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Florida Fiddler Crab
1 like Crabs
(Uca sp.) Easy 2" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 74-84° F, KH 12-30, pH 7.8-8.4 Brown, Grey, Black, Red, Yellow Florida Crabs Ocypodidae Crabs The Florida Fiddler Crab (Uca sp.) is a variety of Fiddler Crab that is most commonly found within the aquarium hobby. Florida Fiddler Crabs are from the genus Uca, which consists of over 100 species of crabs commonly found in brackish coastal areas like mangrove swamps, salt marshes and sandy or muddy beach areas. The Florida Fiddler Crab is commonly seen within the aquarium hobby due to its small size, ease of care and ready availability. The species is often sold under a variety of common names including: Florida Fiddler Crab, Fiddler Crab, Signal Crab, Mini Crab, Calling Crab and Uca Crab. All crabs from the genus Uca are semi-aquatic in that they spend part of their time underwater and part of their time on land. To thrive in the aquarium environment the Florida Fiddler Crab will need either brackish water or freshwater with some aquarium salt added in order for the crab to be able to molt correctly. Also important in the molting process is adequate calcium and trace minerals, which can be provided by salt mixes or aragonite based substrates. Florida Fiddler Crabs will also need access to some area within the aquarium that is above the waterline. Ideally an area made up of sand, mud or a mix of the two combined with rocks, driftwood, shells of similar items under which to hide. The land portion of the aquarium should contain substrate that is deep enough to allow the crab to burrow under the sand, while providing a gradual transition into the water portion of the aquarium to allow easy access to both sections of the tank. Despite only spending part of their time in the water, the Florida Fiddler Crab requires proper water conditions in order to thrive. Since the crab spends a good portion of its life in the water, proper water quality and aquarium conditions should be maintained via a proper aquarium filter, heater and partial water changes. Florida Fiddler Crabs are more than capable escape artists who use power cables, filter tubes or other items that go in and out of the aquarium to climb out and escape. Hobbyists will need to have a secure and tight fitting lid on the aquarium to prevent the crab from climbing out. As with all crabs, the Florida Fiddler Crab is a true omnivorous scavenger that will consume a wide variety of organic material. Florida Fiddler Crabs will happily scavenge decaying plant matter, meaty foods and even detritus. Hobbyists should feed them flake foods, mini pellets, algae wafers or pellets, small worms or brine shrimp. Fiddler Crabs have a fairly short lifespan of approximately 1 to 2 years; however, during this time they live very active and interesting lives. They are avid explorers and feeders who will actively scavenge the entire aquarium looking for morsels of food and new places to explore. They are also avid breeders with males on the look out for suitable females which to court. During courtship, the males will wave their over sized claws above their head and tap them on the ground in an effort to attract nearby females. As one can imagine, multiple males within the same aquarium will often fight over the available females. Occasionally during these scraps a male crab will lose their big claw, in which case the smaller one will begin to grow larger and the lost claw will regenerate into a new (small) claw. Only the male of the species has this large brightly colored claw, with which it "calls" or signals the female crabs. The females simply have two small claws that are grey or tan in color.
