Ashley Gilbert

Lives in Canada
Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish
3 likes Anglefish
(Pterophyllum sp.) Easy Semi-aggressive 6" 30 gallons 75-82° F, KH 1-5, pH 5.8-7.0 Omnivore Captive bred Cichlidae Angelfish Community The Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) is the result of selective breeding that over the course of decades has produced the brilliantly colored and patterned specimens now found within the aquarium hobby. Todays Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish are the culmination of many years worth of selective line breeding, which has combined attributes of fish carrying the "Philippine blue pb gene" with multiple more established lines of Angelfish including: Zebra Angelfish, Platinum Angelfish, Albino Angelfish and many others. In addition to the traits common to a Marbled Angelfish, the Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish is selectively bred with Angelfish exhibiting the blue color gene in or to combine the both the blue coloration and the marbled pattern of a Marbled Angelfish. While generally available for sale within the aquarium hobby, the Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish is one of the more rare variants to find in the average local fish store. Thus, many hobbyists acquire Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish online from specialty retailers or from breeders at aquarium shows or conferences. Like all Angelfish, the Blue Platinum Marble prefers warm temperate waters similar to that of their native Amazon basin in South America, where they are found in calm waterways and flood plains. In nature, Angels are found living in areas with plenty of dense vegetation and tree roots, which they use for protection against larger fish species and as a place to hunt insect larvae and other foodstuffs. Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish will do well in aquariums that are at least 30 gallons or larger and have plenty of plants and/or driftwood. As a group freshwater Angelfish are territorial and will squabble with one another until a dominant male is established. They can be kept singularly, in mated pairs or in medium sized groups of 6 or more. When kept in groups they will need an aquarium considerably larger than a 30 gallon aquarium that would be appropriate for a single specimen or pair, smaller groups will do well in a 75 gallon and larger groups (more than 6) will need a 125 gallon or larger tank. Contrary to popular belief, long finned species like the Angelfish can be kept with barbs and other "fin nipping" species. The key here is that the fin nipping species be kept in proper sized groups, so that they nip at each other instead of nipping at the Angelfish or other species that are not equipped for this type of behavior. Angelfish in general require fairly constant water parameters and are less forgiving than many other freshwater community species towards fluctuations in pH or temperature. Like with most South American cichlid species, the Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish prefers soft, slightly acidic water with temperatures that stay between 79 and 83 degrees. However, the farm bred specimens that are generally sold in aquarium stores are more tolerant of a wider range of water parameters than their wild caught cousins. Angelfish are omnivores and should be fed a variety of foods including meaty and vegetable based foods. They have a particular love for blood worms, black worms, tubifex worms and similar food items, but will readily consume flake, pellet and frozen foods. They should be fed about twice per day the amount of food that they will consume within 5 minutes. When housed in aquariums with many faster swimming fish species, it may be necessary to increase feedings to 3 times per day to make sure that the Angel is properly fed. This is rarely an issue with adult angelfish as they will generally feed very aggressively and are rarely intimidated by other community fish species. Full grown Angelfish will prey on small fish species like small Neon Tetras, Mosquito Danios or pretty much any small species that will fit into their mouth. They generally wait until the aquarium lights are off for the night and hunt the small fish while they sleep, which makes them easy prey. Because they grow to be a fairly large fish, adult Blue Zebra Angels are capable of eating small fish up to 1 inch in length. Angelfish form monogamous pairs. They lay eggs on smooth vertical surfaces like a piece of wood, a flat leaf, smooth rocks, slate, or even the aquarium glass. Breeders often provide an artificial spawning site such as a piece of slate, a ceramic cone, or a vertical piece of plastic pipe in order to more easily facilitate removing the eggs from the breeding tank if needed. Howerver, as with most cichlids, Angelfish perform brood care where the parents will tend to the eggs, and when they hatch the parents will hang the fry on vertical surfaces until they become free-swimming. Sexing angelfish is difficult even for experienced angelfish breeders can usually discriminate male from female visually, it is not foolproof. Only during spawning will you be able to tell the male from the female because the female has a thick, blunt breeding tube, and the male has a thin, more pointed breeding tube. Breeding specialized variants like the Blue Platinum Marble Angelfish requires a deeper look into the genetics of fish breeding and is beyond the scope of this profile.
