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White Specter Crayfish
2 likes Crayfish
(Procambarus Alleni) Easy 6" 30 Semi-aggressive Omnivore 66-86° F, KH 3-8, pH 6.5-8.0 White Australia Crayfish Parastacidae Crayfish The White Specter Crayfish is a variant of the Electric Blue Crayfish, which originates from the rivers and streams of Florida and the Florida Keys where it is found living amongst the dense vegetation of the river banks and bottom. The White Specter version of these crayfish are selectively bred from Electric Blue Crayfish, and so they can successfully interbreed with their blue cousins. These crayfish can live in almost any freshwater aquarium and are among the toughest freshwater invertebrates available within the hobby. They are very active and will actively explore the aquarium and not simply spend all of their time hiding under rocks. They are well known for keeping tanks clean and free of waste, and are especially useful in large aquariums of 30 gallons or more. Due to their maximum potential size, they should not be kept in aquariums any smaller than 30 gallons. These crayfish can live up to 5 or 6 years old with the proper care. Despite reaching an adult size of about 6 inches, they are actually quite peaceful towards both members of their own species and most fish species as well. They should be provided a freshwater aquarium of at least 30 gallons in size with plenty of rocks, and a substrate with a moderate grain size, sand or mixed sand and gravel substrate in which it can burrow in. White Specter Crayfish are not overly territorial towards their own kind, but they should be housed within aquariums of at least 30 gallons for a single adult specimen and will require larger aquariums for more than one specimen. While they are generally peaceful towards fish species and other invertebrates, they will eat fish that are very small and slow enough for the crayfish to catch. Providing the White Specter Crayfish plenty of easy meals consisting of meat based sinking pellets, blanched vegetables or algae wafers will help curb their aggression towards any fish living in the aquarium, as they will go for the easier meal. White Specter Crayfish also tolerate a wide range of aquarium conditions including pH, GH, temperature and water quality and should do well in any reasonable aquarium setup. As an omnivore, they will readily consume a wide variety of meaty and plant based foodstuffs. They will actively scavenge in the aquarium, eating any foodstuffs that they can find on the aquarium substrate including leftover meaty foods and decaying plant matter. Their diet should consist of meaty foods that they scavenge from the substrate along with naturally occurring algae growth, and should be supplemented with a quality sinking pellet, flake food and dried algae. Provide direct feeding twice per week to begin with and then adjust feeding frequency based on the overall growth rate of the crayfish.
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Sara Bruce
Asian Freshwater Clam
2 likes Clams
(Corbicula sp.) Easy 2" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 65-85° F, pH 6.5-8.0, KH 8-10 Brown, Tan, Black Burma, Thailand, Southern Asia Clams Corbiculidae Clams The Asian Freshwater Clam is found in temperate streams, rivers and lakes throughout Southeast Asia. As with other clams, this species is essentially a living filter that filters the water stream within the aquarium sifting small organic particles from the water column and releasing clean water back into the aquarium. Freshwater Clams help keep uneaten food, detritus and decaying plant matter out of the water column, which help maintain water quality and lower nitrate levels. If necessary the Asian Freshwater Clams diet can be supplemented with invertebrate foods or direct feedings via a pipette. It is important to remember that Freshwater Clams will not tolerate any copper-based medications and can be adversely affected by even small levels of copper present in the water. Ideally this species should be housed in an aquarium of at least 10 gallons with medium to very fine substrate, with sand or clay based substrates being ideal. The Freshwater Clam should not be housed with invertebrate-eating fish, such as freshwater puffers.