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White Specter Crayfish
2 likes Crayfish
(Procambarus Alleni) Easy 6" 30 Semi-aggressive Omnivore 66-86° F, KH 3-8, pH 6.5-8.0 White Australia Crayfish Parastacidae Crayfish The White Specter Crayfish is a variant of the Electric Blue Crayfish, which originates from the rivers and streams of Florida and the Florida Keys where it is found living amongst the dense vegetation of the river banks and bottom. The White Specter version of these crayfish are selectively bred from Electric Blue Crayfish, and so they can successfully interbreed with their blue cousins. These crayfish can live in almost any freshwater aquarium and are among the toughest freshwater invertebrates available within the hobby. They are very active and will actively explore the aquarium and not simply spend all of their time hiding under rocks. They are well known for keeping tanks clean and free of waste, and are especially useful in large aquariums of 30 gallons or more. Due to their maximum potential size, they should not be kept in aquariums any smaller than 30 gallons. These crayfish can live up to 5 or 6 years old with the proper care. Despite reaching an adult size of about 6 inches, they are actually quite peaceful towards both members of their own species and most fish species as well. They should be provided a freshwater aquarium of at least 30 gallons in size with plenty of rocks, and a substrate with a moderate grain size, sand or mixed sand and gravel substrate in which it can burrow in. White Specter Crayfish are not overly territorial towards their own kind, but they should be housed within aquariums of at least 30 gallons for a single adult specimen and will require larger aquariums for more than one specimen. While they are generally peaceful towards fish species and other invertebrates, they will eat fish that are very small and slow enough for the crayfish to catch. Providing the White Specter Crayfish plenty of easy meals consisting of meat based sinking pellets, blanched vegetables or algae wafers will help curb their aggression towards any fish living in the aquarium, as they will go for the easier meal. White Specter Crayfish also tolerate a wide range of aquarium conditions including pH, GH, temperature and water quality and should do well in any reasonable aquarium setup. As an omnivore, they will readily consume a wide variety of meaty and plant based foodstuffs. They will actively scavenge in the aquarium, eating any foodstuffs that they can find on the aquarium substrate including leftover meaty foods and decaying plant matter. Their diet should consist of meaty foods that they scavenge from the substrate along with naturally occurring algae growth, and should be supplemented with a quality sinking pellet, flake food and dried algae. Provide direct feeding twice per week to begin with and then adjust feeding frequency based on the overall growth rate of the crayfish.
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Dwarf Orange Crayfish
1 like Crayfish
(Cambarellus patzcuarensis sp. Orange) Easy 2" 5 Peaceful Omnivore 64-80° F, pH 6.8-8.0, KH 12-15 Orange, Tan Selective Breeding Crayfish Cambariidae Crayfish The Dwarf Orange Crayfish (Cambarellus patzcuarensis sp. Orange) is a wonderfully attractive selectively bred Crayfish that is priced for its coloration, temperament and small size. German breeders were able to combine multiple strains of Cambarellus patzcuarensis to obtain the wonderful orange coloration and small size of the Orange Dwarf Crayfish. Overall this species is very peaceful and should not bother live plants, fish or other inverts unless very hungry or if the fish or invert is extremely small. Unlike many of the larger ornamental crayfish who become more aggressive towards small fish, the Dwarf Orange Crayfish maintains a small size and peaceful demeanor, which makes them ideal substrate cleaners for peaceful community aquariums. Dwarf Orange Crayfish have very minimal husbandry requirements;however, an ideal setup would contain a soil/gravel substrate, rock or driftwood hiding places, some plants and a basic filter to maintain water quality and oxygenate the water. Hobbyists looking to keep multiple specimens should make sure that their is a hiding place for each specimen in order to limit aggression and provide a comfortable environment. Fish species like Loaches or many Cichlid species should be avoided as they will feed on moulting and young crayfish. Like most crayfish, the Dwarf Orange Crayfish is an omnivore and will eat a variety of decaying plant matter, meaty foods, detritus and even a very small slow swimming fish if he can catch one. They are not aggressive towards fish, plants or other crayfish, but may predate on extremely small fish or fry. They do best when fed a diet containing a variety of foods including: blanched vegetables (carrots, spinach, peas, zucchini, squash, etc.), spirulina tabs, artemia, krill, tubifex worms, white worms, chopped earthworms, blood worms, commercial flake and pellet foods.