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Ashley Gilbert
Sara Bruce
Panda Cory Cat
2 likes Cory Cats
(Corydoras panda) Easy Peaceful 2" 30 gallons 72-79° F, KH 1-12, pH 5.8-7.8 Omnivore South America, Amazon River basin Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community The Panda Cory Cat received its common name from the combination of its off-white base coloration and contrasting black marks over its eyes and just before its tail-fin, thus giving an appearance similar to that of a Giant Panda. Their peaceful disposition, attractive coloration and active personality has made the Panda Cory a popular staple within the aquarium hobby. The beneficial nature of Cory Cats to consume leftover food items and decaying plant material from the aquarium substrate makes them practically a must have for planted and community fish aquariums. Cory Cats are a communal species who live in substantially sized groups of up to 30 individuals in the wild. Within the aquarium environment it is best to keep them in groups of at least 4 to 6 individuals. This can be a mix of different Corydoras species or all of a single species. While they can be kept as a single specimen or a pair, they tend to not do nearly as well as when kept in groups and will generally have a far shorter lifespan. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. The ideal aquarium environment for the Panda Cory Cat is one that closely resembles their native jungle stream habitat. Basically your typical Amazon biotope consisting of a soft sandy substrate, areas of dense vegetation, open swimming areas and submerged wood or root along with some portions of the tank having filtered lighting, would be ideal. To achieve this setup, hobbyists will want to use a substrate of river sand or a small sized smooth gravel, utilize plenty of driftwood or tree root along with some low light ground cover plants like Java Ferns, Anubias or taller plants with larger leaves like Sword plants, which will filter the bright aquarium lights and complete the look. While their native habitat would have dried leaves littering the substrate, which would provide cover, filter sunlight and stain the water with brown tannins. This habitat is difficult to keep within the aquarium as it requires the hobbyist to remove the decaying leaves every few weeks to prevent the water from being fouled. As unlike their native streams which have a constant flow of freshwater passing through constantly, the home aquarium is much more of a closed ecosystem, which is more susceptible to adverse changes in water quality and chemistry if decaying matter is present within the aquarium. Panda Cory Cat will also do well in standard planted aquariums and very peaceful community aquariums. Quality water conditions are essential with this species as they are sensitive to deteriorating water conditions and high nitrates. As with all Cory Cats, do not use under gravel filtration and ensure the substrate receives some water flow and no large decaying items. Cory Cats are easily affected by poor water conditions, as they live right on the substrate where there is often less water flow and more decaying material and fish waste. The Panda Cory Cat is a foraging omnivore whose diet should contain a mixture of plant material and meaty foods, which combined will provide all the necessary vitamins and minerals they need for a proper diet and strong immune system. They are very easy to feed as they will readily take to a wide variety of commercial fish foods, algae and decaying plant material. Some good food choices are freeze-dried bloodworms, black worms, sinking pellets, shrimp pellets, flake food, brine shrimp and frozen and live foods designed for freshwater tropical fish.