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Laura
Mystery Snail
2 likes Snails
(Pomacea bridgesii) Easy 6" 55 Peaceful Omnivore 65-82° F, pH 6.0-8.0, KH 3-8 white, tan, yellow, blue, black South America, Central America, Southeastern US Snails Ampullariidae Snails Mystery Snails are commonly found within the aquarium hobby, and due to their availability, bright coloration and ease of care have also become quite popular with many freshwater aquarium hobbyists. Mystery Snails have a very mixed following with one group of hobbyists loving them, while other hobbyists have come to despise them all together. While they are attractive and are incredible consumers of algae, they do come with some negative traits as well. Due to their healthy appetite they can grow very large and reach sizes upwards of 6 inches, which only compounds the negatives against them. While the pros and cons of this species are very real, the key to keeping the Mystery Snail is keeping them in a suitable environment where their positives can be enjoyed and their negatives minimized. Mystery Snails come in a variety of colors and shell patterns including brown, tan, white or yellow and even blue, purple, pink, and jade, with or without banding on their shells. They exhibit different coloration between their bodies and shells with distinct contrasts like purple bodies and yellow and white shells being quite common. Mystery snails are sold within the aquarium hobby under a variety of names including the golden Mystery snail, ivory snail, blue mystery snail, golden Mystery Snail and most likely others as well. Mystery Snails do best in aquarium environments that take into account their strong appetites for algae and other vegetable matter along with their large size. They have an appetite for more than just algae as they will readily consume vegetable matter, invertebrate pellets and some live plants as well if sufficient algae or other more desirable foodstuffs are not available. They will also out compete many other invertebrate species for food, as they use their size to push other invertebrates like shrimp away from food that falls to the substrate. Mystery Snails have very healthy appetites and will quickly turn to other foodstuffs if algae is not available. It is for this reason that they are not recommended for many planted aquariums as they can put a lot of pressure on delicate or slow growing plant species. While Mystery Snails prefer algae, they will readily consume vegetables, plants, fish foods, brine shrimp, insects and even dead fish or other decaying matter that they come across while scavenging the aquarium bottom. If you keep this species with live plants be sure to provide them algae wafers, vegetable based sinking pellets or pieces of vegetable so that they will not turn on the plants living in the aquarium. In the home aquarium, Mystery Snails are more active at night, while during the day they will usually stay in more shaded or darker area of the aquarium. When it is night time, the Mystery snail becomes active and engages in behaviors relating to feeding, as well as mating and laying eggs. They are very easy to breed and if reasonable aquarium conditions of warm water temperatures and clean water are met, they will most likely breed to the point where excess specimens will need to be removed from the aquarium.
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Laura
Blue Tiger Shrimp
2 likes Shrimp
(Caridina cf. cantonensis) Easy 2" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 68-78° F, KH 2-10, pH 6.0-7.3 Blue, White, Transparent Southeast Asia Shrimp Atyidae Shrimp Blue Tiger Shrimp are a color variant of the Southeast Asian Tiger Shrimp, where they have been selectively bred over the years to accentuate the blue color morph found in some naturally occurring Tiger Shrimp. Blue Tiger Shrimp are a tropical shrimp species found commonly within lakes and slow moving rivers and streams. They have become very popular within the aquarium hobby over the years due to their relative ease of care and beautiful coloration and behaviors. Blue Tiger Shrimp can successfully be kept with other dwarf shrimp or in peaceful community aquariums that have a mature filtration system and stable water parameters. Blue Tiger Shrimp are considered a very hardy species of tropical dwarf shrimp that can be at home in a dwarf shrimp species only aquarium or a peaceful community aquarium. They do best in aquariums that have a mature biological filtration system, stable water parameters and water that is slightly acidic. When kept in water that is alkaline, the Blue Tiger Shrimp is more prone to have a shorter life span and is unlikely to breed. When kept within an aquarium with softer and slightly acidic water, the Blue Tiger Shrimp has been known to be a prolific breeder with a lifespan of close to 2 years. They do best in aquariums with plants, rocks and driftwood on which they can graze for naturally growing algae and to seek shelter when they feel threatened. As with most all invertebrates, Blue Tiger Shrimp are very sensitive to copper, thus copper based medicines should not be used in aquariums housing Blue Tiger Shrimp. Blue Tiger Shrimp spend much of their time in the wild grazing on algae and decaying vegetation that settles on the lake bottom. Their diet when housed in an aquarium environment should also contain a large amount of algae and vegetable matter in it with a smaller portion of their diet coming from meaty foods. If there isn't enough algae present within the aquarium to sustain the shrimp colony, they can be fed blanched vegetables, sinking algae wafers or pellets and other sinking commercial foods intended for bottom dwelling fish and invertebrates. The Blue Tiger Shrimp is considered easy to breed as they do not have any special breeding requirements and have a long history of successful breeding within the aquarium environment. The main requirement to breed Blue Tiger Shrimp is to provide them an aquarium with stable water parameters that are very close to the following: Ph 6 - 7.25, Temperature 68 - 75 and Hardness 2 - 10 dkh. Lastly, the breeding aquarium must have a least one male and one female and given the correct water parameters they should have no trouble breeding. Females can be differentiated from male Blue Tiger Shrimps as they will have a longer and wider tail section and be slightly larger overall.