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Malaysian Trumpet Snail
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(Melanoides tuberculata) Easy 1" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 68-80° F, dkh 9-13, pH 7.0-8.0 Varied Malaysia Snails Thiaridae Snails For aquarium hobbyist's who are looking for a beneficial snail species to consume excess algae and detritus in their planted or tropical community aquarium, they need look no further then the Malaysian Trumpet Snail. Malaysian Trumpet Snail are an attractive species of tropical snails that have a variety of shapes, colors and patterns which provide not only aesthetic beauty, but bring functional utility as well. They are renowned for their ability to clean algae from aquarium glass, plants and rocks; as well as, burrowing into the substrate to eat detritus and aerate the substrate. All in all they bring a lot of biological benefits to the aquarium and look good while they do it. While some snails have developed a reputation as an aquarium pest, the Malaysian Trumpet Snail has firmly established itself as a very desirable addition to any tropical community or planted community aquarium. Malaysian Trumpet Snail's do very well in a variety of tropical aquarium setups ranging from shrimp tanks to community fish and planted aquariums. They can handle a relatively wide range of temperatures and water conditions, given that the changes are gradual. While they do not have specific aquarium requirements, they do best in established aquariums that have stable water conditions and existing algae and detritus on which they can feed. Malaysian Trumpet Snail's have become very popular within the hobby as they do not tend to over multiply and will not consume live plants or sinking foods meant for bottom dwelling fish or inverts. They are also quite beneficial as they clean and aerate the aquarium substrate and clean algae from aquarium glass and plants. They should not be exposed to copper or copper based medicines as these can harm or kill snails and other invertebrates. The Malaysian Trumpet Snail's diet is ideal for the community aquarium hobbyist, as they consume both algae and detritus. They do not harm live plants and can even benefit them by eating algae that grows on the plants leaves. Malaysian Trumpet Snail's should not need supplemental feeding when kept in established planted or community aquariums as they will generally find plenty of detritus in the substrate and algae growth to keep them well fed. However, in less established aquariums they can be fed sinking algae pellets or wafers to supplement their diet. Like most tropical snail species, the Malaysian Trumpet Snail is a prolific breeder that will multiply based on the conditions and amount of food available to them. When kept in an aquarium without an over-abundance of algae or detritus, the Malaysian Trumpet Snail should not breed to problematic levels. In fact if the Malaysian Trumpet Snail begins to breed too large of numbers, it is a clear sign that the aquarium has an over-abundance of detritus or algae present in the system. Malaysian Trumpet Snail produce live young instead of eggs and do not have any special breeding requirements.
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Malaya Shrimp
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(Caridina sp. 'Malaya') Easy 3" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 65-78° F, dkh 3-12, pH 6.8-7.8 clear, gold, brown, red, blue, green and black Malaysia Shrimp Atyidae Shrimp The Malaya Shrimp is not surprisingly from the Southeast Asian country of Malaysia, where it is found inhabiting tropical streams, lakes and ponds. While it's introduction to the aquarium trade was only recently (late 2000's), the Malaya Shrimp has been spreading quickly throughout the hobby as it is easy to care for and breed. The wide variety of colors and patterns has made the Malaya Shrimp an instant success within the aquarium hobby trade, and will most likely lead to some very interesting selectively bred variants given time. This wide range of coloration's including: clear, gold, brown, red, blue, green and black have led to many miss-identifications of the species. Malaya Shrimp are in general easy to keep when kept in aquariums with stable water conditions and warm tropical temperatures. They can peacefully co-exist with other dwarf shrimp species or with peaceful community fish. They should ideally be provided an aquarium environment that contains rocks, driftwood and/or plants to provide both a place for algae growth and shelter for the shrimp should they feel threatened. It is important to house them in an aquarium with a mature filtration system and high water quality, as they are accustomed to high quality water in their natural environment. This will also go a long way towards extending their relatively short lifespan of around 2 years. It is also important to not expose Malaya Shrimp or other invertebrate species to copper based medications as this can kill them. They should not be housed with aggressive fish species or with community species such as loaches and puffers as they eat small shrimps in the wild. Malaya Shrimp are not picky eaters, as they will readily accept a wide variety of meaty and vegetable based foods. Their diet should consist of a variety of vegetable and meaty foods including: algae, blanched vegetables (spinach, zucchini, etc.), algae wafers, fish food pellets/flake, shrimp pellets, blood worms, tubifex worms, etc. They should generally be fed once per day an amount of food that they will completely consume within a couple of hours. Being that they are scavengers, they are used to eating what they can find, thus it is alright to miss some feedings or to go a couple days without feeding if necessary. When kept with fish species, they will scavenge the aquarium bottom for leftover foods and decaying plant material if kept with live plants. The breeding cycle of the Malaya Shrimp is a bit different than most of the dwarf shrimp species, as they produce larvae instead of fully formed miniature shrimp. The larvae will develop into miniature shrimp over the course of a few days and will from there continue to develop as other dwarf shrimp offspring do. What is unique about the Malaya Shrimp is that generally shrimp species that produce larval offspring require brackish water to breed; however, the Malaya Shrimp will successfully breed and develop in freshwater. From this point on the baby shrimp will continue to develop into adult shrimp provided that they are kept in stable water conditions, have a steady food source and are not kept with predators that would eat them.