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Ashley Gilbert
Tiger Shovelnose Catfish
(Pseudoplatystoma fasciatum) Moderate Aggressive 40" 180 gallons 75-82° F, KH 6-20, pH 6.0-8.0 Omnivore South America Pimelodidae Large Catfish Large-Bottom-Dweller Tiger Shovelnose Catfish (Pseudoplatystoma fasciatum) or as they are often affectionately known as TSN's are found throughout the larger rivers and tributaries of South America. As adults they typically stay in the larger deeper rivers where they spend much of their time along the river bottom looking for meaty foods to consume. Their attractive appearance, large size and overall interesting personality have made the Tiger Shovelnose Catfish a very popular aquarium species with hobbyist who keep larger (monster) fish species. The Tiger Shovelnose Catfish is a large catfish species that can attain a length of over 3 feet within the aquarium environment, thus require a very large aquarium as an adult. They have a long and slender body with a beautiful silver coloration along with black stripes and spots covering the entirety of the body, which gives them a tiger-like appearance. Their mouth is adorned with very long whiskers in order to seek out prey in dark or dimly lit areas, along with a long, large, flat shaped mouth which they use to inhale unsuspecting prey. While the Tiger Shovelnose Catfish is readily available within the aquarium hobby, it is not suitable for the beginner or casual aquarium hobbyist. This species gets very large and aggressive and will require a very large aquarium as an adult in order to properly housed and cared for. Therefore, the Tiger Shovelnose is only recommended for intermediate to advanced aquarium hobbyists who have larger aquariums and powerful filtration systems rated to handle larger (monster) fish species like the Tiger Shovelnose. Along with a very large aquarium and solid filtration, the Tiger Shovelnose will appreciate plenty of water flow along with some driftwood or rock formations to provide it some cover within the aquarium. The aquarium should be tightly covered with a strong weighted top, as the Tiger Shovelnose is a powerful jumper that can easily escape from an uncovered or poorly covered aquarium. Lastly, the Tiger Shovelnose Catfish needs to be kept with other large aggressive fish species that are not small enough to fit in the mouth of the TSN and have a strong enough personality to not be bullied by an adult Tiger Shovelnose Catfish. Like most larger catfish species, the Tiger Shovelnose Catfish is an opportunistic feeder that will consume a wide variety of meaty items including both fish and invertebrates. In the wild the TSN is a nocturnal hunter that preys on a variety of native fish species found throughout South America, along with any crustacean that will fit in their mouths. In the aquarium environment the Tiger Shovelnose will readily accept a wide variety of foods including: worms, catfish pellets, pellet, frozen or freeze-dried meaty food preparations, fish that will fit in their mouths and a variety of shrimp, crab or other crustaceans found in fresh water aquariums. It is best to feed them a variety of meaty foods so that they receive a wide ranging diet which helps insure that they receive a range of nutrients to promote a healthy immune system. Hobbyists should feed them daily and adjust the amount of food and frequency of feedings based on the girth of the fish and the desired growth rate.
Longhorn Cowfish
2 likes Boxfish
(Lactoria cornuta) Expert Peaceful 20" 150 gallons 72-80° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025 Omnivore Indo-Pacific Ostraciidae Boxfish Reef Compatible Longhorn Cowfish are extremely popular with hobbyists and are most likely the first name that comes to mind when the species of Boxfish is mentioned. They are a hardy species that can be found grazing among the reefs and sand within less turbulent waters throughout the Indo-Pacific. They are generally peaceful and have an excellent defense against predation by having horns on their foreheads as well as their rear undersides as well as having the ability to secret a venomous ostracitoxin from their already poisonous skin when stressed (ostracitoxin can also be released upon death); care should be taken to keep Longhorn Cowfish comfortable and in a low stress environment as their ostracitoxin can kill other tank inhabitants. Longhorn Cowfish can be found through online vendors, but may sometimes be hard to find; special ordering may be necessary at local retailers. Although they may seem small at a local retailer, Longhorn Cowfish are often seen in the wild at sizes of 20", but generally only reach around 16" in an a home aquarium. They should be housed in nothing less than a 150 gallon system and be provided with plenty of live rock and live sand for shelter and grazing. They love to eat and due to this fact along with their large adult size, they can add a sizable biological load to their aquarium; strong, efficient biological and mechanical filtration is required along with a quality protein skimmer. In the wild they prefer calmer waters and should not be exposed to high, turbulent water movement (low to moderate is recommended). Although they can be reef compatible, a FOWLR system is ultimately recommended as they will not usually harm corals or anemones, but will gladly snack on live snails, tubeworms, small shrimp, and benthic invertebrates in addition to small fish. Longhorn Cowfish are generally peaceful and should be housed with peaceful tank mates that will not cause them stress; however, they can become aggressive with conspecific tank mates and multiple specimens would need a much larger aquarium with plenty of separate territory. Choose tank mates wisely and remember that Longhorn Cowfish have the ability to release ostracitoxin into the water column. Longhorn Cowfish are omnivorous and can be observed in the wild searching for benthic invertebrates in the sand, eat various marine algae, and snacking upon snails, tubeworms, and small fish. They are not picky eaters and in an aquarium environment they will readily accept a wide array of live, frozen, or freeze-dried, and vitamin enriched brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, bloodworms, ghost shrimp, krill, chopped clams, marine algae, mussels, silver sides, snails, and quality, Spirulina-based flake foods for carnivores, omnivores, and herbivores as well as other prepared foods. Longhorn Cowfish, like other boxfish, have teeth that are constantly growing and can be kept in check by the feeding of live snails and various live "feeder" shrimp. Feed 2-3 times a day.
