the outer edge of the reef, where they can sleep and retreat for safety in the coral and rocks, but also have easy access to open water on the edge and above the reef. If kept in smaller aquariums, this species tends to be more aggressive and less tolerant of other similar species. However, if kept in large aquariums with lots of reef or aqua scaping, this species does very well with other aggressive, semi-aggressive or larger community fish species. Hawaiian Black Triggerfish are not recommended for reef aquariums as they can be destructive to some coral species and will often feed on ornamental crabs and shrimps living in the aquarium. Hawaiian Black Triggerfish are omnivores that will appreciate a varied diet of both meaty food items and frozen or flaked herbivore preparations that contain marine algae and are vitamin-enriched. While this species will consume both frozen and flaked preparations, it is best to provide it a varied diet that also includes shrimp, squid, clams, chopped fish and other similar marine based fresh or frozen meaty foods. It is best to feed this species 2 to 3 times per day, what it will consume within 5 minutes. Like many other Triggerfish species, the Hawaiian Black Triggerfish can be trained to hand feed at the surface of the aquarium and is considered a bold feeder.
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Sailfin Blenny
1 like Blennies
(Salarias fasciatus) Moderate Peaceful 5" 30 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Herbivore Indo-Pacific Blenniidae Blennies Reef Compatible The Sailfin Blenny is a cute and easily identifiable species with an entertaining and inquisitive personality. Sailfin Blennies are common among the coral reefs throughout the tropical Indo-Pacific, where they have earned their other common nicknames of Algae Blenny and Sailfin Lawnmower Blenny due to their efficiency at consuming various marine algae. Sailfin Blennies have bushy cirri (whisker-like appendages) protruding from the top of the head (between the eyes) and are equipped with combed teeth for algae grazing. Sailfin Blennies should only be added to well established systems that already contain sufficient marine algae growth along with stable water conditions. Sailfin Blennies are quite peaceful, but will quarrel with conspecifics and similar looking species, although they can get along well with heterospecific tank mates that are not overly aggressive. Sailfin Blennies are an ideal choice for nano aquariums as they have a great personality and the added benefit of helping to control nuisance marine algae within their environment. They are readily available within the hobby and can be purchased from local and online retailers. Sailfin Blennies should be housed in an established aquarium of at least 30 gallons and they require a sufficient amount of live rock for grazing, perching and hiding. Blennies can be excellent jumpers and it's recommended that they be housed in an aquarium with a tightly sealed and secure hood. They also prefer stable water conditions and levels should be regularly checked and maintained with quality biological and mechanical filtration along with routine maintenance and scheduled water changes; the use of a protein skimmer is also recommended. They are generally a peaceful species, but shouldn't be housed with conspecifics or other species with a similar appearance; although they can coexist with many heterospecific tank mates, they should not be kept with overly aggressive fish that will cause them harm or constant stress. They are usually a reef-friendly fish, but they have been reported to pick at coral polyps and clam mantles if under fed. Sailfin Blennies are herbivores and that consume various species of marine algae within their natural habitat. In the home aquarium they should be provided with a wide variety of live or prepared marine algae, vegetable matter, and high-quality, Spirulina-based, prepared foods for omnivores and herbivores; in addition to these food items, they will also graze on ornamental and nuisance algae already present in their aquarium. Feed twice per day, but only what they will consume in a few minutes.
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Flame Angelfish
(Centropyge loriculus) Moderate Semi-aggressive 4" 30 gallons 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Fiji Pomacanthidae Angels (Dwarf) Reef Compatible The Flame Angelfish makes a flashy addition to any aquarium, thus making it one of the most popular dwarf angel species within the marine aquarium hobby. It requires a minimum of a 30 gallon tank with extensive live rock for both grazing and to provide adequate hiding places. The Flame Angelfish is prone to nip at stony and soft corals (sessile invertebrates) and clam mantles, thus it must be kept with some caution in a reef aquarium. Compared to most pygmy angels the Flame is one of the least destructive in the reef environment; therefore, if you want to keep an Angelfish in your reef aquarium, the Flame is the best bet. They adapt well to aquarium life, but should be kept in an established system and housed with dissimilar genera, like other pygmy angels (and most species in general) they do not get along well with others of their own species due to territorial battles that will erupt. Of course large aquariums (100 gallons plus) can provide more territory thus limiting these battles (extensive rock work is required to provide the necessary territory. The Flame Angel is hermaphroditic, thus making it very difficult to breed in an aquarium and has no distinguishable differences in color between male to female. There are slight differences in both coloration and markings of this species based on the location of collection. Marshall Island Flames are more red in color, with thicker black bars running vertically down the body. Cook Island Flames are more orange in coloration with either small black bars, or only a few thin bars running vertically down the body. Christmas Island Flames are normally a red/orange coloration with thin black bars running vertically down the body. It is important to note that these color descriptions are a general guideline, and please expect variation among each fish. Like most species and especially pygmy angelfish the Flame Angelfish is territorial towards both other Flame Angelfish and other pygmy angelfish. Extensive rock work, live rock or reef area is required to give the Flame a suitable environment in the aquarium. The Flame Angelfish will spend most of it's time swimming in and out of the rock work picking at marine algae and small coral polyps. The Flame Angelfish is probably the least destructive pygmy angel to keep in a reef aquarium, but it should be kept with caution as it can nip at corals and polyps and may be damaging to some species of corals. The diet of the Flame Angel should include marine algae, spirulina, high-quality angelfish preparations, and other meaty items such as brine or krill. This species should be fed two to three times daily what the fish will consume within a minute or two. Being an omnivore it is important to provide a balanced diet of algae and meats to provide all the necessary vitamins and nutritional needs.
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Black Cap Basslet
1 like Basslets
(Gramma melacara) Easy Semi-aggressive 3" 30 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Carnivore Western Central Atlantic Grammidae Basslets Reef Compatible The Black Cap Basslet can be found on the edges of reefs within deeper waters in the Western Central Atlantic. They are an ideal addition for reef tanks and beginning hobbyists as they are a brightly colored, beautiful and generally peaceful species that is only a threat to very small invertebrates such as amphipods, copepods, and isopods. They can become territorial with others of their kind, but multiple specimens can coexist in larger aquariums. Black Cap Basslets get their name because of the black, cap-like marking on their heads; adding some style to the welcome splash of color that they bring to the reef with their vivid purple coloration. Although they are very popular, Black Cap Basslets are in high demand and can often be hard to acquire; using an online vendor will bring more success. The Black Cap Basslet should be housed in an aquarium of at least 30 gallons with fine sand to crushed coral substrate and be provided with a sufficient amount of live rock with plenty of hiding places. They can usually be seen darting in and out of the reef and cruising around at mid-level in their aquarium; although they can be quick to vanish at the first sign of danger. They are known jumpers like most other Basslets and a hood or lid of some sort should be in place on their tank. The Black Cap Basslet is generally very peaceful with other tank inhabitants, but they will guard their favorite cave or swimming area; if more than one specimen is desired it's recommended to add them at the same time and to only do so in larger aquariums as they can be somewhat aggressive to their own species. Black Cap Basslets are carnivorous and usually feed on amphipods, copepods, isopods, and other tiny invertebrates within their natural habitat. They should be fed a variety of meaty foods such as live, frozen, freeze-dried, and vitamin enriched brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, finely chopped krill and other sea foods; they will also readily accept small carnivore/omnivore pellets and flake foods. Variety is essential for their beautiful coloration and long term health needs. Feed 1 to 2 times per day.
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