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Yellow Shrimp
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(Neocaridina heteropoda var. Yellow) Easy 2" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 65-85° F, dkh 3-15, pH 6.5-8.0 Yellow Selectively bred in Japan Shrimp Atyidae Shrimp The Yellow Shrimp has become a hobbyist favorite as it is one of the few freshwater invertebrates species to display a bright yellow coloration. Yellow Shrimp are a selectively bred variant of the wild Red Cherry Shrimp, that has been cultivated to bring out the yellow color morph. They have become so popular within the hobby that there production has become very widespread, with breeders all over the world now producing them in large numbers. Overall the Yellow Shrimp is an excellent aquarium species that brings vibrant color, is easy to keep and breed and is easily attainable within the aquarium hobby trade. Yellow Shrimp are a very hardy species that can easily thrive and breed within the aquarium environment when given stable water parameters and a steady food source. They should be kept with peaceful freshwater fish species in either a planted aquarium or a community aquarium with plenty of plants, rocks or driftwood to provide them with cover when threatened and a place to forage for algae. Like most freshwater invertebrate species, the Yellow Shrimp needs clean water with good filtration in order to thrive within an aquarium environment. It is also important to not expose this or other invertebrate species to copper based medications as this can kill them. Yellow Shrimp should not be housed with aggressive fish species or with community species such as Loaches and Puffers as they eat small shrimps in the wild. Yellow Shrimp feed primarily on freshwater algae, and are coveted for this as they make excellent tank cleaners. However, they will also consume detritus and uneaten foodstuffs that they come across in the aquarium substrate. If no algae is present within the aquarium, it is recommended to supplement their diet with algae tablets as algae makes up a very large portion of their diet in the wild and will help them maintain a healthy immune system. Yellow Shrimp will also readily consume sinking pellet foods intended for bottom feeding fish and invertebrates; as well as, cleaned and blanched (lightly boiled) vegetables. Yellow Shrimp are very prolific breeders that will readily breed within the home aquarium environment. At approximately 2 to 3 months of age, Yellow Shrimp will become sexually mature, and the females will begin to carry a clutch of yellowish eggs under their tail. If there are males present within the aquarium, the female will become impregnated and the clutch of eggs will hatch in about 1 month. The eggs will be carried by the female until they hatch into miniature replicas of their parents, as the Yellow Shrimp does not go through an intermediate plankton stage. At birth, the baby Yellow Shrimp are very small and are easily eaten by fish or sucked up into filters. Therefore, they should be provided their own breeding tank with a sponge covered filter intake and no fish present that could eat the young. The babies should be fed a diet consisting of algae, algae tablets, baby brine shrimp or crushed flake foods. It is important to maintain the water quality of the breeding tank to high levels and make sure that ammonia and nitrite levels remain very low.