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Ashley Gilbert
Russell's Lionfish
2 likes Lionfish
(Pterois lunulata) Easy Semi-Aggressive 12" 55 gallons 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Carnivore Asia, Africa Scropaenidae Lionfish Fish Only The Russell's Lionfish has quite a few common names including: the Red Volitans, Spotless Lionfish, Soldier Lionfish; Largetail or Military Turkeyfish; and Plaintail Firefish. It is recognizable by its tan with light brown coloration and vertical stripes. The spines on the dorsal, anal, and pectoral fins are fleshy, and not banded like those of other Lionfish. The Russell's Lionfish is one of the larger species, which commonly reaches around a foot in length. This species is also one of the more hardy species and relatively easy to keep in the home aquarium. The spines on the fins are poisonous, and if you are stung, the reaction will be similar to a bee sting only a little stronger, which will cause both pain and swelling. As with all Lionfish care should be exercised when working around them in the aquarium to avoid being stung. The body of the Russell's Lionfish is mostly tan and brown stripes, with some black and white detailing. The pectoral fins are elongated with dark brown markings starting at the body and fading as they progress towards the end of the fins. The rear and anal fins are clear with small dark brown dots and small white stripes. The Russell's Lionfish requires a 55 gallon or larger aquarium with large caves or crevices to provide hiding places. It is a very hardy fish and generally peaceful, except towards other Lionfish or smaller fish that can be swallowed; such as, ornamental shrimp and small fish. The Russell's Lionfish has a semi-aggressive temperament and can be kept with other large fish species ranging from groupers to tangs without problem. It is possible to keep this species in a reef aquarium; however, it will may eat many types of small crustaceans and shrimp. Russell's Lionfish are often shy feeders when first introduced to aquarium life until they become acclimated to the tank. Generally feeding live foods such as feeder shrimp or feeder fish will help stimulate the Russell's Lionfish to begin eating. Once acclimated, the Russell's Lionfish will readily eat meaty foods; such as, chucks of fish, mussels and crustaceans. The spines on the ends of the fins are poisonous and cause pain and swelling to humans if stung.
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Ashley Gilbert
True Percula Clownfish
2 likes Clownfish
(Amphiprion percula) Moderate Semi-aggressive 3" 30 gallons 74-82° F, dKH 8-12, sg 1.020-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4 Omnivore Indo-Pacific, Papua New Guinea, Singapore, Solomon Islands Pomacentridae Clownfish Reef Compatible The True Percula Clownfish (Amphiprion percula) is possibly the most recognized and popular marine fish species found within the aquarium hobby. Their bright coloration, ease of care and peaceful disposition have made them one of the most popular fish species within the marine aquarium hobby for decades. Their inclusion in movies, commercials and countless publications has made the True Percula Clownfish widely recognizable by both aquarium hobbyists and the general population as well. In addition to their attractive and recognizable color patter, True Percula Clownfish also have an interesting swimming style that is produced by rowing their pectoral fins instead of flapping them like most other fish species. Percula Clownfish are excellent additions for reef aquariums, peaceful community aquariums and larger nano reef aquariums. When describing True Percula Clownfish (Amphiprion percula) it is important to cover the distinction between this species and the similar False Percula (Amphiprion ocellaris). True Percula clownfish generally have 10 dorsal spines with three white bars, with the middle bar having a forward projecting shape. True Percula also have well defined black lines separating the orange and white areas of the fish, often the black areas can be quite thick. The False Percula will typically have 11 dorsal spines and a taller anterior dorsal fin with either no black areas between the orange and white or very thin black outlines separating the orange and white areas of the fish. Percula Clownfish are highly specialized reef fish, who will spend their entire life in a relatively small area on the reef provided that they have a host anemone and adequate food source. Their slow swimming style and ability to live happily in a relatively small space has always made Clownfish ideal for aquarium life. An ideal aquarium setup for Percula Clownfish would include an aquarium of 20 gallons or more, live rock, sand, moderate water flow, peaceful tank mates and a sea anemone host. At a minimum Percula Clownfish should be provided with quality water conditions and peaceful tank mates in order to do well. Percula Clownfish do well in pairs, in small groups of 4 to 6 individuals and singularly. When kept in small groups the two dominant specimens will form a male/female pair, while the rest of the group will stay much smaller in size and will remain asexual. If one of the dominant pair were to be removed or die, one of the asexual members of the group would change