Cardinal Shrimp
2 likes Shrimp
(Caridina sp.) Moderate 1" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 74-85° F, KH 3-10, pH 7.4-8.4 Red Sulawesi Indonesia Shrimp Atyidae Shrimp Cardinal Shrimp are a smaller tropical species of dwarf shrimp that originate from the lakes of the Sulawesi region of Indonesia. While a little smaller than many of their contemporaries, they are a long lived species that tend to live on average about 6 months to 1 year longer than the average dwarf shrimp. Their bright red coloration made them an instant hit in the aquarium hobby, and their relative ease of care and active lifestyle have helped to retain their very high popularity. While somewhat shy at first, an established group of Cardinal Shrimp will become quite active and exhibit a variety of interesting social behaviors that are very enjoyable to watch. Housing for the Cardinal Shrimp should consist of a well cycled mature aquarium with stable water parameters and high quality filtration. Cardinal Shrimp are less tolerant of water fluctuations and poor water conditions than some species. However, once they are acclimated to their environment they are not difficult to care for. They are a tropical species that prefer warmer water temperatures than most dwarf shrimp species, with an ideal temperature or around 78° being preferred. Along with the elevated temperatures, Cardinal Shrimp also prefer a slightly higher Ph of around 7.8 to 8.0. They should be kept in an aquarium with plenty of moss or algae covered rocks or driftwood and will also benefit from the presence of plants or grasses on which to graze and seek shelter when they feel threatened. Cardinal Shrimp spend most of their time grazing for algae or decaying plant matter, thus a large portion of their diet should be algae and plant based. If they are kept in an aquarium with insufficient algae growth, they can be fed algae wafers or sinking vegetarian pellets. However, they are true omnivores and will readily consume crushed flake foods, blood worms, tubifex worms, crushed pellet foods and blanched vegetables such as spinach. Breeding Cardinal Shrimp is a relatively easy and straight forward process, provided that they are housed in a proper environment. When kept in an aquarium with the proper water parameters, the Cardinal Shrimp simply needs a steady food source and the presence of both male and female shrimps and it is a good bet that they will breed. While easier to breed than most dwarf shrimp species, the Cardinal Shrimp does have fewer babies per spawn.
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Tracy Lee
Singapore Flower Shrimp
2 likes Shrimp
(Atyopsis moluccensis) Easy 3" 20 Peaceful Omnivore 68-85° F, KH 3-10, pH 6.5-8.0 Red, Brown, Tan, Green, Yellow Asia Shrimp Atyidae Shrimp The Singapore Flower Shrimp or as it is also commonly know as the Asian Fan Shrimp or Bamboo Shrimp, originates from fast moving rivers and streams within Southeast Asia. They can vary greatly in coloration, ranging from a brown body with tan stripe all the way to red, green or yellow body colors with a tan to white stripe. They can change their coloration rapidly based on their surroundings and whether or not they feel stressed or scared. Their front six legs have fan-like appendages in which they use to filter the water for foodstuffs present within the water column. They add a very interesting element to any freshwater community aquarium, both with their diverse coloration and their unique feeding process. Their coloration, movement and feeding and their usefulness as aquarium cleaners has made the Singapore Flower Shrimp very popular among freshwater aquarium hobbyists over the past few years. Singapore Flower Shrimp should be housed in established freshwater aquariums of at least 20 gallons, that provide plenty of hiding places including plants and driftwood along with a mature substrate that will provide plenty of detritus and decaying plant matter for the shrimp to feed on. It should be housed with peaceful community fish that will not pose a threat of eating or damaging the shrimp. The Singapore Shrimp is easy to sex when it becomes mature as the males will have much larger and thicker forelegs than the females, also the females forelegs are about the same size as the second pair of legs. While this shrimp is easy to sex, it is extremely difficult to breed, as it requires brackish water for breeding and to raise the newly hatched larvae. The young exist in a drifting, planktonic state before changing into a miniature adult-like form after several molts. The Singapore Shrimp is an omnivore that primarily consumes detritus and plant matter suspended in the water column, but will also eat algae and leftover meaty foods that are either in the water column or resting on the aquarium substrate. They use fan-like appendages located near their head to filter small food particles from the water. Ideally this specimen should be kept in a well established planted aquarium, so that they will have plenty of decaying plant matter and algae available to them from the water column. Otherwise they can be fed sinking pellet foods that they can feed off of as they breakdown in the water near the substrate.