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Snow Ball Shrimp
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(Neocaridina cf. zhangjiajiensis var. white) Easy 2" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 68-80° F, KH 3-10, pH 6.5-7.5 White, Transparent Selectively bred in Germany Shrimp Atyidae Shrimp The Snow Ball Shrimp is a pure white selectively bred species of the wild Neocaridina cf. zhangjiajiensis of Southeast Asia. Ulf Gottschalk of Germany was able over a period of years to selectively breed two very attractive variants of the Neocaridina cf. zhangjiajiensis, resulting in the blue ice colored Blue Pearl Shrimp and the pure white Snow Ball Shrimp. Thanks to the tedious breeding efforts of Ulf Gottschalk the hobbyist now has access to a brilliantly colored pure white shrimp species that stands out from other dwarf shrimps species via it's pure white coloration. Without a doubt, the Snow Ball Shrimp brings a unique appearance to the peaceful tropical community aquarium or shrimp nano aquarium that is truly special. Snow Ball Shrimp should be kept with peaceful freshwater fish species in either a planted aquarium or a community aquarium with plenty of plants, rocks or driftwood to provide them with cover when threatened and a place to forage for algae. Like most freshwater invertebrate species, the Snow Ball Shrimp needs clean water with stable water parameters and very good filtration in order to thrive within an aquarium environment. They do very well in community shrimp tanks or tropical community fish tanks with peaceful fish species. It is also important to not expose this or other invertebrate species to copper based medications as this can kill them. Snow Ball Shrimp should not be housed with aggressive fish species or with community species such as Loaches and Puffers as they eat small shrimps in the wild. Snow Ball Shrimp feed primarily on freshwater algae, and are coveted for this as they make excellent tank cleaners. However, they will also consume detritus and uneaten foodstuffs that they come across in the aquarium substrate. If no algae is present within the aquarium, it is recommended to supplement the Snow Ball Shrimps diet with algae tablets as algae makes up a very large portion of their diet in the wild and will help them maintain a healthy immune system. They can also be fed blanched vegetables, sinking pellets and other sinking commercial foods intended for bottom dwelling fish and invertebrates. Snow Ball Shrimp are one of the easier freshwater shrimp species to breed within the home aquarium environment. At approximately 2 to 3 months of age, Snow Ball Shrimp will become sexually mature, and the females will begin to carry a clutch of yellowish eggs under their tail. If there are males present within the aquarium, the female will become impregnated and the clutch of eggs will hatch in about 1 month. The eggs will be carried by the female until they hatch into miniature replicas of their parents, as the Snow Ball Shrimp does not go through an intermediate plankton stage. At birth, the baby Snow Ball Shrimp are very small and are easily eaten by fish or sucked up into filters. Therefore, they should be provided their own breeding tank with a sponge covered filter intake and no fish present that could eat the young. The babies should be fed a diet consisting of algae, algae tablets, baby brine shrimp or crushed flake foods. It is important to maintain the water quality of the breeding tank to high levels and make sure that ammonia and nitrite levels remain very low. It is important to note that as a selectively bred species, the Snow Ball Shrimp has been engineered to produce the its blue coloration. What this means is that when they breed, they will produce offspring with the same pure white coloration as this is what they have been designed to do. Crossing them with another species of Neocaridina will not result in an attractive color morph, but will instead create very unattractive offspring that essentially defeats the purpose of even keeping a selectively bred species.