their sex to become the male of the mated pair. Clownfish are also commonly referred to as Anemonefish do to their ability and desire to live with a host anemone. Percula Clownfish have established a symbiotic relationship with sea anemones in order to provide them with shelter and protection from reef predators, while providing supplemental food sources for the anemone in the food that they will bring back to their host. Their preferred host anemones are those that are found in their natural reef habitats that range from the Indo-Pacific ocean to Australia in the south and southeast Asia in the north. Some of the best choices for compatible host anemones for Percula Clownfish include: Heteractis magnifica, Stygiomedusa gigantea and Stichodactyla mertensii. In the adsense of a suitable host anemone, some Percula Clownfish will host in some species of corals like Duncan Corals, Torch Corals, Mushroom Leather Corals and other similar species. Wild True Percula Clownfish feed mostly on zooplankton that are present in the currents above the reef and small crustaceans that are found living on the live rock and sand near the Clownfish's host anemone. Wild caught Percula Clownfish adapt quickly to commercial aquarium foods including flake, mini-pellet, frozen and freeze-dried preparations. Also many True Percula Clownfish available within the aquarium hobby trade are from breeders, thus have been fed commercial fish foods their entire lives. It is best to feed them multiple times per day and to vary their diet to include a variety of meaty foods and marine based plant and algae material.
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Ashley Gilbert
Golden Sailfin Molly
3 likes Mollies
(Poecilia latipinna) Moderate Peaceful 4" 20 gallons 70-82° F, KH 10-25, pH 7.5-8.5 Omnivore North America Poeciliidae Mollies Community The Golden Sailfin Molly is a peaceful and flexible fish species that originates from coastal areas of North America. They are generally found in brackish environments including coastal marshes, streams, swamps and ponds. Golden Sailfin Mollies are somewhat unique in their ability to live in both freshwater and saltwater if acclimated slowly over time. Their coastal brackish home waters have very hard water, so they should be provided with a teaspoon of salt per gallon added to their freshwater environment to provide them optimal conditions. Golden Sailfin Mollies are known for both their brilliant orange coloration and their prolific breeding habits that have mated pairs spawning roughly every 45 to 60 days. Overall a great fish for beginning hobbyists and more advanced hobbyists who are looking for an active swimming fish with a striking orange coloration. Golden Sailfin Mollies should be kept in a tropical community aquarium setup with warm water temperatures (78 to 82) and plenty of live plants. While they are a very hardy species that can adapt to a range of environments, Golden Sailfin Mollies prefer hard water with lots of vegetation. A teaspoon of salt per gallon is recommended for community aquariums housing Mollies and is beneficial to other community species as it helps to prevent ich and some other common diseases. Overall Golden Sailfin Mollyies are very peaceful and can easily coexist with just about any freshwater community species. To prevent unwanted babies many aquarists keep either males or females in their aquarium. Male Mollies can be distinguished by their larger top fins and more narrow elongated anal fins, while the females have finnage which is more rounded and blunt. However, if a mix of females and males are kept together in a community aquarium environment most of the babies will be eaten by the Molly parents and other tankmates which will keep their numbers in check. The Golden Sailfin Molly is very easy to feed, as it will readily accept a wide variety of meaty and plant based foods. It is best to provide them with both vegetable matter, algae and meaty items. Despite being an omnivore, the Mollies diet should consist of more plant material than meaty foods. This will more closely replicate their natural diet and allow for a longer lifespan. A varied diet will help maintain both the immune system and the overall health of the fish. Golden Sailfin Mollies will accept flake, freeze dried and frozen foods along with live foods and small pellets and wafers. In the case of the Golden Sailfin Molly, it is not about what conditions are needed for breeding or how to get them to breed as it how to get them to stop. Mollies in general (with the Golden Sailfin Molly being no exception) are very prolific breeders that if a male and female are present will breed in time. Distinguishing between male and female specimens is straight forward and can be done by sight. The males have genitalia in front of their anal fin and have a distinctly larger dorsal fin. Once breeding, a male/female pair of Golden Sailfin Mollies will birth young every 2 months or so. The babies should be promptly removed from the aquarium or provided a baby trap, as the parents will eat the young if they are left unprotected. Should the hobbyist aspire to breeding Mollies, and ideal breeding conditions for Mollies include a 30 gallon or larger aquarium, live plants including floating plants and an established algae growth.