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Tracy Lee
Crystal Red Shrimp
1 like Shrimp
(Caridina cf. cantonensis) Moderate 2" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 62-74° F, KH 1-5, pH 5.8-6.8 Red, White Southeast Asia Shrimp Atyidae Shrimp Crystal Red Shrimp are widely considered to be the most popular of the tropical dwarf shrimp species found within the aquarium hobby. Their brilliant coloration and pattern, along with their peaceful docile demeanor have made them a worldwide favorite with hobbyists. Crystal Red Shrimp are a selectively bred species of Bee Shrimp, that have been bred for their red color variant. Originally developed in Japan, the Crystal Red Shrimp are now selectively bred around the world by a variety of commercial institutions and hobbyists alike. In addition to their striking coloration, Crystal Red Shrimp are also prized for their peaceful nature and interactive colonies that can be a true joy to watch. When kept in proper water conditions, this species can live close to 2 years and will happily co-exist with other Crystal Red Shrimp or other peaceful invertebrate or fish species. Crystal Red Shrimp require an established aquarium with stable water parameters and a high level of water quality. Selective breeding has made this species less tolerant of poor water conditions than wild species of dwarf shrimp. They require an established aquarium that has very low nitrates and soft slightly acidic water that ranges from the mid 60's to low 70's in temperature. The aquarium should contain a sand or fine gravel substrate along with a good amount of plants, rocks and driftwood in order to provide a proper habitat. Crystal Red Shrimp will appreciate having caves and crevices to retreat to when they feel threatened of to retreat from the often bright aquarium lights. Tank mates should include other peaceful varieties of freshwater invertebrates and smaller peaceful tropical community fish species. Hobbyists who intend to breed the Crystal Red Shrimp, should keep a small colony of them in a species only aquarium that maintains stable water conditions with no potential fish or invertebrate predators. Lastly, Crystal Red Shrimp, like all dwarf freshwater shrimp species and most invertebrates, should not be exposed to copper or copper based medicines as copper is toxic to them and any elevated levels of copper within the aquarium can kill them. As with most all freshwater shrimp species, the Crystal Red Shrimp is an omnivore that will readily scavenge the aquarium for a wide variety of food items including both plant and animal based. The bulk of their diet in nature is made up of algae consumption and thus they should be provided plenty of algae or plant based materials within the aquarium as well. They will also readily consume commercial foods designed for bottom feeding fish and invert species along with a wide variety of flaked or pellet commercial foods. The Crystal Red Shrimp will also readily accept blanched vegetables such as spinach or similar greens. The key to breeding Crystal Red Shrimp is to maintain water parameters that are as close to possible to ideal conditions for the species. Ideal water conditions for breeding Crystal Red Shrimp are a temperature of 68°, Ph of 6.2 and a water hardness dkh of 3. The aquarium should also contain some rocks, plants or driftwood in order to provide the shrimp with a sense of security and to simulate natural conditions. Once the breeding aquarium meets the necessary water parameters a group of male and female shrimp will typically have no problems successfully breeding. It can be slightly difficult to determine the sex of the Crystal Red Shrimp; however, the males are generally smaller in size and have tail sections that are shorter and thinner than the females of the species.