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Blue Pearl Shrimp
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(Neocaridina cf. zhangjiajiensis var. blue) Easy 2" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 68-80° F, KH 3-10, pH 6.5-7.5 Blue, Transparent Selectively bred in Germany Shrimp Atyidae Shrimp The Blue Pearl Shrimp is a colorful selectively bred species of the wild Neocaridina cf. zhangjiajiensis of Southeast Asia. Ulf Gottschalk of Germany was able over a period of years to selectively breed two very attractive variants of the Neocaridina cf. zhangjiajiensis, resulting in the blue ice colored Blue Pearl Shrimp and the pure white Snow Ball Shrimp. Thanks to the tedious breeding efforts of Ulf Gottschalk the hobbyist now has access to a brilliantly colored light metallic blue shrimp species that stands out from other dwarf shrimps species including other darker blue species. Without a doubt, the Blue Pearl Shrimp brings a brilliant blue appearance to the peaceful tropical community aquarium or shrimp nano aquarium that is truly beautiful and unique. Blue Pearl Shrimp should be kept with peaceful freshwater fish species in either a planted aquarium or a community aquarium with plenty of plants, rocks or driftwood to provide them with cover when threatened and a place to forage for algae. Like most freshwater invertebrate species, the Blue Pearl Shrimp needs clean water with stable water parameters and very good filtration in order to thrive within an aquarium environment. They do very well in community shrimp tanks or tropical community fish tanks with peaceful fish species. It is also important to not expose this or other invertebrate species to copper based medications as this can kill them. Blue Pearl Shrimp should not be housed with aggressive fish species or with community species such as loaches and puffers as they eat small shrimps in the wild. Blue Pearl Shrimp feed primarily on freshwater algae, and are coveted for this as they make excellent tank cleaners. However, they will also consume detritus and uneaten foodstuffs that they come across in the aquarium substrate. If no algae is present within the aquarium, it is recommended to supplement the Blue Pearl Shrimps diet with algae tablets as algae makes up a very large portion of their diet in the wild and will help them maintain a healthy immune system. They can also be fed blanched vegetables, sinking pellets and other sinking commercial foods intended for bottom dwelling fish and invertebrates. Blue Pearl Shrimp are one of the easier freshwater shrimp species to breed within the home aquarium environment. At approximately 2 to 3 months of age, Blue Pearl Shrimp will become sexually mature, and the females will begin to carry a clutch of yellowish eggs under their tail. If there are males present within the aquarium, the female will become impregnated and the clutch of eggs will hatch in about 1 month. The eggs will be carried by the female until they hatch into miniature replicas of their parents, as the Blue Pearl Shrimp does not go through an intermediate plankton stage. At birth, the baby Blue Pearl Shrimp are very small and are easily eaten by fish or sucked up into filters. Therefore, they should be provided their own breeding tank with a sponge covered filter intake and no fish present that could eat the young. The babies should be fed a diet consisting of algae, algae tablets, baby brine shrimp or crushed flake foods. It is important to maintain the water quality of the breeding tank to high levels and make sure that ammonia and nitrite levels remain very low. It is important to note that as a selectively bred species, the Blue Pearl Shrimp has been engineered to produce the its blue coloration. What this means is that when they breed, they will produce offspring with the same light blue coloration as this is what they have been designed to do. Crossing them with another species of Neocaridina will not result in an attractive color morph, but will instead create very non attractive offspring that essentially defeats the purpose of even keeping a selectively bred species.
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Black Tiger Shrimp
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(Caridina cf. cantonensis) Easy 2" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 68-78° F, KH 2-10, pH 6.0-7.3 Black Southeast Asia Shrimp Atyidae Shrimp Black Tiger Shrimp are a color variant of the Southeast Asian Tiger Shrimp, where they have been selectively bred over the years to accentuate the blue color morph found in some naturally occurring Tiger Shrimp. Black Tiger Shrimp are a tropical shrimp species found commonly within lakes and slow moving rivers and streams. They have become very popular within the aquarium hobby over the years due to their relative ease of care and beautiful coloration and behaviors. Black Tiger Shrimp can successfully be kept with other dwarf shrimp or in peaceful community aquariums that have a mature filtration system and stable water parameters. Black Tiger Shrimp are considered a very hardy species of tropical dwarf shrimp