Platinum Angelfish
3 likes Anglefish
(Pterophyllum sp.) Easy Semi-aggressive 6" 30 gallons 75-82° F, KH 1-5, pH 5.8-7.0 Omnivore Amazon, South America Cichlidae Angelfish Community Platinum Angelfish (Pterophyllum sp.) were originally derived from wild Golden Angelfish both containing a particular recessive gene. Since the result of this was an extremely beautiful platinum Angelfish, breeders were quick to identify the suitable parent fish to begin to mass produce Platinum Angelfish for the aquarium trade. Platinum Angelfish exhibit a brilliant silver/white sheen with just the slightest hint of blue or green on their fins. Specimens available within the aquarium hobby trade will almost always be farm raised and selectively bred for the aquarium hobby. Wild Platinum Angelfish hail from the warm temperate waters of the Amazon basin in South America, where they are found in calm waterways and flood plains. Platinum Angels are found living in areas with losts of plants or tree roots, which they use for protection against larger fish species and as a place to hunt insect larvae and other foodstuffs. These days this species is more commonly tank bred in the United States and parts of Southern Asia, than collected from the wild. They have long been sought after in the aquarium hobby because of their brilliant coloration and long flowing fins. Their long fins mean that they should not be kept with fish species that will nip or tear their fins. In a small or medium sized aquarium the Platinum Angel is best kept in a mated pair, in larger aquariums they can be kept in groups of 6 or more individuals. Platinum Angelfish will do well in aquariums that are 30 gallons or larger and have plenty of plants and/or driftwood. As a group freshwater Angelfish are territorial and will squabble with one another until a dominant male is established. They can be kept singularly, in mated pairs or in medium sized groups of 6 or more. Contrary to popular belief, long finned species like the Platinum Angelfish can be kept with barbs and other "fin nipping" species. The key here is that the fin nipping species be kept in proper sized groups, so that they nip at each other instead of nipping at the Angelfish or other species that are not equipped for this type of behavior. Barbs and other fin nippers prefer to be kept in groups and their nipping at each other is normal behavior that will not hurt them at all; however, this behavior is too boisterous for many other fish species and damaging to long finned fish species. Angelfish in general require fairly constant water parameters and are less forgiving than many other freshwater community species towards fluctuations in pH or temperature. Like with most South American cichlid species, the Platinum Angelfish prefers soft, slightly acidic water with temperatures that stay between 79 and 83 degrees. Platinum Angelfish are omnivores and should be fed a variety of foods including meaty and vegetable based foods. They have a particular love for blood worms, tubifex worms and similar food items, but will readily consume flake, pellet and frozen foods. They should be fed about twice per day the amount of food that they will consume within 5 minutes. When housed in aquariums with many faster swimming fish species, it may be necessary to increase feedings to 3 times per day to make sure that the Angel is properly fed. Full grown Platinum Angels will prey on small fish species like small Neon Tetras, Mosquito Danios or pretty much any small species that will fit into their mouth. They generally wait until the aquarium lights are off for the night and hunt the small fish while they sleep, which makes them easy prey. Because they grow to be a fairly large fish, adult Platinum Angels are capable of eating small fish up to 1 inch in length.