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Blue Pearl Shrimp
1 like Shrimp
(Neocaridina cf. zhangjiajiensis var. blue) Easy 2" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 68-80° F, KH 3-10, pH 6.5-7.5 Blue, Transparent Selectively bred in Germany Shrimp Atyidae Shrimp The Blue Pearl Shrimp is a colorful selectively bred species of the wild Neocaridina cf. zhangjiajiensis of Southeast Asia. Ulf Gottschalk of Germany was able over a period of years to selectively breed two very attractive variants of the Neocaridina cf. zhangjiajiensis, resulting in the blue ice colored Blue Pearl Shrimp and the pure white Snow Ball Shrimp. Thanks to the tedious breeding efforts of Ulf Gottschalk the hobbyist now has access to a brilliantly colored light metallic blue shrimp species that stands out from other dwarf shrimps species including other darker blue species. Without a doubt, the Blue Pearl Shrimp brings a brilliant blue appearance to the peaceful tropical community aquarium or shrimp nano aquarium that is truly beautiful and unique. Blue Pearl Shrimp should be kept with peaceful freshwater fish species in either a planted aquarium or a community aquarium with plenty of plants, rocks or driftwood to provide them with cover when threatened and a place to forage for algae. Like most freshwater invertebrate species, the Blue Pearl Shrimp needs clean water with stable water parameters and very good filtration in order to thrive within an aquarium environment. They do very well in community shrimp tanks or tropical community fish tanks with peaceful fish species. It is also important to not expose this or other invertebrate species to copper based medications as this can kill them. Blue Pearl Shrimp should not be housed with aggressive fish species or with community species such as loaches and puffers as they eat small shrimps in the wild. Blue Pearl Shrimp feed primarily on freshwater algae, and are coveted for this as they make excellent tank cleaners. However, they will also consume detritus and uneaten foodstuffs that they come across in the aquarium substrate. If no algae is present within the aquarium, it is recommended to supplement the Blue Pearl Shrimps diet with algae tablets as algae makes up a very large portion of their diet in the wild and will help them maintain a healthy immune system. They can also be fed blanched vegetables, sinking pellets and other sinking commercial foods intended for bottom dwelling fish and invertebrates. Blue Pearl Shrimp are one of the easier freshwater shrimp species to breed within the home aquarium environment. At approximately 2 to 3 months of age, Blue Pearl Shrimp will become sexually mature, and the females will begin to carry a clutch of yellowish eggs under their tail. If there are males present within the aquarium, the female will become impregnated and the clutch of eggs will hatch in about 1 month. The eggs will be carried by the female until they hatch into miniature replicas of their parents, as the Blue Pearl Shrimp does not go through an intermediate plankton stage. At birth, the baby Blue Pearl Shrimp are very small and are easily eaten by fish or sucked up into filters. Therefore, they should be provided their own breeding tank with a sponge covered filter intake and no fish present that could eat the young. The babies should be fed a diet consisting of algae, algae tablets, baby brine shrimp or crushed flake foods. It is important to maintain the water quality of the breeding tank to high levels and make sure that ammonia and nitrite levels remain very low. It is important to note that as a selectively bred species, the Blue Pearl Shrimp has been engineered to produce the its blue coloration. What this means is that when they breed, they will produce offspring with the same light blue coloration as this is what they have been designed to do. Crossing them with another species of Neocaridina will not result in an attractive color morph, but will instead create very non attractive offspring that essentially defeats the purpose of even keeping a selectively bred species.