that can be at home in a dwarf shrimp species only aquarium or a peaceful community aquarium. They do best in aquariums that have a mature biological filtration system, stable water parameters and water that is slightly acidic. When kept in water that is alkaline, the Black Tiger Shrimp is more prone to have a shorter life span and is unlikely to breed. When kept within an aquarium with softer and slightly acidic water, the Black Tiger Shrimp has been known to be a prolific breeder with a lifespan of close to 2 years. They do best in aquariums with plants, rocks and driftwood on which they can graze for naturally growing algae and to seek shelter when they feel threatened. As with most all invertebrates, Black Tiger Shrimp are very sensitive to copper, thus copper based medicines should not be used in aquariums housing Black Tiger Shrimp. Black Tiger Shrimp spend much of their time in the wild grazing on algae and decaying vegetation that settles on the lake bottom. Their diet when housed in an aquarium environment should also contain a large amount of algae and vegetable matter in it with a smaller portion of their diet coming from meaty foods. If there isn't enough algae present within the aquarium to sustain the shrimp colony, they can be fed blanched vegetables, sinking algae wafers or pellets and other sinking commercial foods intended for bottom dwelling fish and invertebrates. The Black Tiger Shrimp is considered easy to breed as they do not have any special breeding requirements and have a long history of successful breeding within the aquarium environment. The main requirement to breed Black Tiger Shrimp is to provide them an aquarium with stable water parameters that are very close to the following: Ph 6 - 7.25, Temperature 68 - 75 and Hardness 2 - 10 dkh. Lastly, the breeding aquarium must have a least one male and one female and given the correct water parameters they should have no trouble breeding. Females can be differentiated from male Black Tiger Shrimps as they will have a longer and wider tail section and be slightly larger overall.
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Blue Tiger Shrimp
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(Caridina cf. cantonensis) Easy 2" 10 Peaceful Omnivore 68-78° F, KH 2-10, pH 6.0-7.3 Blue, White, Transparent Southeast Asia Shrimp Atyidae Shrimp Blue Tiger Shrimp are a color variant of the Southeast Asian Tiger Shrimp, where they have been selectively bred over the years to accentuate the blue color morph found in some naturally occurring Tiger Shrimp. Blue Tiger Shrimp are a tropical shrimp species found commonly within lakes and slow moving rivers and streams. They have become very popular within the aquarium hobby over the years due to their relative ease of care and beautiful coloration and behaviors. Blue Tiger Shrimp can successfully be kept with other dwarf shrimp or in peaceful community aquariums that have a mature filtration system and stable water parameters. Blue Tiger Shrimp are considered a very hardy species of tropical dwarf shrimp that can be at home in a dwarf shrimp species only aquarium or a peaceful community aquarium. They do best in aquariums that have a mature biological filtration system, stable water parameters and water that is slightly acidic. When kept in water that is alkaline, the Blue Tiger Shrimp is more prone to have a shorter life span and is unlikely to breed. When kept within an aquarium with softer and slightly acidic water, the Blue Tiger Shrimp has been known to be a prolific breeder with a lifespan of close to 2 years. They do best in aquariums with plants, rocks and driftwood on which they can graze for naturally growing algae and to seek shelter when they feel threatened. As with most all invertebrates, Blue Tiger Shrimp are very sensitive to copper, thus copper based medicines should not be used in aquariums housing Blue Tiger Shrimp. Blue Tiger Shrimp spend much of their time in the wild grazing on algae and decaying vegetation that settles on the lake bottom. Their diet when housed in an aquarium environment should also contain a large amount of algae and vegetable matter in it with a smaller portion of their diet coming from meaty foods. If there isn't enough algae present within the aquarium to sustain the shrimp colony, they can be fed blanched vegetables, sinking algae wafers or pellets and other sinking commercial foods intended for bottom dwelling fish and invertebrates. The Blue Tiger Shrimp is considered easy to breed as they do not have any special breeding requirements and have a long history of successful breeding within the aquarium environment. The main requirement to breed Blue Tiger Shrimp is to provide them an aquarium with stable water parameters that are very close to the following: Ph 6 - 7.25, Temperature 68 - 75 and Hardness 2 - 10 dkh. Lastly, the breeding aquarium must have a least one male and one female and given the correct water parameters they should have no trouble breeding. Females can be differentiated from male Blue Tiger Shrimps as they will have a longer and wider tail section and be slightly larger overall.