Zebra Danio
(Danio rerio) Easy Peaceful 3" 10 gallons 64-78° F, KH 8-12, pH 6.0-7.8 Omnivore Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh Cyprinidae Danios Community Zebra Danio (Danio rerio) have been a popular mainstay within the aquarium hobby for decades due to a combination of their attractive striped pattern, ease of care, active swimming style and widespread availability. They originate from the streams and tributaries of the mountains of Pakistan, India, Nepal and Bangladesh. However, they are now primarily raised on commercial fish farms in order to supply the demand from the aquarium hobby. Zebra Danio are excellent for beginning hobbyists due to their hardy nature, ability to tolerate a wide range of water parameters and overall ease of care and feeding. They are also popular because of their active swimming style and attractive striping. A group or small school of Zebra Danio swimming in and out of the plants or other aquarium decor is a very attractive sight to behold. Their small size and peaceful demeanor makes the Zebra Danio ideal for peaceful community aquariums, planted aquariums and nano or pico table top aquariums. The natural habitat of the Zebra Danio varies depending on seasonal rains as they spend the dry season in larger streams and tributaries, while venturing out into floodplains and smaller water ways during the wet season. They do not have specific aquarium decor requirements, but will appreciate the presence of plants, driftwood, rocks and other similar decor in order to give them someplace to retreat when threatened. Zebra Danio have only basic needs when it comes to filtration and water movement, with any aquarium designed to house tropical community fish being suitable. Tank mates should include other peaceful to semi-aggressive fish species that are not large enough to consider the Zebra Danio as food. Zebra Danio school in nature, thus they prefer to be kept in groups of 8 or more individuals. They will typically live longer if kept in groups or small schools and are generally considered more interesting to watch while swimming in tight groups. Being a omnivorous species the Zebra Danio needs a varied diet containing both meaty and vegetable matter. In the wild they are considered a micro predator since they prey on small insect larvae, crustaceans and other small invertebrates. They also consume algae and plant matter by picking at vegetation and decaying material on the substrate. Zebra Danio are very easy to feed in the aquarium environment and will readily consume a very wide variety of commercial foods. Their staple diet should consist of quality flake foods, freeze-dried foods, blood worms, tubifex worms, brine shrimp along with some frozen foods designed for tropical omnivores. They should be fed a couple of times per day an amount of food that they will consume within a couple of minutes.
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Ashley Gilbert
Peppered Cory Cat
3 likes Cory Cats
(Corydoras paleatus) Easy Peaceful 3" 20 gallons 72-80° F, KH 2-12, pH 6.0-7.0 Omnivore South America, Amazon Callichthyidae Cory Cats Community Peppered Cory Cat's are native to the streams and tributaries of South America, where they can be found living along river banks and river beds. They spend the vast majority of their time dwelling about the river bottom looking for both meaty of plant foods that have made their way to the river bottom. The Peppered Cory Cat's coloration and pattern help it blend into the substrate, which helps the cory cat avoid larger predators. Peppered Cory Cat live in large social groups in the wild and prefer to live in groups within the aquarium environment as well. It is recommended to keep at least a small group of 4 or more cory cats in the aquarium to satisfy their social requirements. As is the case with all species in the genus, Cory Cats will regularly swim quickly to the surface for a gulp of air. The fish swallows the air, which blood vessels in the hind gut extract oxygen from; it is then expelled through the vent the next time the fish breaks the surface for another gulp of air. This adaptation is believed to have evolved so that the fish can survive in poorly-oxygenated water such as stagnant pools during the dry season. It is however essential to the fish's well-being that it regularly swallows air. Aquariums housing Peppered Cory Cat's should contain plenty of vegetation, areas of diffused lighting and a sandy or smooth gravel substrate. It is important to provide plenty areas within the aquarium that are shaded from the bright aquarium lights. They will absolutely appreciate the presence of lush vegetation, driftwood and rocky caves in order to provide them a tank that resembles their native habitat. Like all cory cat species, the Peppered Cory Cat will do much better when kept in social groups of at least 4 individuals of their own species or mixed with other cory cat species. While the Peppered Cory Cat will gladly scavenge the aquarium substrate for leftover foodstuffs and decaying plant material, they should also be provided sinking foods designed for bottom dwelling fish species. Peppered Cory Cat's are scavengers that need to eat a wide variety of foods that include both plant and meaty foods. In the aquarium environment the Peppered Cory Cat will readily accept a variety of meaty and vegetable matter foodstuffs including: flake, freeze-dried, frozen, live foods and pellets. This species is an excellent scavenger that will work to keep the aquarium substrate clean of excess foodstuffs and some decaying plant matter. While this species is an excellent scavenger, supplemental foods such as bloodworms, tubifex, flake food, or sinking carnivore pellets should be offered to ensure proper nutrition.