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Ghost Shrimp
1 like Shrimp
(Palaemonetes sp.) Easy 2" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 68-86° F, pH 6.5-8.0, KH 3-10 Clear, Yellow, White Americas Shrimp Palaeomonidae Shrimp Ghost Shrimp are a species of tropical freshwater shrimp that have become popular in the aquarium hobby due to their interesting appearance and beneficial aquarium substrate cleaning. They are also commonly referred to as Glass Shrimp, with both names emanating from their transparent appearance. They generally spend their time moving about the aquarium substrate looking for food particles that are lodged in the substrate or on plant leaves or roots. Typically Ghost Shrimp are added to community aquariums, where they can be kept with a large variety of peaceful community fish species that are small enough not to see the Ghost Shrimp as food. Hobbyists who keep larger Cichlid species also keep Ghost Shrimp as a food source for larger more aggressive fish species. Ornamental shrmip like the Ghost Shrimp are a great addition to any community aquarium with smaller fish species that the shrimp will be safe from being eaten by, as they are great helpers in keeping your aquarium clean and your water quality high. Depending on the amount of bottom feeders Ghost Shrimp can very safely be kept in numbers of approximately 1 shrimp per 3 gallons of water, with higher concentrations possible depending on food sources and competition. It is best to keep Ghost Shrimp in 10 gallon or larger aquariums with plenty of hiding places including plants and rock caves. Ghost Shrimp moult as they grow and during this period their shells are soft and they become vulnerable to fish and other aquarium inhabitants, thus it is important to provide them plenty of shelter consisting of hiding places too small for fish to get into. This is especially important after moulting and before their exoskeletons have had a chance to harden. Ghost Shrimp prefer temperate waters and should be kept in water temperatures ranging from 68 to 82 degrees. Ghost Shrimp are pure scavengers and will readily accept a vast variety of meaty foods and decaying plant matter. They will scavenge the substrate and plants for any food particles that make it past the aquariums other inhabitants. It is also not uncommon for them to even swim up to the surface and take flake food directly, especially after they become established with their surroundings. Ghost Shrimp can easily be bred in a smaller breeder tank setup or species only aquarium. While breeding the shrimp is not difficult, feeding the fry can be as they require very small food particles. It is best to raise them in an established tank with some algae growth and plenty of small foodstuffs; such as, infusoria or baby brine shrimps.
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Amano Shrimp
1 like Shrimp
(Caridina multidentata) Easy 2" 12 Peaceful Omnivore 65-82° F, pH 6.0-8.0, KH 3-10 Tan, Transparent, Brown Japan Shrimp Palaemonidae Shrimp Amano Shrimp as they are known these days were once known as Japonica Shrimp, as they were named after their previous scientific name or (Caridina japonica). However, these days their scientific name has been changed to (Caridina multidentata) and there common name changed to the Amano Shrimp to pay homage to the legendary aquarist and photographer Takashi Amano. Mr. Amano was responsible for introducing this very beneficial and interesting shrimp species to the aquarium hobby as he kept them in many of his tanks and people gradually began to take notice at how useful they were and the added dimension of interest that they brought to every aquarium in which they lived. While the Amano Shrimp was initially added to aquariums to consume unwanted algae, aquarists quickly learned that they also brought a lot of interest and diversity to the freshwater community aquarium and were simply just fun to watch. Amano Shrimp are ideal additions for any peaceful tropical freshwater community aquarium. They will co-exist with a wide variety of fish and plant species without causing any harm and providing beneficial algae eating services. Amano Shrimp are very tolerant of a wide range of water conditions and will make themselves at home in most any aquarium. They should be provided places to seek refuge when needed; such as, driftwood, rock caves or crevices or live or ornamental plants. Like all shrimp species, the Amano Shrimp will molt approximately once a month and will need to have places like rock caves or underneath driftwood to hide while their new shells hardens, otherwise they may be injured while their shell is soft and exposing their internal body. Amano Shrimp are fantastic consumers of all types of freshwater algae, thus algae growing in the aquarium should make up a portion of their diet. If enough algae is not present in the aquarium, Amano Shrimp will readily feed on a variety of commonly available aquarium foodstuffs including: algae pellets & wafers, blanched vegetables (spinach, squash, zucchini, etc.), shrimp pellets, fish flakes or just about any other foodstuff fed to fish that they can scavenge from the aquarium substrate. Be sure to remove any excess vegetable matter that is not consumed within a few hours from the aquarium so that it does not decompose and degrade the aquariums water quality. Like many freshwater invertebrate species, the Amano Shrimp requires a brackish environment for their larvae to develop, thus they cannot be bred within the freshwater community aquarium. However, if introduced into a suitable brackish environment, Amano Shrimp can be successfully bred in an aquarium setup. The female Amano Shrimp carry the eggs under the rear portion of their body until the eggs hatch into larvae. Unlike many other shrimp species, the Amano Shrimp young hatch into larvae instead of miniature versions of the adult. It is at this larvae stage that they are most delicate and require a lot of care. During their larval stage, the young Amano Shrimp should be kept in a brackish tank with low filtration, gently aeration and a constant temperature in the low to mid 70’s for about 20 days. At this time they should have morphed into their post larval stage, at which point they will be ready to be transitioned back into a freshwater environment. It is best to raise the larvae in aquariums that are well established with plenty of naturally occurring algae present in the aquarium.
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